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Where's the beef?

Is there fraud waste and abuse happening in Grant County?

Option 1: In-house web development and maintenance...COST: estimated $250

Option 2: Outsourced web development and maintenance.... COST: estimated few thousand dollars

Being soul mates with a County Commissioner...COST: Priceless!

After the decision was made concerning the Grant County Website, it was shown to me that the Commissioner making the major push to hire Option #2 had only a few months ago referred to the person as her "soulmate".

Was this job a real need for the county or was it a way to pad pockets of a friend? You decide for yourself.

We will be posting all evidence concerning this issue and anything else that might be deemed unusual.

HEY Grant County residents; a new website has just been published specifically for YOU!

What is the NEW website URL? http://www.grantcountyoklahoma.com

Here is a quote from the website Mandy Smith published: This website was created as a way for our citizens that live in the county or have lived in our county at one point to be able to keep up with what is happening in their hometowns. Whether it is on the level of local government or local community we are making sure that we get all the information to you. We will be offering all sorts of fun information from weekly recipes to the decisions being made by our local government and everything in-between. We would love to hear any input, suggestions, and creative ideas that you might have.

So, get involved, go see the site, sign up and participate in the FUN!

FYI: Grantcountyoklahoma.com is NOT the official Grant County website. The official website is still under construction and has NOT been published yet.

Last week two different trailers in Grant County District 3 had their axles crack in half. One while he was driving his tires narrowly missing two other vehicles. A very scary incident luckily no one was injured.

While we understand accidents happen, two of the same type happening so close together? Is this coincidence or gross negligence of vehicles hauling hundreds pounds of shale every week.

Hopefully we will have more information on this issue soon.

It has been some time now. However, I often think about Meredith Truhlar. She was very special to me. She helped me start this online magazine. Her desire to publish the news went beyond measure, and I miss her dearly.

It was nearly a year, and I could not bring myself to remove the last two articles she wrote until recently. It was a very hard decision. However, her news will live on through our archives, and you can read them anytime you desire.

I would like to thank Meredith by providing her a page in her memory. If any resident of Medford or Grant County should have a picture or a story to share about Meredith Truhlar, please send it my way.

Thank you,

Mardy Bliss

It has been some time now. However, I often think about Meredith Truhlar. She was very special to me. She helped me start this online magazine. Her desire to publish the news went beyond measure, and I miss her dearly.

It was nearly a year, and I could not bring myself to remove the last two articles she wrote until recently. It was a very hard decision. However, her news will live on through our archives, and you can read them anytime you desire.

I would like to thank Meredith by providing her a page in her memory. If any resident of Medford or Grant County should have a picture or a story to share about Meredith Truhlar, please send it my way.

Thank you,

Mardy Bliss

Medford Alumni get together All Medford graduates (and their familes) are invited to a get together this Saturday, July 18, at 7:00pm at Smrcka's Dairy Snack. Several Medford Grads are working to get this group together, and they will generally try to meet the Third weekend of the month. (The locations may vary.) It has been reported that the get together is only for certain classes that graduated in the 60s, but that is an error. The organizers of the group want everyone to know that everyone is welcome. For more information contact Tomi Jill Rogers at: tomijillrogers@yahoo.com
Come out and enjoy the July 2 Independence Day Celebration at the Medford Airport. Enjoy food, fun, games, turtle races, local entertainment, and at the end of the evening: Fireworks! Turtle races start at 6:30. Entertainment takes the stage at 7.
The community wide garage sale will be held Saturday, June 6, 2009. 25 or 30 participants have signed up, so it'll be a great day to go garage-saling.
Check out the new webpage for the Medford Chamber of Commerce. Register for a chance to win $25 in Chamber bucks. The Medford Chamber of Commerce has a new webpage: www.medfordokchamber.com The members of the Chamber want to utilize the new Chamber webpage to provide information about Medford to the world wide web. We look at this as a way to promote Medford, maintain our community, and help the many businesses and individuals who volunteer to make the Chamber a success. To celebrate the new Chamber webpage, we are having a drawing to be held at the July 2 Fireworks celebration at the Medford Airport. To enter for a chance to win $25 in chamber bucks, send an email to possum@wiredok.com. On the subject line write: Chamber Drawing . In the body of the email, write your name and phone number. Or, if you wish, drop a postcard, with your name and phone number, to Chamber Drawing, PO Box 123, Medford, OK 73759. You don't have to be present to win. As a service to the community, the Chamber webpage has added a "library corner" as well as the records for Rosemond Cemetery. If any other Grant county cemetery records are available, and if you would like to let us host them on the webpage, please let us know. In the meantime, spread the word about the chamber webpage to your friends, relatives and former residents of Medford. We'd like to reach as many people as we can.
Medford Summer Reading Programs This year’s Medford public library’s summer reading programs will be held on each Wednesday morning in June at 10:30 a.m. in the civic Center. These programs are open to all children in Grant County and are free of charge! The theme for this year is “Be Creative at your Library. Come join the fun and register anytime for our programs in June or you can also register at any of the programs. Medford Summer School students will register through their teachers so if you’re going to summer school here in Medford, you don’t need to stop by the Library to register. We will also have a big dragon hanging in the Library this year. If you read at least one book each week you will be able to put a “scale” on the dragon! We would also like for you to stop by and check out some books or play on the train set! For those of you who haven’t been in lately, we have a large brand new rug in the children’s area with jungle animals on it!! If you have any questions about the programs please call Tomi at the Library at 395-2342 or toll free at 1 888 930-9914 if you live out of town (unless you are calling from a cell phone). We’ll look forward to seeing you! The following is a list of the programs: Wednesday June 3rd is a Magician/ventriloquist June 10th is a fun and informative red cross program June 17th is Professor B. Looney and his Balloon Animals June 24th is Children’s Artist Danny Gordon ** Also, the library is accepting donations for cookies, cans of Kool-aid, napkins and cups. Volunteers can drop off supplies at the library.
The building holding the former Bon Ton Cafe was demolished the first week of May 2009. The building had fallen into disrepair after standing empty for several years.
The Addison Group is looking for an experienced Administrative Assistant to work a contract to hire opportunity for a very established company in Medford, OK.

If you are interested or know someone who is, please send your resume to ksmith@addisonstaffing.com

"Call It What You Will" the second poetry collection by Medford High alum Sheldon S. Stout is now available at www.publishamerica.com. The book features 50 poems spanning Stout's 20 years of writing and cover art by Brande Morgan also a MHS alum. For more information you can contact Sheldon at sheldon_stout@yahoo.com.
casting for extras begins this weekend for a major motion picture starring Casey Affleck, Kate Hudson and Jessica Alba to be shot in Oklahoma City, Guthrie, Tulsa, Enid and Cordell, state officials and filmmakers announced Wednesday. Filming begins March 23 for "The Killer Inside Me,” a crime thriller based on a 1952 pulp novel by Oklahoma-born Jim Thompson. The film will be directed by Michael Winterbottom, an award-winning British filmmaker best known for helming "A Mighty Heart,” "24 Hour Party People” and "Jude.” Casting for extras will be from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday at Guthrie Junior High School, 700 E Oklahoma in Guthrie, and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday at Washita County Activity Center, 700 E Third Street in Cordell.
March 2, 2009, is the 4th Annual March Against Meth Day in Oklahoma. Students across the state of Oklahoma will be invited to participate in this special day. March Against Meth is a tribute in honor of Trooper Rocky Eales #632. Trooper Eales was killed in the line of duty on September 24, 1999 while trying to serve a search warrant at a residence in rural Sequoyah County. Trooper Eales was involved in drug interdiction with the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs during his career. This day has been chosen to raise awareness about the dangers of Methamphetamine use. Law Enforcement Officers throughout the state will distribute 67,000 special wrist bands along with a D.A.R.E. Parent Alert Letter regarding Methamphetamine. This is a commemorative and educational effort to raise awareness. March Against Meth is partnering with Crystal Darkness Phase II Meth Education. Oklahoma is continuing the fight in the war on drugs by leading the nation in a day of honor and awareness. Governor Brad Henry has proclaimed March 2, 2009 “March Against Meth Day” in Oklahoma. Oklahoma was the first state to pass a tough, ground-breaking Meth law that started a ripple effect throughout the nation. Here’s an opportunity to honor those who laid down their lives in the war on drugs.
Winter makes a brief appearance in Grant county this weekend. Early morning temperatures ranged from the freezing mark in southeast Oklahoma to the upper teens along the Kansas border. Brisk north winds averaged 15 to 25 mph...and sometimes stronger...keeping wind chills in the single digits and teens this morning...and in the 20s and 30s this afternoon. The winds will decrease by evening...setting the stage for a clear and cold night. South winds return Sunday...signaling a warming trend that will push temperatures into the 70s and low 80s by the middle of next week.
The Medford fire department responded Thursday night to a fire three miles west and two miles north of Renfrow. “When the department arrived on the scene we found a tool trailer used for work on the new pipeline had already been destroyed by fire. No determination of the origin of the fire could be made“. stated Dennis Brittain Medford Fire Chief. The Grant county Sheriff’s department and the fire Marshal, was called in to investigate. According to law enforcement official Monday, no determination of the cause of the fire has been made, but it appears to be suspicious.
Grant and Alfalfa County fire departments responded Friday night around 9:30 p.m. to 4 miles west of HWY 132 and 11 and a ½ mile south into Alfalfa County. Where a grass fire erupted, consuming approximately 100 acres. No known cause of the fire was determined. Departments responding to the fire were Hawley, Nescatunga, Nash, Manchester, Wakita, Pond Creek, Amorita-Bryon, Jet , Medford. And 4 graders from Alfalfa County. There were no structures involved and the fire was out at approximately 1 a.m
Obama's Family Once Lived in PC A girl who started school in Ponca City in the 1940s grew up to earn a Ph.D. in anthropology, taught English in a U.S. Embassy school in Indonesia and started the microfinance program in Indonesia in the late 1980s, granting small loans to poor entrepreneurs. She also had a son who became president of the United States. Ponca City was home to President Barack Obama's mother and grandparents in the late 1940s and early 1950s, The Ponca City News confirmed Friday. Obama's mother, Stanley Ann Dunham, was born in 1942 in Kansas. Her parents, Stanley and Madelyn Dunham, lived in Ponca City from about 1948 to 1951. Records from the vault of the Ponca City Schools Administration offices show Stanley Ann attended first and second grade at Jefferson Elementary School, which once was located on Ponca Avenue between Elm Street and Osage Street. A portion of the school currently houses the Child Development Center. She first was admitted to Jefferson in September of 1948. While she was a student at Jefferson, the Dunham family lived in a duplex on West Central Avenue. In September 1950, the president's mother transferred to Roosevelt Elementary School, where she attended third grade. School records and other sources showed the family moved to an address on North Thirteenth Street. Stanley Dunham brought his family to Ponca City from Wichita when he accepted a job as a salesman at the Jay Paris Furniture Store. Patricia Paris Moore, Jay Paris' daughter, said Friday she remembered Dunham as a joker when he worked in her father's store. Articles from 1949 in the archives of The Ponca City News named Dunham as a salesman at the furniture store in 1949. From Ponca City the Dunham family moved to Vernon, Texas, school records showed. The city's connection to the 44th president of the United States was noted in less than a sentence in a Washington Post article published August 22, 2008, less than three months before the presidential election. The article, which included considerable biographical information about Obama's mother, largely escaped notice until Ponca City resident and blogger Hugh Pickens read a post by 1988 Ponca City High School graduate Dale Smith about the article. Pickens has written about Obama's family on his blog, "Ponca City We Love You," at http://peacecorpsonline.typepad.com/poncacityweloveyou/. The Washington Post article, as well as a biography in Time Magazine in April 2008, indicate the family moved around the country, from Kansas to Ponca City, to Texas and California, ending up in Seattle when Stanley Ann was in high school. When she finished high school, the family moved again, to Honolulu, where she enrolled at the University of Hawaii. She met Barack Obama Sr. in a college Russian class, Time reported, and they married Feb. 2, 1961, when she was 18. The future president was born in August. The senior Obama returned to his home in Kenya and the couple divorced in Honolulu in January 1964, Time reported. He died in a car crash in Kenya in 1982. When young Obama was nearly 2, his mother, now using the name Ann, returned to college and earned her bachelor's degree. She met Lolo Soetoro, whom she married in 1967. He was the father of Obama's half sister, Maya Soetoro-Ng, who was born in 1970 in Indonesia. In 1971, she sent her son Obama back to live with his grandparents, the Dunhams, in Hawaii. A year later she and her daughter also returned to Hawaii, where she enrolled in a master's program at the University of Hawaii to study the anthropology of Indonesia, Time reported. She divorced her second husband in 1980. When Obama was 14, his mother decided to return to Indonesia to do fieldwork for her Ph.D. Obama stayed in Hawaii with his grandparents. She completed her 1,000-page dissertation in 1992, Time reported, the same year her father died. Just a few years later she was diagnosed with ovarian and uterine cancer and died at age 52 on Nov. 7, 1995, as Obama was starting his first campaign for the Illinois state senate. Madelyn Dunham, Obama's grandmother and last living parental figure, became ill in November, two weeks before election day. Obama left the campaign trail to fly to Honolulu to spend time with her. She died, with Obama's sister by her side, on Nov. 3, 2008, the day before Obama was elected president.
Northwest Canton: Lake level is 0.51 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair on the lake. Winter wheat plantings are in fair to poor condition due to lack of rain. Row crops in the area have been harvested and are in fair to good condition. Goose numbers are low to moderate. Hunting activity is low, with low success. The boat ramp west of the WMA headquarters is usable as are all boat ramps on the south side of the lake. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawdown is nearly complete. Ft. Supply: Lake level is 0.55 ft above normal. Habitat conditions are fair, with fair wheat conditions in the area. Goose numbers are low, with mostly Canada ’s. Hunting activity is low, with no reports of success. Bird movement in the area has been slow. Southwest Ft. Cobb : Lake level is normal. Habitat condition is fair. Winter wheat, corn and milo residue is in good condition. Goose numbers are good. Hunting activity in the area is slow, with good success. Birds are currently using fields on both sides of the lake 5 to 10 miles away. Hackberry: Refuge reservoir is approximately 5 foot below conservation pool. Habitat conditions are poor. Winter wheat in the area is in poor condition. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are good, with Canada ’s, white-front, and some light geese present. Due to lack of rainfall water is limited at Hackberry Flat WMA. Little River NWR: Food conditions in the area are good. Duck numbers: mallard 175; gadwall 100; wood duck 100; green-winged teal 4; merganser 10; wigeon 20. No geese observed in the area. Mountain Park: Lake level is 3.75 ft. below normal. Habitat condition is poor. Winter wheat is poor to fair. Goose numbers are fair. Hunting activity has been slow in the area, with no reports of success. Waurika: Lake level is 0.25 ft. below normal. Habitat condition is poor around the lake. Wheat condition in the area is fair, and wetland units are good to fair depending on the unit. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. No hunting activity observed in the area. Northeast Copan: Lake level is normal. Habitat condition is fair. Flooded native plants on wetland units are in fair condition, with corn fields and soybean fields harvested and in good condition. Plenty of flooded vegetation present to hold birds, when it thaws out. Duck numbers are high. Goose numbers are about 1,000 on the area. No hunting activity has been reported in the area. Eufaula: Lake level is 0.43 ft. below normal. Current habitat condition is poor, with very little farming in the area. Duck numbers are low. No geese observed. No significant bird movement was noticed in the area. Ft. Gibson: Lake level is 0.43 ft. above normal. Current habitat condition is good, with smartweed, barnyard grass, and some agricultural crops in the area. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low, with low success. Hulah: Lake level is 0.25 ft. above normal. Flooded native plants on wetland units are in fair condition. Wheat fields on the Wildlife Management Area are in good condition. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low, with low success. Most birds seen were on ponds and wetland units. Kaw: Lake level is 0.19 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is poor. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low, with low success. Bird movement has been minimal. Keystone: Lake level is 3.15 ft. below normal. Habitat conditions are poor, with no flooded vegetation due to summer and fall lake flooding. Both duck and goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low, with low success. All duck movement has been going out of the area. Hunters using the area this year should be prepared for very deep mud. Caution should be taken, especially if hunting alone. Oologah: Lake level is 0.36 ft. above normal. Current habitat conditions are poor, with no flooded millet. Ag fields around lake are in poor condition due to flood conditions this past summer. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are low, with mainly resident Canada ’s. No hunting activity observed in the area. Sooner: Lake level is 1.5 ft. below normal. Habitat conditions are poor. Winter wheat in the area is in poor condition. Duck numbers are good with mostly mallards. Goose numbers are good with mostly Canada ’s. Hunter activity is low, with poor success. Webbers Falls: Lake level is 2.75 ft. above normal. Current habitat condition is good, with smartweed, barnyard grass, bidens, cut soybeans, corn, milo and wheat in the area. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low, with low success. Southeast Grassy Slough: Large wetland unit is dry, with other units around 10% full. Habitat condition is poor. Duck numbers are low, with no geese observed in the area. No hunting activity observed in the area. Hugo: Lake level is normal. Habitat condition is poor, with native plants and a little wheat in the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low, with mainly residents. No hunting activity observed in the area. Bird movement in the area is slow. Due to lack of rainfall most WDU areas are several feet below normal, with most birds leaving these areas in the day to feed in farm ponds and creeks. Red Slough: A few units are mostly full, with other units very low. Habitat conditions are fair. Duck numbers are fair, with no geese observed in the area. No hunting activity observed in the area. Texoma: Lake level is 0.22 ft. above normal. No food sources flooded at current lake levels. All Japanese Millet plantings were lost to flooding in the summer. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low, with low success. With current food conditions hunting efforts should coincide with weather fronts. Wister: Lake level is 2 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is poor. Duck numbers are good. Goose numbers are low. No reports of hunting activity on the area.
The funeral for Dale L. Chain Jr., 56, of Hunter, will be 10:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 6, 2009, at Willow View United Methodist Church. Pastors Steve Littrell and Thomas Corrigan will officiate. Burial will be in White Cemetery, Hunter. Arrangements are by Henninger-Hinson Funeral Home. He was born Sept. 17, 1952, to Dale Sr. and Dortha Ball Chain and died Monday, Feb. 2, 2009, at Integris Bass Baptist Health Center. He was a 1970 graduate of Hunter High School and a lifelong farmer and rancher in the Hunter area. He joined the Army in 1970, serving six years, part of that time as a drill instructor. He married Sara Tarrant April 12, 1980, in Jet. He was a 23-year member of Hunter Volunteer Fire Department, serving as Fire Chief for the last three years. He also was a member of Grant County Sheriff Reserve Officers and worked part-time as a Pond Creek City Police Officer. He was a member of Hunter United Methodist Church. Surviving are his wife, Sarah of the home; four daughters, Amanda Payne of Enid, Diana Chain of Oklahoma City, and Rebecca and Trisha Chain, both of the home; his stepmother, Joan Chain of Oklahoma City; two sisters, Jacqueline Zachgo of Fairfax, Va., and Peggy Parrish of Hunter; and one granddaughter. He was preceded in death by both parents. Memorials may be made through the funeral home to the Dale Chain Children’s College Fund or Hunter Volunteer Fire Department. Condolences may be made online at www.enidwecare.com.
Very high wildfire potential is expected through Friday of this week. This has prompted Grant county Commissioners to issue a county Burn Ban resolution during their January 26 meeting. All outdoor burning is prohibited with the exception of out door grilling. Any person guilty of violating this county issued resolution shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be subject to a find up to $500, according to the resolution issued January 26th. Wind Gust was reaching 31 mph at 11 a.m. Sunday morning.
The Hawley fire department responded to one mile north of Sand Creek early Friday morning January 30th when a passerby noticed the old Fairview Christian Church building was on fire around 5 :20 a.m. The building and its contents were a complete loss. No cause of the fire has been determined. Although, a Fire Marshall was called in to assist in the investigation. “The fire does look suspicious, for one reason, there has not been any electricity connected to the building in about four years. The fire remains under investigation,” stated Grant County Sheriff, Roland Hula
CENTRAL Hefner: Elevation normal, water 40. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 15 ft. around the dam. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County . Thunderbird: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water clear. Crappie fair to good on small minnows and jigs at 8-10 ft. around structure. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County . NORTHEAST Birch: Elevation below normal, water 36 and clear. Crappie fair on black and chartreuse jigs at 25-30 ft. over brush. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden for Osage County . Ft. Gibson: Elevation normal and clear. Crappie are biting on chartreuse and black jigs at 15-25 ft. under the docks. Paddlefish are moving into the river. Catfish biting on fair in the main river channel in the lake on shad heads and live shad. White bass fair fished real slow with curl tail grubs and minnows in the deeper holes in the river. Report submitted by Rick Stafford with www.3riverguideservice.com Grand Lake: Upper end: Elevation slightly below normal, water 42. Largemouth bass good on black angel, Eakin’s or jewel jigs. White bass fair on white grubs and small spinnerbaits. Channel, blue and flathead catfish good on shad at 60-80 ft. Crappie good on silver minnows, rosy red minnows, grandpa’s jigs in chartreuse and pink and on Bobby Garland jigs in Vegas, gumdrop, salt and pepper and blue ice at 22 ft. around brush piles and docks and at 2-4 ft. at river feeders. Paddlefish are picking up. Report submitted by Grand Lake Sports Center . Kaw: Crappie good in upper end of lake around Washunga Bay and North of Kaw City in manmade brush piles on minnows fished at 18-26 ft. Striped bass hybrids fair below the dam during periods of water release on 1/4-5/8 ounce jigs with four sassy shad style bodies or bucktails white or pearl colored. Blue catfish fair around Washunga on juglines baited with fresh cut shad at 25-35 ft. Report submitted by Marshall Reigh, game warden stationed in Grant and Kay counties. Lower Illinois: January 26. Elevation normal, water 49 and clear. Trout excellent on rooster tails at 1-2 ft. at the dam and Watt’s and on power baits on bottom at river access and Gore Landing. Fly-fishing excellent. Report submitted by D. Tracy, Town of Gore . Oologah: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Water temp in upper 40's to lower 50's. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around brush piles at 15-18 ft. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County . Pawhuska Lake: Elevation 5 ft. below normal, water 35 and clear. Trout excellent on chartreuse jigs and power baits with 16 inch leaders at 5 ft. and fair on gold inline spinnerbaits. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden for Osage County . NORTHWEST Canton: Elevation normal. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs near brush along dam and Canadian River area. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County . SOUTHEAST Arbuckle: Elevation 4 1/2 ft. below normal, water 44 and stained to clear. Crappie fair at 35-65 ft on minnows and spoons. White bass on spoons on mid lake knolls. Bass fishing slow to fair using jerk baits and swim baits. Report submitted by Jack Melton Blue River: Elevation below normal, water 39 and clear. Trout fair on garlic scented powerbait, power worms, and meal worms. Trout good on black and red super dupers and in-line spinners. Trout good on red midges, San Juan worms, pheasant tails, and hares ears. Smallmouth, spotted, and largemouth bass fair on soft plastics and in-line spinners. Channel catfish fair on stinkbait and liver. Flathead catfish fair on sunfish. Report submitted by Matt Gamble, biologist at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area. Broken Bow: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on jig and pig black #11 around structure. Catfish good on juglines with cut baits. Look for walleye starting to run when water temperature reaches 45 degrees. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County . Eufaula: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water clear. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-20 ft. around brush piles under boat docks. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County . Lower Mountain Fork River: Fishing good. Small flies, properly presented and drifted are catching the bulk of the fish. A report from the Re-regulation dam area said that several large fish were either landed or broken off. No reports from Presbyterian falls area. In the Park, anglers are having success using very small flies, sometimes trailed behind an attractor fly. There are three methods of catching these trout; immitate a very small insect, immitate a minnow or crawfish or use an attractor pattern. The flies used to fish these methods have been; various midge patterns, Zebra midge, Wooly Bugger, Clouser Minnow, or egg patterns and San Juan worms. Report submitted by Beavers Bend Fly Shop. McGee Creek: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 49 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastic lures and jig and pigs fished slowly at 15-25 ft. over underwater structure. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County . Pine Creek: Elevation below normal and clear. Bass fair on shad colored deep running crankbaits off of rocky points. Crappie fair on blue jigs and spoons around timber. Catfish good on liver. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County . Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water 42 and murky. Crappie fair at 10 ft. using minnows fishing the edge of the old creek channels. Blue catfish good at 8-25 ft. using fresh cut shad fishing the old channels or the windy shorelines. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County . Sardis Lake: Bass good to fair on crankbaits around points and creek channels and around cover on spinnerbaits warmer afternoons best. Crappie good off of Jack Fork bridge with minnows and off of tower on live minnows, and on brush piles using pink grubs or green and black activity is better on sunny days. Flathead catfish slow on live bait on jugs or trotlines. Blue and channel catfish fair on jugs and trotlines on cut bait or shrimp. White bass good trolling around islands and on plugs. Walleye fair trolling around islands and around rip rap on deep diving plugs. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County. Texoma: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 48 and clear. Striped and white bass fair to good from Platter Flats south. Channel and blue catfish fair to good from Platter flats north. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County. Wister: Elevation normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair to slow on dark plastics baits at points and drop offs. Crappie fair to slow on small spinners and jigs around brush piles and fair to slow on minnows below dam area. Channel catfish fair to slow on cut shad and liver with jugs. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County. SOUTHWEST Altus-Lugert: Elevation 10 ft. below normal. Crappie fair. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park. Foss:. Elevation normal, water in the 30's and freezing around edges. Gates are closed. Striped bass hybrids and crappie good from fish house. A few walleye have been caught around fish house. Walleye fair. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House. Ft. Cobb: Elevation 1/3 ft. above normal. Crappie slow to fair on jigs around marina. Saugeye slow along east end of dam. Report submitted by James L. Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County. CENTRAL Hefner: Elevation normal, water 40. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 15 ft. around the dam. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County . Thunderbird: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water clear. Crappie fair to good on small minnows and jigs at 8-10 ft. around structure. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County . NORTHEAST Birch: Elevation below normal, water 36 and clear. Crappie fair on black and chartreuse jigs at 25-30 ft. over brush. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden for Osage County . Ft. Gibson: Elevation normal and clear. Crappie are biting on chartreuse and black jigs at 15-25 ft. under the docks. Paddlefish are moving into the river. Catfish biting on fair in the main river channel in the lake on shad heads and live shad. White bass fair fished real slow with curl tail grubs and minnows in the deeper holes in the river. Report submitted by Rick Stafford with www.3riverguideservice.com Grand Lake: Upper end: Elevation slightly below normal, water 42. Largemouth bass good on black angel, Eakin’s or jewel jigs. White bass fair on white grubs and small spinnerbaits. Channel, blue and flathead catfish good on shad at 60-80 ft. Crappie good on silver minnows, rosy red minnows, grandpa’s jigs in chartreuse and pink and on Bobby Garland jigs in Vegas, gumdrop, salt and pepper and blue ice at 22 ft. around brush piles and docks and at 2-4 ft. at river feeders. Paddlefish are picking up. Report submitted by Grand Lake Sports Center . Kaw: Crappie good in upper end of lake around Washunga Bay and North of Kaw City in manmade brush piles on minnows fished at 18-26 ft. Striped bass hybrids fair below the dam during periods of water release on 1/4-5/8 ounce jigs with four sassy shad style bodies or bucktails white or pearl colored. Blue catfish fair around Washunga on juglines baited with fresh cut shad at 25-35 ft. Report submitted by Marshall Reigh, game warden stationed in Grant and Kay counties. Lower Illinois: January 26. Elevation normal, water 49 and clear. Trout excellent on rooster tails at 1-2 ft. at the dam and Watt’s and on power baits on bottom at river access and Gore Landing. Fly-fishing excellent. Report submitted by D. Tracy, Town of Gore . Oologah: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Water temp in upper 40's to lower 50's. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around brush piles at 15-18 ft. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County . Pawhuska Lake: Elevation 5 ft. below normal, water 35 and clear. Trout excellent on chartreuse jigs and power baits with 16 inch leaders at 5 ft. and fair on gold inline spinnerbaits. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden for Osage County . NORTHWEST Canton: Elevation normal. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs near brush along dam and Canadian River area. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County . SOUTHEAST Arbuckle: Elevation 4 1/2 ft. below normal, water 44 and stained to clear. Crappie fair at 35-65 ft on minnows and spoons. White bass on spoons on mid lake knolls. Bass fishing slow to fair using jerk baits and swim baits. Report submitted by Jack Melton Blue River: Elevation below normal, water 39 and clear. Trout fair on garlic scented powerbait, power worms, and meal worms. Trout good on black and red super dupers and in-line spinners. Trout good on red midges, San Juan worms, pheasant tails, and hares ears. Smallmouth, spotted, and largemouth bass fair on soft plastics and in-line spinners. Channel catfish fair on stinkbait and liver. Flathead catfish fair on sunfish. Report submitted by Matt Gamble, biologist at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area. Broken Bow: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on jig and pig black #11 around structure. Catfish good on juglines with cut baits. Look for walleye starting to run when water temperature reaches 45 degrees. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County . Eufaula: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water clear. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-20 ft. around brush piles under boat docks. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County . Lower Mountain Fork River: Fishing good. Small flies, properly presented and drifted are catching the bulk of the fish. A report from the Re-regulation dam area said that several large fish were either landed or broken off. No reports from Presbyterian falls area. In the Park, anglers are having success using very small flies, sometimes trailed behind an attractor fly. There are three methods of catching these trout; immitate a very small insect, immitate a minnow or crawfish or use an attractor pattern. The flies used to fish these methods have been; various midge patterns, Zebra midge, Wooly Bugger, Clouser Minnow, or egg patterns and San Juan worms. Report submitted by Beavers Bend Fly Shop. McGee Creek: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 49 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastic lures and jig and pigs fished slowly at 15-25 ft. over underwater structure. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County . Pine Creek: Elevation below normal and clear. Bass fair on shad colored deep running crankbaits off of rocky points. Crappie fair on blue jigs and spoons around timber. Catfish good on liver. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County . Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water 42 and murky. Crappie fair at 10 ft. using minnows fishing the edge of the old creek channels. Blue catfish good at 8-25 ft. using fresh cut shad fishing the old channels or the windy shorelines. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County . Sardis Lake: Bass good to fair on crankbaits around points and creek channels and around cover on spinnerbaits warmer afternoons best. Crappie good off of Jack Fork bridge with minnows and off of tower on live minnows, and on brush piles using pink grubs or green and black activity is better on sunny days. Flathead catfish slow on live bait on jugs or trotlines. Blue and channel catfish fair on jugs and trotlines on cut bait or shrimp. White bass good trolling around islands and on plugs. Walleye fair trolling around islands and around rip rap on deep diving plugs. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County. Texoma: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 48 and clear. Striped and white bass fair to good from Platter Flats south. Channel and blue catfish fair to good from Platter flats north. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County. Wister: Elevation normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair to slow on dark plastics baits at points and drop offs. Crappie fair to slow on small spinners and jigs around brush piles and fair to slow on minnows below dam area. Channel catfish fair to slow on cut shad and liver with jugs. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County. SOUTHWEST Altus-Lugert: Elevation 10 ft. below normal. Crappie fair. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park. Foss:. Elevation normal, water in the 30's and freezing around edges. Gates are closed. Striped bass hybrids and crappie good from fish house. A few walleye have been caught around fish house. Walleye fair. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House. Ft. Cobb: Elevation 1/3 ft. above normal. Crappie slow to fair on jigs around marina. Saugeye slow along east end of dam. Report submitted by James L. Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County.
A light wintry mix that fell Monday and Tuesday Jan 26 and 27th caused Medford school to be closed for classes Tuesday with more snow showers in the forecast for the rest of the day. Roads were very icy and very slick. ODOT sand trucks were out sanding highways 81 and 11.

The sub-freezing temperatures’ brought with it broken city water lines Medford water department is pictured Tuesday morning Jan 27 on South 4th Street repairing a line in the parking of the Putt-Putt golf course, that connects to the Lion’s Park.

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A strong gust of wind Friday afternoon turned the awning at the old Jack's General Store upside down. Yellow tape was placed around the area and Monday morning a small lift was moved on the property for the awning remover.

An accident Monday morning sent Pond Creek fire/EMS personnel to a one-car accident west on the Jefferson blacktop.

The driver, John Cole, Pond Creek, told officers he fell a sleep when he missed the curve and hit the cement banister. Cole complained of head and neck pain according to trooper 406 but refused treatment.

Cole was driving a 1994 Pontiac and received a citation by the trooper for "Inattention" to his driving.

Medford High Alum Sheldon S. Stout is preparing the follow up to his 2008 book "Pop, Punk or Pulp Poetry?" The collection titled "Tales from the Lost & Found" (working title) will be available in March or April and much like his first book is a random sampler of both old and new poetry and prose. Sheldon writes on many subjects in many styles and boasts "a little something for everyone" in his books. Sheldon's poetry can be found on both Myspace and Facebook. "Pop, Punk or Pulp Poetry?" is currently available at most online bookstores including Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Tower and Target as well as The NWOSU Bookstore in Alva and Hasting's in Enid. "Tales from the Lost & Found" coming soon.
The city of Medford has finally received the approval from the State on the sidewalk specs and advertising for bids will begin next month. Stated Dea Kretchmar today.
The Nash Volunteer Firefighter's Association will hold its annual Ground Hog Supper on Saturday, February 7, 2009, from 5 PM until 7 PM at the fire station in Nash. The annual fund raising supper is held each year to help the fire department raise money to purchase equipment and to help with operating expenses. Area residents, as well as visitors from surrounding communities, are treated to generous portions of scrambled eggs, whole hog sausage, biscuits, and gravy. The annual fund raising supper plays a major role in helping the Nash Fire Department provide quality fire protection and rescue service. Proceeds from the fund raiser are used to help purchase and maintain equipment. The department currently has two pumper trucks, three brush trucks, a tanker, and a heavy rescue vehicle that is equipped with a full compliment of rescue equipment. All of the fire department’s vehicles and equipment will be on display the night of the supper. Members of the department are quick to point out that the quality of their department is due largely to the financial and moral support they receive from the community. There are currently 21 members on the Nash Fire Department. Included in this number are those who are Firefighter I & II certified, First Responders, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT), Hazmat Techs, Critical Incident Stress Management Team members and certified Fire Service Instructors. The Nash Fire Department responds to calls throughout Grant, Alfalfa and Garfield Counties and has sent teams to major disasters throughout the state. Due to the Salt Fork River Bridge construction on St. Hwy. 132 north of Nash, those traveling from the north will need to take an alternate route. If you need more information, please call Gary Lillie 580-839-2480
Fire departments from Hawley, Nash, Newscatunga and Manchester responded to the Jonathan Bergman resident located northwest of Hwy 11 & 132 when a 60 by 12 mobile home and all contents were destroyed. According to Gary Lilly, spokesperson for the Hawley FD. According to Lilly there were no injuries and both Bergman and his mother Darlene were at home at the time of the fire. The Oklahoma Fire Marshal Sam Schaffnit ruled the cause of the fire as accidental calling it a electrical short. A fund has been established through the Bethel Hawley Baptist Church to assist them. Donations may be sent to: Bergman Fire Fund Bethel Hawley Baptist Church Rt. 1 box 58 Nash, OK. 73761
Medford Golf Course was vandalized when donuts were cut in the green on hole number 7 and lights at the airport were hit after a driver decided to have a little excitement in his life. When the Medford police department was contacted and asked if they were aware of the incident, they said they were and the matter was being handle, and this was the only comment that is being issued. The city has been contacted for damage estimates. I am waiting their reply.

What appeared to be vandalism with black spray paint sprayed on some of the downtown planters. In addition, the need to remove the planters for the new sidewalk project, has prompted the city to haul them off.

“The sidewalk plans are in the final review with the Oklahoma Department of Transportation. Hopefully, the engineer has made all the changes to satisfy them and we will be able to bid the project in the spring.” stated Dea Kretchmar, Medford city manager.

Disturbed by a startling number of suspected domestic violence homicides in the first two weeks of 2009, Attorney General Drew Edmondson is reminding Oklahomans that help is available to those in need. “Fifteen days into the new year and already nine people are dead from alleged incidents of domestic violence,” Edmondson said. “This is shocking and unacceptable.” The attorney general is asking victims of domestic abuse to contact his office’s Safeline to seek help. A 24-hour hotline, the Oklahoma Safeline serves as a statewide referral source for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. Calls to 1-800-522-SAFE are answered by a crisis intervention services specialist who can provide information about law enforcement and safety options and refer the caller to local resources for help. According to the Oklahoma Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Oklahoma’s first domestic violence homicide occurred in Sasakwa on the first day of the year. The coalition reports domestic homicide has claimed another life in Tulsa, two in Calera and a mother and four children in El Reno so far this year. “In two weeks, this state has averaged a domestic abuse-related death almost every 36 hours,” Edmondson said. “One person is dying every day and a half at the hands of a domestic partner.” According to the attorney general, there are shelters and programs all around the state to help those who suffer at the hands of an abuser. “It’s vitally important we get this information to our friends and neighbors who need to escape an abusive situation,” Edmondson said. “Nine lives have already been lost this year and many more likely hang in the balance. “Don’t become another statistic, a tragic story in the paper or on the evening news. Protect yourself and your children. Get help, get a plan and get out.”
1:00 P.M. *Karsten Meyer, PTA – Disciplinary hearing alleging falsification of records *Robert Joseph Owens, Orthotist – Disciplinary hearing alleging substance abuse and violation of Agreement *William Dale Wright, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging substance abuse *Mary Janice Young, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging substance abuse *Jonathan Ek, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging substance abuse, prescribing violations, fraud in applying for a medical license and physical conduct with a patient that is sexual in nature *Mark E. Rigney, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging substance abuse and violation of probation *Dhyia Brahim Al Qutshan, M.D. – Petition for Rehearing *Rex Stockard, Jr., M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging physical conduct with a patient that is sexual in nature ANNOUNCEMENTS OF HEARINGS CONTINUED David Paul Crass, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging prescribing violations Robert L. Kale, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging prescribing violations; sexual misconduct
The building that once housed the Bon Ton Café’ and strongly thought of the center hub of Medford where stories, jokes, and friendly arguments but most of all fellowship of Medford and area residents went for a good cup of coffee and excellent food. Was declared a public nuisance during the September 8th Council meeting by the city of Medford.

Since that time city manager, Dea Kretchmar has been working with Mr. Seaton on what needed to be done with the property. Mr. Seaton decided it would be in his best interest to deed the property over to the City, rather than make the necessary improvement to get it back into compliance with city code, stated Kretchmar.

“Several people have inquired about obtaining the property. The city council will probably seek proposals from interested parties and whoever has the best plans for the property will most likely end up with it. We are not sure yet if we will give/sell the property in its current state or demolish it and then sell it as a lot. It will depend on the proposals from those interested in doing something with the property. Cost and funding will determine how we proceed. If anyone has suggestion or ideas pertaining to how we should proceed, please let the city know.” stated Kretchmar.

CENTRAL Hefner: Elevation above normal, water 35 and murky. White bass good on two inch white grubs. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 16 ft. along dam shoreline and the east side of the lake. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County . Thunderbird: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water clear. Crappie fair to good on small minnows and jigs at 8-10 ft. around structure. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County . NORTHEAST Eucha: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 40 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around brush at 16-18 ft. Largemouth bass fair on deep running crankbaits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries . Ft. Gibson: Elevation 2 1/2 ft. above normal and falling, water clear. Stripers good below the dam on live bait and rattletraps during generation. Report submitted by Rick Stafford with 3riverguideservice.com Grand: Upper end: Elevation slightly below normal, water 43 and clear. Largemouth bass good on jigs and large minnows at 10-15 ft. White bass slow on small spinnerbaits and jig and spoons. Channel, blue and flathead catfish good on shad, shrimp and liver at 40-50 ft. Crappie good on minnows, shiners, rosy-reds, grandpa’s jigs in chartreuse and pink and Bobby Garland baits at 20-25 ft. Paddlefish slow in the channel and middle of the lake. Report submitted by Grand Lake Sport’s Center. Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits, spinnerbaits and bill baits in riprap and creek channels. Catfish fair on fresh cut baits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnow and jigs around fishing docks. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County . Kaw: Crappie fair on black and blue or black and chartreuse 1/16th ounce jigs on six pound test line at 18-24 ft. around man made brush piles in the Washunga Bay area. Striped bass hybrids and walleye fair on 1/8th and 3/16th ounce jigs tipped with a three inch white and red sassy shad fished very slow, below the dam. Report submitted by Marshall Reigh, game warden stationed in Grant and Kay Counties . Lower Illinois: Elevation normal, water 50 and clear. Trout excellent on rooster tails at 1-2 ft. at the dam and river access area and on power baits and salmon eggs on bottom at Watt’s. Report submitted by D. Tracy, Town of Gore . Oologah: Elevation near normal, water upper 40's to lower 50's and murky. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush piles 10-18 ft. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County . Skiatook: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water low 40’s and murky. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastics. Crappie fair on minnows at 5-10 ft. in creek channels. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County . Sooner: Catfish good on cut baits and live baits around points and channels. Fishing in the discharge is fair on topwater lures and sassy shad and good on ghost minnows. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County . Spavinaw: Elevation slightly above normal, water 40 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries . Webbers Falls: Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on jigs, worms and crankbaits in riprap and creek channels. Catfish fair on fresh cut baits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 16-22 ft. around bridges and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County . NORTHWEST Canton: Elevation normal. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near brush piles along dam and Canadian area. Channel catfish fair on shad in river channel. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County . SOUTHEAST Arbuckle: Elevation 4 ft. below normal, water 45 and stained from algae bloom. Crappie fair to good around brush piles. White bass fair on spoons around mid-lake ridges and humps. Bass fishing slow to fair on drop shot, jigs and jerk baits. Report submitted by Jack Melton. Blue River: Elevation below normal, water 41 and clear. Trout fair on power bait, salmon eggs, super dupers, and in-line spinnerbaits. Fly-fishing good on San Juan worms, olive wooly buggers, copper johns, zebra midges, and pheasant tails. Smallmouth and spotted bass fair on wooly buggers and soft plastic baits. Report submitted by Matt Gamble, biologist at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area. Broken Bow: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on jig and pig and black #11. Smallmouth bass fair on crawdad colored deep running crankbaits. Catfish good on juglines with cut shad. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around structure. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County . Eufaula: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water clear. Crappie fair at 14-16 ft. around boat docks with brush underneath. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County . Hugo: Elevation normal, water 55. Crappie fair on minnows around button brush. Blue catfish fair on cut bait. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties. Konawa: Elevation normal, water 47 and clear. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits at 5-10 ft. around points and road beds. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on minnows and jigs at 15 ft. in discharge canal. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County . McGee Creek: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water 50 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastic lures and jig and pigs fished slowly at 15-25 ft. over underwater structure. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County . Pine Creek: Elevation below normal, water clear. Bass fair on jig/pork frog combinations around rocky points as well as spoons in deeper water. Crappie good on spoons and fair on jigs in deeper channels. Catfish good on juglines baited with cut shad. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County . Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water murky. Crappie fair on minnows at 10 ft. around the edges and bends of the old creek channels in the Big Sans Bois, Sallisaw, and Dirty Creek areas. Blue catfish good on fresh cut bait at 8-20 ft. around windy points and shorelines around the lake. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County . Sardis Lake: Bass fair to good on crankbaits around points and creek channels and on spinnerbaits around cover, warmer afternoons best. Crappie good on minnows off of Jack Fork Bridge , on live minnows off of tower and on pink grubs or green and black around brush piles, activity is better on sunny days. Flathead catfish slow on juglines or trotlines with live bait. Blue and channel catfish fair on jugs and trotlines with cut bait or shrimp. White bass good trolling around islands and on plugs. Walleye fair trolling around islands and around riprap on deep diving plugs. Report submitted by Alan Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County . Texoma: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 51 and clear. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait in the south end of lake. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on live bait and cut shad from the Hwy 70 Bridge north. Crappie fair to good on small baits in Little Glass's and Widow Moore creeks. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County . Wister: Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth bass slow to fair on dark plastic baits around points and drop-offs. Crappie fair on small spinnerbaits and jigs around brush piles and on minnows below the dam area. Channel catfish slow to fair on juglines with cut shad and liver. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County . SOUTHWEST Altus-Lugert: Elevation 10 ft. below normal. Trout good on corn in the river. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park . Ft. Cobb: Elevation normal, gates closed, water 40's and clear. Striped bass hybrids slow on slabs in deep water. Walleye slow on live bait. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House. Tom Steed: Elevation 3 ft. below normal, water murky. Crappie slow on minnows at 20 ft. over brush piles. Report submitted by David Smith, game warden stationed in Kiowa County .
REGULAR MEETING AGENDA MEDFORD BOARD OF EDUCATION Monday, January 12, 2009 7:00 P.M Teachers Lounge 301 N. Main Medford, Oklahoma 73759 Posted this 9th day of January, 2009, at 1:35 p.m. at the main office entrance, cafeteria doors, and workroom in the Medford School Building and the school website. Posted by Gloria Gonzales. Deputy Clerk (NOTE): The Medford Board of Education may discus, vote to approve, vote to disapprove, vote to table or decide not to vote on any item on this agenda. 1. Call to order and recording of members present and absent to establish a quorum 2. Consent Agenda - (All of the following items, which concern reports and items of a routine nature normally approved at a board meeting, will be approved by one board vote, unless any board member desires to have a separate vote on any or all of these items. The consent agenda consists of the discussion, consideration, and approval of the following items): A. Approve with corrections minutes of December 8, 2008 regular meeting. B. Approval of monthly financial reports ending January 9, 2009. i. Treasurer’s cash balance report. ii. Encumbrance and warrant registers in the general, building, and bond funds. iii. School activity fund monthly summary. 3. Teacher’s report 4. Principal’s report 5. Superintendent’s report 6. Discussion, motion, and possible action to accept or reject the amended game officials salary schedule for 2008-09. 7. Discussion, motion, and possible action to declare old football jerseys as surplus. 8. Motion, consideration and vote to enter into Executive Session to conduct the annual evaluation of the Superintendent and discuss the Superintendent’s contract for the 2009-2010 school year. 25 O.S. §307 (B)(1) A. Vote to convene or not to convene into executive session. B. Vote to acknowledge the board has returned to open session. C. Reading of executive session minutes compliance statement. 9. Discussion, motion and possible action to vote to re-employ or find reasons that may exist to not employ Mickey Geurkink as Superintendent for the 2009-2010 school year. 10. New Business – Item(s) that could not have been foreseen or known about at the time agenda was posted. 11. Vote to adjourn
Proofreading is a dying art, would you say?) Man Kills Self Before Shooting Wife and Daughter This one caught in the SGV Tribune the other day and a call was made to the Editorial Room and asked who wrote this. It took two or three readings before the editor realized that what he was reading was impossible!!! They put in a correction the next day. I just couldn't help but send this along. Too funny. Something Went Wrong in Jet Crash, Expert Says No, really? Ya think? --------------------------------------------- Police Begin Campaign to Run Down Jaywalkers Now that's taking things a bit far! ----------------------------------------------------------- Panda Mating Fails; Veterinarian Takes Over What a guy! --------------------------------------------------------------- Miners Refuse to Work after Death 'good-for-nothing' lazy so-and-so's! ------------------------------------------------------ Juvenile Court to Try Shooting Defendant See if that works any better than a fair trial! ---------------------------------------------------------- War Dims Hope for Peace I can see where it might have that effect! ---------------------------------------------------------------- If Strike Isn't Settled Quickly, It May Last Awhile Ya think?! ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Cold Wave Linked to Temperatures Who would have thought! ---------------------------------------------------------------- Enfield ( London ) Couple Slain; Police Suspect Homicide They may be on to something! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Red Tape Holds Up New Bridges You mean there's something stronger than duct tape? Oklahoma's new construction program! ---------------------------------------------------------- Man Struck By Lightning: Faces Battery Charge He probably IS the battery charge! ---------------------------------------------- New Study of Obesity Looks for Larger Test Group Weren't they fat enough?! ----------------------------------------------- Astronaut Takes Blame for Gas in Spacecraft That's what he gets for eating those beans! ------------------------------------------------- Kids Make Nutritious Snacks Do they taste like chicken? ------------------------------------------------------------------- Local High School Dropouts Cut in Half Chainsaw Massacre all over again! *************************************************** Hospitals are Sued by 7 Foot Doctors Boy, are they tall! ******************************************* And the winner is.... Typhoon Rips Through Cemetery; Hundreds Dead Did I read that right? ***************************************************
The city of Medford has purchased two, 2005 Ford F150 pickups to be used by both water and maintenance departments.

“The pickups were purchased from a Texas leasing agency and were a package deal for $17,000 or $8,500 each. The trucks were both used. One pickup has approximately 65,000 miles and the other 85,000 miles. Both pickups are pretty much identical.” said Dennis Brittain, Medford water and maintenance supervisor.

An unseasonable warm temperature in January has spur thoughts of new landscaping to the Grant County Bank. Large rocks boulders were added to different areas on the lawn this past week.
A prayer vigil for Henry Charles Kretchmar Jr., 83, of Medford will be 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2009, at St. Mary Catholic Church, Medford. Mass of Christian burial will be 10 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2009, at St. Mary Catholic Church. The Rev. Mike Wheelahan will officiate. Burial will be in Calvary Cemetery, Medford. Arrangements are by Hills-Ely Funeral Home, Medford. He was born April 10, 1925, near Medford to Henry and Anna Knoblauch Kretchmar and died Saturday, Jan. 10, 2009, at Park West Plaza Nursing Home, Wichita, Kan. He graduated from Medford High School in 1943. He served in the Army 45th Infantry in Fort Chaffee, Ark. He married Catherine Smithhisler June 1, 1950. She died Aug. 4, 2006. He and his family received the 1984 Farm Bureau Family of the Year award. He was also named FFA Farmer of the Year in 1979. He was a member of the Medford school board 12 years, serving as president four of those years. He was involved in Elks and Moose Lodges, Lions Club, Farm Bureau, Oklahoma Farmers Union and Cattleman’s Association. Surviving are one son, Doug Kretchmar of Harrah; two daughters, Mary Harvey of Knoxville, Tenn., and Cindy Kellick of Wichita; one sister, Esther Hess of Waverly, Kan.; five grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. In addition to his wife, Catherine, he was preceded in death by four brothers and two sisters. Memorials may be made through the funeral home P.O. Box 280, Medford, OK 73759, to St. Mary Catholic Church building fund or Calvary Cemetery.
Red Crosses placed on the lawn of the Grant County courthouse, honors several Medford service members, both active, retired, and deceased
A Grant County district #2 grader had a little problem getting through a washout northeast of Medford over the holidays.

2 pounds Ground Beef 1 small Onion, diced 1 small can chopped Black Olives 2 cups Tomato Sauce 1 pound can Black Beans 18 Corn Tortillas 2 pound box Velveeta Cheese, cubed 1 cup Beef Broth In a large skillet, brown ground beef with onion; drain off drippings. Stir in olives, tomato sauce and black beans; Cover and simmer. Lightly spray a 9 x 13 inch baking dish — begin to layer. First — half the corn tortillas, followed by half the meat mixture, then half the cheese; repeat. Pour beef broth over the two layers. Bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 45 minutes. Allow to stand 10 minutes before serving.
Medford EMS responded to a motorcycle accident three miles south of Manchester Saturday evening after an Edmond man, Philip R. Lawrence, 57, was southbound on Oklahoma 132 riding a 1997 Yamaha. According to the Oklahoma Highway Patrol accident report, investigated by trooper Steve Sparks, Lawrence failed to negotiate a curve and ran off the roadway to the right coming to rest in the west ditch. The reported stated Lawrence was ejected 3 feet. The cause of the accident listed as unsafe speed on a curve. Lawrence was transported to St. Mary’s regional Medical Center in Enid and admitted to I.C.U Saturday evening with head, Trunk and internal injuries and his condition was listed as serious.
A $500 reward is being offered for information leading to the identification of whoever was responsible for glass damage to several downtown Pond Creek buildings last weekend. The windows were damaged the evening of Dec. 27 or early Dec. 28. Tim Barwick, city marshal, said the damage most likely was caused by a BB gun or pellet gun. Damage is estimated at $3,000 or more, he said. “They are large windows, so they are going to run at least $200 a window,” Barwick said. “There were about 14 or 15 windows damaged.” No homes or vehicles were damaged. “They were all commercial property and school,” Barwick said. Anyone with information is asked to call Pond Creek Police Department at 532-4500 or Grant County Sheriff’s Office at 395-2356. Callers may remain anonymous.
Regena Pauline Janzen The funeral for Regena Pauline Janzen, 95, of Medford, will be 11 a.m. Monday, Dec. 29, 2008, at Deer Creek Mennonite Church, Deer Creek. The Revs. Bobby Smith and Travis Janzen will officiate. Burial will be in Medford Mennonite Cemetery, Medford. Arrangements are by Hills-Ely Funeral Home, Medford. Visitation will be 1-7:30 p.m. today at the funeral home, with the family present from 6-7:30 p.m. She was born Nov. 15, 1913, in Turpin to Abram J. and Marie Weins Isaac and died Friday, Dec. 26, 2008, at Integris Bass Baptist Health Center. She attended school at Floris. She married Marvin W. Janzen Oct. 15, 1939. They made their home near Medford. She was a homemaker and farm wife. She was active in Mennonite Ladies Aid. Surviving are her husband, Marvin of the home; one daughter, Vivian Cooper of Broken Arrow; two sons, Duaine Janzen of Okmulgee and Argyle Janzen of Medford; seven grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by two sisters and four brothers. Memorials may be made through the funeral home, P.O. Box 280, Medford, OK 73759, to Community Health Center, Wakita.
A memorial service for Loren Junior Anthony, 81, of Medford, will be 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 30, 2008, at Church of the Nazarene, Medford. The Revs. Stuart A. Johnson, Bobby Smith and Rick Talley will officiate. Cremation has taken place. Burial will be in Rosemound Cemetery, Medford. The Army will conduct military rites. Arrange-ments are by Hills-Ely Funeral Home, Medford. He was born Nov. 11, 1927, in Greenfield, Kan., to Loren L. and Goldie L. Algire Anthony and died Friday, Dec. 26, 2008. He attended Medford Schools. He joined the Merchant Marine at age 15, before he became a sergeant in the Army. He married Wanda Lyon July 13, 1953, in Wellington, Kan. They made their home in Medford, where he worked in farming and as a painter for Joe Kretchmar. He was a member of Medford Church of the Nazarene. Surviving are his wife, Wanda of Medford; one son, Loren Phillip Anthony of Wichita, Kan.; and two sisters, Bessie Hagameir of Napa, Idaho, and Peg Schwettmann of Texas. He was preceded in death by one brother and one daughter. Memorials may be made through the funeral home, P.O. Box 280, Medford, OK 73759, to Medford Church of the Nazarene.
The Medford fire department responded to a reported electrical fire located at the Kay Electric sub-station on Numa Road and SH 11, east of Medford Saturday afternoon.

A transformer failed, leaving several customers without power for over an hour.

“A OG&E line feeds into Kay Electric’s sub-station” said Ron Miller OG&E Rep.. “But none of our customers were effected, said Miller.

Miller responded to the sub-station after the fire was turn into the Grant County Sheriff department, to make sure OG&E equipment was not the source for the problem.

After Kay-Electric crews arrived, they confirm Miller’s evaluation that a transformer had failed. Stating they did not know how many Kay-Electric customers were without power, but only the customers south of the station are affected.

This missing man from Pond Creek has been found in Mo. and is being taken to a hospital.
essie May Slayter Boehm was born on Aug. 10, 1915, in Cozad, NE, and passed from this earth at the age of 93 on Dec. 18, 2008, in Medford, OK, where she resided. At the age of five she moved to Broadwater, NE, until she left for college. She attended Bethany Peniel College (now Southern Nazarene University) in Bethany, OK, where she met and married her late husband, Earl Boehm.She is preceded in death (1989) by her husband, W. Earl Boehm, her parents, John Slayter and Ruby Kate Slayter, her brother, Marcus Lee Slayter, and her brother-in-law, Holman Tims.Jessie May Slayter Boehm married W. Earl Boehm on Sept. 29, 1937. They had no birth children, but always thought of their nieces and nephews as their children. Jessie is survived by her sister-in-law, Edna Mary Boehm Tims of Medford, OK; and nieces, Marilyn Tims Olson and husband, Jim of Oklahoma City, and Madelyn Tims Campbell and husband, Tim of Bethany, OK, Carol Hall and husband, Bill of Napa Valley, CA, Margaret Pearson Ramsey of CA; nephew, Montie Tims and wife, Eileen of Houston, TX; and great-niece, Brenda Pettus and husband, David of Wichita, KS; great-great nephews, Ian Reaves, Michael Tims and wife, Tara, Chris Tims and wife, Angi, Aaron Campbell, Stuart Campbell; and great-great-nieces, Jamie Smith and husband, Brian, Lisa Lang and husband, Eric, Dana Bellows and husband, Reuben, Jennifer Spence and husband, Brian, and Sara Campbell; and 10 great-great-great-nieces and nephews.Jessie was a homemaker and a support to her husband, Earl, in his cabinet and woodworking business. Together they lived in Childress, TX; Grand Island, NE; Enid, OK, and retired in Medford, OK, 38 years ago. The couple enjoyed a lifelong love of music. They both sang and played. They were members of a local SAMs Camping Club and enjoyed many hours traveling, cooking out and music together. Along with a group of Enid couples, they toured the nation including Yosemite National Park, Disneyland and Epcot Center in Florida. In both the Enid and Medford Nazarene Church, Jessie was very involved in the work of missions, Sunday School and in the Womens Christian Temperance Union. For more than 25 years she ministered to people and led a Bible study at the Medford Care Center. It was that same center, now Servant Living Center, where she resided for the last four years. She was a member and attended every function at the Medford Church of the Nazarene. In addition she was part of all of their large family gatherings for every holiday.Services will be 1:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 26, 2008, at Medford Church of the Nazarene. Internment will be in Memorial Park Cemetery, Enid, OK. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be made to Medford Church of the Nazarene through Hills Ely Funeral Home, 580-395-3848.(Paid Obit 12-21-1)
Grant County law-enforcement, wildlife officers, OHP, and other concern citizens are searching for a missing elderly Pond Creek man Floyd Roberts,81 104 S Erie Dr. Roberts is driving a 2005 white Jeep Liberty Tag Number GTP 841 and went missing Saturday. Anyone seeing the Jeep Liberty or Roberts is asked to contact the Grant County sheriff office.
Christmas break begins December 22 thru Jan. 2. Classes resume Monday Jan. 5th.
Waterfowl Report for December 10, 2008 For zone maps and complete waterfowl hunting regulations log on to wildlifedepartment.com Northwest Canton: Lake level is 0.91 ft. below normal. Habitat condition is fair on the lake. High water levels throughout the spring have limited native forage growth in the shallow portions of the lake. Winter wheat plantings are in fair condition. Row crops in the area have been harvested and are in good to excellent condition. Duck numbers are moderate, with a good number of dabbling ducks. Goose numbers are moderate. The boat ramp west of the WMA headquarters is usable as are all boat ramps on the south side of the lake. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawdown is nearly complete. Ft. Supply: Lake level is 0.18 ft above normal. Habitat conditions are fair, with good wheat conditions in the area. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are fair. Bird movement has increased with cooler weather. Southwest Ft. Cobb: Lake level is 0.25 ft above normal. Habitat condition is fair. Crops around the area are in fair condition. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are high. Birds have been moving to the peanut fields north and east of the lake. Hackberry: Refuge reservoir is approximately 4 foot below conservation pool. Habitat conditions are fair, with some wild millet in the area. Winter wheat in the area is in fair condition. Duck numbers are fair, with mainly green-wing teal present. Goose numbers are good. Due to lack of rain fall water is limited at Hackberry Flat WMA. Little River NWR: Food conditions in the area are good. Duck numbers: mallard 340; gadwall 250; wood duck 275. No geese observed in the area. Mtn. Park: Lake level is 3.25 ft. below normal. Habitat condition is fair. Winter wheat is fair in the area. Duck numbers are fair, with a large number of ducks using the wetland units. Goose numbers are low. Waurika: Lake level is 0.50 ft. below normal. Habitat condition is good around the lake. Wheat is fair in surrounding areas. Wetland units in the area have good flooded vegetation. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are fair. Bird movement in the area has been increasing. Northeast Copan: Lake level is normal. Habitat condition is fair. Flooded native plants on wetland units are in fair condition, with corn fields on the Wildlife Management Area in good condition. Plenty of flooded vegetation present to hold birds. Duck numbers are high, with an increase in mallards since the last survey. Goose numbers are moderate. Bird movement is increasing with every frontal passage. Eufaula: Lake level is 0.81 ft. below normal. Current habitat condition is poor. Very little farming in the area. Duck numbers are low. No geese observed. No significant bird movement was noticed in the area. Ft. Gibson: Lake level is 1.24 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is good, with smartweed, barnyard grass, and some agricultural crops in the area. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement has been increasing with colder weather. Hulah: Lake level is normal. Flooded native plants on wetland units are in fair condition. Wheat fields on the Wildlife Management Area are in good condition. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. A increase in birds is expected with the recent large cold front. Kaw: Lake level is 0.43 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is poor. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement has been minimal. Keystone: Lake level is 0.62 ft. above normal. Habitat conditions are poor, except at Cottonwood Creek WDU which is in fair condition. Both duck and goose numbers are low. Duck numbers though are fair on Cottonwood Creek WDU. Moderate duck movement has been reported in the area. Hunters using the area this year should be prepared for very deep mud. Caution should be taken, especially if hunting alone. Oologah: Lake level is 2.45 ft. below normal. Current habitat conditions are poor, with no flooded millet. Ag fields around lake are in poor condition due to flood conditions this past summer. Duck numbers are poor to fair, with gadwalls, mallards, ring-neck, and wigeon seen in the area. Goose numbers are low. Fair waterfowl migration expected over the next several weeks with each northern frontal passage. Sooner: Lake level is 0.5 ft below normal. Habitat conditions are poor, with winter wheat around the area in poor condition. Duck numbers are fair, with mostly mallard, gadwall and scaup. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area has been fair, with more expected in coming northern front. Remember no hunting during the waterfowl season split December 1 – 12. Webbers Falls: Lake level is 2.04 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is good, with smartweed, barnyard grass, bidens, cut soybeans, corn, milo and wheat in the area. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement has been increasing with colder weather. Southeast Grassy Slough: Large unit is dry, with the other units very low. Habitat condition is poor. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. No bird movement seen in the area. Hugo: Lake level is 0.58 ft above normal. Habitat condition is fair, with native plants and some winter wheat in the area. Duck numbers are good. Goose numbers are low. Hunter activity is low, with fair success. Mallard numbers have increased greatly over the last couple weeks, with the second half of the season shaping up to be good. Red Slough: Some units are now full, with other units still very low. Habitat condition is fair. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are low. No reports of bird movement in the area. Sequoyah NWR: Food conditions in the area are good. Duck numbers: mallard 17,535; gadwall 467; green-winged teal 105; wigeon 48; shoveler 16; wood duck 10. Goose numbers: Canada 97; snow 13,500. Texoma: Lake level is 1.47 ft. below normal. No food sources flooded at current lake levels. All Japanese Millet plantings were lost to flooding in the summer. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. With current food conditions hunting efforts should coincide with weather fronts. Wister: Lake level is normal. Habitat conditions are poor. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area has been slow.
Gonzales Construction employees are shown clearing the sidewalk at the Grant County Bank after the first snowfall of the winter season. A reported 3.5 inches fell, Dec.9th, 2008.

Mrs. Claus made a special appearance during the Busy Mom’s annual Christmas Dinner for area senior citizens‘.

OSBI To Investigate Assault A neighborhood assault that occurred in the two hundred block of North 5th street, the weekend of Thanksgiving has been turned over to the OSBI for investigation. “The investigation of this assault has been turned over to our agency and three of our investigators were in Medford Monday doing interviews,” said Jessica Brown, Public Information officer for the OSBI. “We will have more information to release as soon as our agents interview everyone who was involved or have information concerning the assault,” said Brown
A pre-Christmas snowfall arrived in Medford this morning bring with it all the joys of Christmas.
Batten down the hatches, Grant County The National Weather Service has issued a wind advisory for most of western Oklahoma, which also extends into the Texas panhandle and central Kansas. A wind advisory with sustained winds of 30 to 40 mph, was issued by the NWS in Norman at 9:52 a.m. and remains in effect until 3 p.m. Wind gusts may exceed 50 mph. The hightest wind gust was recorded by Mesonet at 46 mph. Strong winds could make driving difficult, especially for high-profile vehicles, and motorists are urged to use extra caution. The NWS also advises residents to secure lawn furniture, trash cans and any other lightweight items stored outside.
A wakita youth received injuries Sunday morning after loosing control of a 2001 Ford F150 pickup on a county road one mile west and .8 tenths of a mile north of Wakita.

According to OHP Trooper Caleb Swickey of the Garfield county

Detachment. Billy James Clark, 17, was southbound on the county road ran off the roadway to the left rolled 1 and a half times.

The driver was ejected from the vehicle, from the point of impact an unknown distance.

Clark was transported to Bass Hospital by Medford EMS and was admitted in stable condition at that time with head, trunk, external, arm and leg injuries.

The cause of the accident is listed as unsafe speed for the type of roadway.

Seat belts were equipped but not in use at the time of the accident. Airbags did deployed, according to the report.

Waterfowl Report for November 26, 2008 For zone maps and complete waterfowl hunting regulations log on to wildlifedepartment.com Northwest Canton: Lake level is 0.12 ft. below normal. Habitat condition is fair on the lake. High water levels throughout the spring have limited native forage growth in the shallow portions of the lake. Winter wheat plantings are in fair to good condition. Row crops in the area have been harvested and are in good to excellent condition. Duck numbers are moderate, with a good number of dabbling ducks. Goose numbers are moderate. Hunting activity is low to moderate, with moderate success. The boat ramp west of the WMA headquarters is usable as are all boat ramps on the south side of the lake. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers advised this week that they are beginning a drawdown of Canton Lake to 1 ft. below normal pool level, to accommodate a construction project that is beginning in the Dam area. The drawdown should be completed by early next week. Ft. Supply: Lake level is 0.06 ft above normal. Habitat conditions are fair, with good wheat conditions in the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area has been slow. The area is closed to hunting activity November 22 to November 30.
Five hundred Christmas trees from Kopp Forest in Neillsville WI. Made a quick stop at the Jiffy Tripp in Medford, Tuesday morning Nov. 25, on their way to happy Oklahoma homes for Christmas. Kopp said he already had 800 miles on this trip and the Christmas trees were being delivered to Enid.

Traffic may soon be open on west Oklahoma Street in Medford. Medford city employees and Grant County district 1, Max Hess’s county Commissioner crews were working Friday adding three tubs to rebuild a new bridge crossing.

The bridge was closed several months ago because of erosion and fear for unsafe traffic, according to city officials.

A new vending machine is now located in the Lion's park.

Rick Weber, Waukomis, is shown stocking the new vending machine in Lion's Park last week.

Rick Weber attended the Medford regular council meeting this month and was granted access to placing a vending location in Medford's Lion's park.

“This is a small project I have started for my kids,” said Rick Weber. “We have three more vending locations, one in Waukomis, Pond Creek and Enid. My kids is starting to get older now and needing money and I thought this might be a good project for them. I feel kids now days need to be keep busy.”

The location is on the south-side of the Lion's pavilion. Soda's and bottle water is sold for 50 cents each.

A benefit barbecue and pie auction is set for 6 p.m. Friday Nov. 21st in the Women's Building at the Grant County Fairgrounds in Pond Creek to raise funds for Steve and Melonie Stinson, who lost their restaurant to a fire last Wednesday morning.
'Tis the Beginning of the Season

Silver bells, candy canes, and bright colored lights will soon be embellishing the city streets of Medford, as the Holidays are upon us.

Heath Cripe and Don Curl, city employees took advantage of the unseasonable 70’s degree temperature Wednesday Nov. 19th by setting up the Christmas decorations on the Grant County courthouse lawn, prepareing for the annual Lighting Ceremony this Sunday night Nov. 23 starting at 6:30 p.m.

Pond Creek’s newest restaurant, Greazy Steve’s Food Prep Co. owned by Steve and Melonie Stinson, Medford, was short lived. What was to start out as the second day of operation instead started out as a fire call for Pond Creek, Medford and Nash fire department responding to the structure fire at 4:11 a.m.

“We received the fire call a 4:11 and when we arrived flames were already coning out of the back of the storage shed of the restaurant,” said Linda Golden, Pond Creek fire chief. “Tim Barwick said he heard a loud “POP” and saw sparks coming from the electrical pole line gong to the storage shed,” said Golden. “We are saying the fire is electrical.”

The flames spread from the storage shed into the false ceiling and from there through out the building causing a total loss too the structure.

Deer gun season opens Nov. 22 With several exceptional bucks already harvested this year by archery and muzzleloader hunters, the Nov. 22 opener of deer gun season looks promising as thousands of men, women and children will head to the woods and fields for the biggest hunting day of the year. Two years ago, deer gun hunters made state history with a record gun season harvest of 72,263 deer. That total contributed to a combined season harvest record of 119,349 deer, over 18,000 more deer than in 2005, and more than 17,000 more deer than the previous combined season harvest record set in 2000. Last year, the total harvest was down slightly, but two state records were taken during the gun season. Hunters participating in the 16-day deer gun season will have from Nov. 22 through Dec. 7 to harvest up to one antlered and two antlerless deer. If a hunter harvests two antlerless deer, at least one must be taken in antlerless zone 2. A map of antlerless deer zones as well as dates open to antlerless deer hunting are available on page 21 of the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide,” available anywhere hunting licenses are sold, or on the Wildlife Department’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com. Resident deer gun hunters must have a hunting license and a fishing and hunting legacy permit or proof of exemption to hunt deer in Oklahoma. In addition, they must possess a deer gun license (antlered or antlerless) or proof of exemption for each deer hunted. Resident youth hunters age 16 or 17 years old must purchase a hunting license and a deer gun license for each deer hunted, unless exempt. Resident youth under 16 years of age are exempt from the purchase of a hunting license and fishing and hunting legacy permit, but they must purchase a deer gun license for each deer hunted. Unless exempt, all hunters under 18 years of age must possess a valid deer gun license, but they have the option of purchasing a $10 youth deer gun license (antlered or antlerless) rather than the $20 deer gun license. Additionally, those youth who did harvest a deer during the youth deer gun season can still hunt during the regular deer gun season as long as they can stay within their legal annual combined limit of six deer, of which only two may be antlered. Nonresident deer hunters are exempt from a hunting license, but they must possess a nonresident deer gun license (antlered, antlerless or combination) for each deer hunted and a fishing and hunting legacy permit, or proof of exemption. Holders of nonresident lifetime hunting and lifetime combination licenses are not exempt from purchasing deer licenses. Those ages 10-35 who have not completed a hunter education course can purchase an apprentice-designated hunting license and go deer hunting with an accompanying adult who is a licensed hunter age 21 or older and who possesses a certificate of hunter education. Persons 21 years old or older who are exempt from either hunter education or hunting license requirements may also accompany an apprentice hunter. Youths age 9 and under must successfully complete a hunter education course to hunt deer in Oklahoma. Upon successfully harvesting a deer, annual license holders must complete the Record of Game section of the universal license, and all license holders, including lifetime license holders, must immediately attach their name and license number to the carcass. What the hunter attaches can be anything, as long as it contains the hunter's name and hunting license number and remains securely attached to the animal until it is checked at a hunter check station or with an authorized Wildlife Department employee. All successful hunters must check their deer at the nearest hunter check station. A county-by-county listing of hunter check stations is provided in this year's Hunting Guide, and the most up-to-date check station listing is available at wildlifedepartment.com. Lance Meek, hunter education coordinator for the Wildlife Department, reminds deer gun hunters to put safety first while deer hunting. “Remember to apply what you’ve learned in your hunter education course, and you should have a safe, rewarding hunting season,” Meek said. “Remember to wear the appropriate amount of hunter orange clothing, secure your treestands properly and know your target and what lies beyond your target in all situations.” All deer gun hunters must conspicuously wear both a head covering and an outer garment above the waistline consisting of daylight fluorescent orange color totaling at least 400 square inches. Camo-fluorescent orange is legal as long as the total orange meets or exceeds the required 400 square inches. “One final safety tip for deer gun hunters, or any deer hunters for that matter, is to wear a safety harness while hunting from a treestand,” Meek said. Safety harnesses are available at sporting goods dealers that sell hunting equipment. Hunting hours during deer gun season are one-half hour before official sunrise to one-half hour after official sunset. For additional regulations, antlerless zones, check station locations, season dates and a wealth of other information, be sure to pick up a copy of the “2008-09 Oklahoma Hunting Guide" available at all license dealer locations, or log on to wildlifedepartment.com.
John Wright, Medford, was brought before Judge Jack Hammontree Thursday morning after an outstanding warrant was served for drug charges. Wright sat jittery in his wheel chair as he listened to Judge Hammontree ask if he understood and had read over the charges concerning the felony and misdemeanor counts. Wright answered he understood. At one point Wright protested, the amount of bond saying it should be reduced because he had to stay at home for nearly 30 days waiting for the warrant to be served, instead of being arrested the night of the search warrant. Judge Hammontree did reduce the bond from 7,000 to 4,500 saying Wright had never missed a bond appearance in the past. However, the charges was too serious for an OR bond to be issued. Wright also seemed concerned, asking the Judge where he was going to be keep because of the Grant County jail not being handicapped accessible. Judge Hammontree answered he did not know. Wright interred a Not guilt plea saying he would hire an attorney. His next bond appearance is sat for Dec. 16. After Wright left the courtroom, Grant County Deputy Jeremy Brittain escorted him to the Grant County Jail
Personal injury incident occurred at 1340 hours 11/11/2008, on private property 1 mile south of the Oklahoma/Kansas state line and 1 tenth mile east of M&M road in Grant county. A 1979 Case 1570 tractor driven by Jerry Lee Oliver, WM, 25 yoa, address Caldwell, Ks. was transported by Medford EMS to Caldwell Hospital. Transferred via Eagle Med to St Francis Hospital in Wichita, Kansas. Admitted in serious condition with internal trunk, arm and leg injuries. The driver was trying to start the tractor outside the drivers area. The tractor was in gear and took off with driver outside drivers compartment traveling 24 feet causing the driver to fall and was ran over by the tractors back tire.
The Associated Press has declared incumbent Republican Frank Lucas winner of Oklahoma’s District 3 Congressional race. The Roger Mills County rancher was leading with more than 71 percent of the votes, with 192 of 571 precincts reporting. Medford Democrat Frankie Robbins had 21 percent and Independent Forrest Michael 7 percent.
Highway 11 at the junction of 132 was blocked to traffic Saturday evening for several hours after a semi hauling a large steel tube was unable to make the turn from 132 onto SH 11.

Hawley and Nash fire departments in route to a mutual aide response for the Nascatunga fire department to a grass fire, had to be detoured north.

Enid diesel wrecker service from Enid attempted to adjust the steel tube back on the trailer although their first attempt broke their chains and they left the scene.

In an attempt to contact trooper Steve Sparks via phone call in obtaining further information concerning the semi my telephone calls were not returned.

The DCLA 3rd grade class of Mrs. Oma Lea Rogers visited the Medford nursing home Monday evening handing out Halloween cards the class made for the nursing home residents.

Pictured is Mrs. Rogers and class member Ashlynn Belin giving resident Harry Frieouf a special card from the class.

Waterfowl seasons in full swing Nov. 1 Duck season opened in the Panhandle and most of northwest Oklahoma in October and will kick off for the rest of the state Nov. 1, as will goose season. “The federal framework sets our guidelines for the season, and then we set our season according to our situation,” said Alan Peoples, chief of Wildlife for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. “This year nothing really has changed. We’re going back to the same seasons we had last year, only adjusting the calendar dates.” In zone 1 (most of northwest Oklahoma), the first half of the duck season runs through Nov. 30, with the second half running Dec. 13 - Jan. 18, 2009. Pintail and canvasback season will be open through Nov. 30, and then re-opened Dec. 13 - Dec. 14. In zone 2, the duck season runs Nov. 1-30 and Dec. 13 - Jan. 25, 2009. Pintail and canvasback season will open Dec. 18 and run through Jan. 25, 2009. Panhandle counties offer the longest duck season, have been open since Oct. 11 and will remain open through Jan. 7, 2009. Pintail and canvasback season for the Panhandle counties will be open through Nov. 18. Hunters are allowed a daily limit of six ducks combined, no more than five of which can be mallards. Of those, only two mallards may be hens. No more than two scaup, two wood ducks and two redheads may be included in the daily limit, and no more than one pintail and one canvasback may be included during the specified time period in each of the established duck seasons. The statewide Canada goose season will run Nov. 1-30 and Dec. 13 - Feb. 15, 2009. The daily limit is three birds. The season for white-fronted geese will run Nov. 1-30 and Dec. 13 - Feb. 6, 2009, with a daily bag limit of one bird. The regular season for light geese (snows, blues and Ross’) will run Nov. 1-30 and Dec. 13 - Feb. 15, 2009, with a daily bag limit of 20. Sandhill crane season will run through Jan. 25, 2009, west of I-35 only. The daily limit is three birds. With waterfowl season already underway in parts of Oklahoma, hunters looking for an edge need to look no further than the resources provided by the Wildlife Department. Bi-weekly e-mail reports from top waterfowling areas, a comprehensive “2008-09 Oklahoma Waterfowl Guide” and a frequently updated Web site help ensure hunters get the most accurate, timely and useful duck and geese hunting information available. “We work very hard to serve as a useful resource for our state’s sportsmen,” said Nels Rodefeld, information and education chief for the Wildlife Department. “Our biologists work hard to provide information that is important to outdoorsmen, and we make sure it is easily accessible. We hope waterfowlers will find the information we provide this year to be an important part of their hunting season
A Pond Creek/Hunter student and her mother have been charged in Grant county district court after a prescription drug Acetaminophen Hydrocodone (Lora tabs) were frond in a candy dispenser by a Pond Creek teacher. Stephanie Michelle Matlock, 18, Hunter was charged with two counts of possession of controlled substance without having a valid prescription or medical need for the controlled substance. In addition, obstruction of an officer. Barbara Matlock Devries, 53, Hunter has been charged with obstruction of an officer. According to the affidavit, on Oct. 20 at about 9:15 in Government class a teacher Darin Jones noticed an orange mint container on Matlock’s desk. When Mr. Jones looked inside the container, he noticed several mints as well as several pills that looked like prescription medication.. Jones asked Matlock if it was her container and according to the affidavit, she stated yes. According to the affidavit, after several false statements were made by both mother and daughter concerning the drug, both Stephanie Matlock and Barbara Devries were charged and bond has been set at $500 for each misdemeanor count.
A quick candid picture is taken of Father Mike a few minutes before the parade giving Rosie a last grooming.
An accident Sunday afternoon one and a half miles south of the Grant and Garfield county line on highway 132 sent a Nash woman, Devora Stegall, 50 to an Enid hospital where she was treated and released.

According to the accident report at the scene by trooper Steve Sparks. Stegall was south bound on 132 when she hit the west side banister of a bridge rail continued across the bridge hitting it two more time before rolling on the south end of the bridge. The pickup caught fire where the fire spread to a near by pasture. Fire department from Hillsdale, Pond Creek, Nash, and Hawley respond to grass fire. Stegall was transported to Enid hospital by the Pond Creek EMS department.

When Turning Back the Clock, Change Batteries in Smoke Alarms, This weekend, the time will fall back one hour. It is a great time to change the batteries on two important pieces of home safety equipment — smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. Smoke Detector Tips All batteries should be replaced at least once a year and tested monthly. Also, cobwebs and dust should be vacuumed away monthly. Smoke alarms become less sensitive over time. They should be replaced every 10 years. If they've been painted, they also should be replaced. If they beep periodically, it's a signal that the batteries need to be changed. Even though the beeping is annoying, the battery should never be removed until you have a new one and are ready to replace it. Carbon Monoxide Detectors Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas that is poisonous to animals and people because it displaces oxygen in the blood. It is produced by the incomplete burning of fuels. Every year, more than 200 people in the United States die from carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide detectors are important throughout the year, but especially as temperatures get cooler because faulty heating systems cause a spike in deaths from the dangerous gas. Carbon monoxide can kill entire families while they sleep. If everyone in the house has the same symptoms, they should leave and seek medical attention. At night, however, the only protection is a carbon monoxide detector that is listed with Underwriter's Laboratories. Like smoke alarms, the batteries should be tested monthly and replaced yearly.
Did you know that you can vote early at the Courthouse instead of waiting until Tuesday? Here are the times. Friday, October 31st 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday, November 1st 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Monday, November 3rd 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Hallejujah Night will be held Oct 31 from 6 to 8:30 at the civic center
Medford Homecoming parade will start at 11:00 Saturday morning Oct 25th. This year to celebrate the classes ending in 3 and 8.

The city of Medford welcomes a new Reserve officer to their police force this past week.

Officer Jim Shepherd moved to Medford two years ago from Choctaw, Oklahoma to take a correctional officer position at James Crabtree Correctional Facility in Helena, Oklahoma, where Shepherd is employed full time.

Shepherd recently completed 16 weeks of CLEET, making him a certified officer.

He is married to a local Medford girl Sheila Robbins and is the proud father of 5-year-old Ethan, 1-year-old Samuel, and is expecting a baby in March.

Jim is currently an EMT Basic on the Medford Ambulance Service, a member of the Medford Fire Department, and is a member of the emergency response team at the prison.

A big move for the Medford Public Library may be in the future if Medford council members choose to accept the generous offer from Joe Kretchmar in accepting the building he owns on North Front St., which once housed the Natural Resource Conservation Services.

Medford council members and city manager Dea Kretchmar toured the building Tuesday evening during their regular council meeting. Kretchmar said Tuesday Joe Kretchmar offered to donate the building to the city for the library.

The building vacated after high levels of Radon gases were discovered at the facility. Kretchmar said the owner believes he has taken proper action in cleaning up the air quality inside the building. Air quality testing will be conducted again to make sure, Kretchmar said.

The council tabled any action on accepting the building, it will be discuss during next months meeting.

Meet the Candidates will be held Monday, October 20th at 7:00 p.m. in the Congregation Place, 304 N. Main. All candidates have been invited to attend and the Farm Bureau will be providing refreshments. Mark your calendars and please try to attend.
Charges were filed in Grant country district court October 15 on John William Wright, 42, Medford, after a search warrant was served at his home at 624 North Front St. Medford by the Grant county Sheriff’s department, Trooper Cottrill and the Medford PD. Wright has been charged with felony counts of Possession of controlled substance, (marijuana), Possession of controlled substance (Methamphetamine) and on misdemeanor count of unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia. A motion to revoke a suspended sentence also a felony, was also filed October 15 on two other convection where Wright entered a plea of guilty in 2004 on two felony charges of possession of a controlled substance. The motion further states that Wright is in violation of the terms and conditions of his probation.
Halloween has officially begun in Grant County after the discovery of an abandon car a mile north of Medford on US 81, Saturday afternoon.

Grant county deputies were called to the scene of what was first thought to be an accident, but later discovered the car was missing a battery and fan belt and could not have been driven there.

Un-official information stated the car had been parked at Renfrow as a disabled vehicle and thought to have been brought to the location as a prank.

Pictured;

Grant County Deputy Mike Payne and Medford police officer Chris Ferrell are pictured investigating the mysterious vehicle that appeared Saturday afternoon one mile north of Medford.

Any further information will be added to the article.

Medford Chamber of Commerce will have a “Meet the Candidates” night at 7 p.m. Oct. 20 at Congregation Place, 304 N. Main St. The public is invited to listen to area candidates speak about local, state and national topics before the upcoming November election.

A pickup stolen from Schatz Underground, Enid, rolled at 4-Corners Friday morning around 6:20 a.m. north of the US 60 and US 81 junction.

According to an Oklahoma Highway Patrol report, Zachary Alexis Kraker, 31, was northbound on US 81 and continued through the intersection losing control of the Schatz 2001 Ford pickup..

Kraker was transported to St. Mary’s by Pond Creek EMS and was admitted in stable condition.

The cause of the accident was listed as to fast of speed for the roadway. An order of alcohol was detected on the driver by the trooper.

Youth deer gun season offers young hunters first shot Young Oklahoma hunters the chance at a buck and a doe before the rush during the youth deer gun season Oct. 17-19. “We want to attract youth to the sport of hunting, because they are the future of the sport and the future of conservation in Oklahoma , and giving them their own deer gun season is a great way to get them involved and out afield with a mentor,” said Colin Berg, education supervisor for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. Last year was the first year youth were allowed to harvest both a buck and a doe during the youth season. Previously, the season was only open antlerless deer hunting. “We are always working to provide better hunting opportunities to sportsmen, and setting up the season so that youth can harvest a buck or a doe during youth deer gun season makes for a better chance at harvesting a deer and brings more excitement to the hunt,” Berg said. The youth season is open to hunters under 18 years of age. Youth hunters must be accompanied by a hunter 18 years or older. Youth hunting with an apprentice-designated license must be accompanied by a licensed hunter who is 21 years old or older who is hunter education certified or exempt. Oklahoma kids under the age of 16 are exempt from the purchase of a hunting license and legacy permit, and youth 16 or 17 years old can purchase a combination youth hunting and fishing license for $9 or a youth hunting license for $5. Unless they hold a lifetime hunting or combination license, all youth participants must purchase a $10 youth antlered deer gun license and/or a $10 youth antlerless deer gun license if they want a chance to harvest a buck and a doe. Nonresident youth hunters must possess a nonresident deer license, and those age 14-17 must also purchase a fishing and hunting legacy permit. Youth hunters who do not harvest a deer during the youth deer gun season may use their unfilled youth deer gun license during the regular deer gun season. Hunters who do harvest a deer during the youth deer gun season may purchase another youth deer gun license and harvest a deer during the regular gun season. Deer taken by hunters participating in the youth deer gun season are included in the hunter’s combined season limit. For complete information on the apprentice-designated hunting license, youth season regulations and season dates, pick up a copy of the “2007-08 Oklahoma Hunting Guide” or log onto wildlifedepartment.com. For those youth who do not have their hunter education certification, the Department is offering several courses before the season opens in communities across the state. Some require pre-registration. Log on to wildlifedepartment.com for more information on each available class.
Muzzleloader deer season nears While deer archery hunters are already afield hunting, hunters await the opening of the 2008 deer muzzleloader season slated for Oct. 25. Muzzleloader season spans nine days (Oct. 25 - Nov. 2). The modern gun season opens Nov. 22 and runs for 16 days. Archery season remains open through Jan. 15, 2009. From wide-open prairie to pine-covered mountains, deer call every part of Oklahoma home, and several wildlife management areas across the state offer hunting for at least part of the muzzleloader season, some through special draw hunts that give sportsmen a unique opportunity to change up their usual hunting routine. To learn more about deer hunting on wildlife management areas, consult the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide” or log on to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com. The Web site offers regulations, useful hunting information and an award-winning digital wildlife management area atlas. And best of all, it is free. In addition to detailed maps, sportsmen can find information such as camping locations and contacts for local biologists. During muzzleloader season, hunters can harvest a buck and two antlerless deer, and most of the state is open to antlerless hunting every day during the season. In addition to an appropriate hunting license and fishing and hunting legacy permit (unless exempt), resident muzzleloader hunters must possess a deer license for each deer harvested. If a hunter harvests two antlerless deer, at least one of those antlerless deer must be taken in antlerless zone two (consult page 21 of the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide for a map of antlerless zones). Nonresident muzzleloader hunters must also carry a fishing and hunting legacy permit and a nonresident deer muzzleloader license for each deer harvested. However, nonresidents are exempt from the purchase of a hunting license while hunting deer. Hunters can harvest a turkey with their muzzleloaders Nov. 1-2 in most of the state. A fall turkey license is required, unless exempt. Fall turkey gun season runs Nov. 1-21, and details on the season are available in the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide.” Hunters age 10-35 who have not completed hunter education can buy an apprentice-designated hunting license and hunt while accompanied by a licensed hunter 21 years old or older who has completed the hunter education course, or a licensed hunter 21 years old or older who is otherwise exempt from hunter education (includes those 36 years old or older, those honorably discharged or currently active in the Armed Forces or members of the National Guard). Hunters under 10 years old must complete a hunter education course to hunt big game or to buy any big game hunting license. For specific information regarding which areas are open to muzzleloader season, licenses, bag limits, blaze orange clothing requirements or legal firearms, consult the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide" or log onto wildlifedepartment.com.
1 roll Refrigerated Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough, room temperature 1 8-ounce Cream Cheese, room temperature 1 cup Powdered Sugar 3 cup Milk (or, Half and Half) 1 small box Instant Chocolate Pudding Mix 1 small box Instant Vanilla Pudding Mix 1 12-ounce tub Cool Whip, thawed, divided Pat the cookie dough into the bottom of a 9 x 13 inch pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes; cool. In a medium mixing bowl, beat cream cheese with powdered sugar until smooth. Fold in 1-3/4 cup Cool Whip. Spread this layer over the cooled cookie dough crust. In a large bowl, combine chocolate and vanilla pudding with the milk; whisk for 2-minutes to combine. Let pudding stand for another 2 minutes to allow it to begin setting up. Spread pudding over the cream cheese mixture. Top with remaining Cool Whip and if desired chopped nuts, mini-chocolate chips or chocolate curls. Lightly cover and chill until set.
Karl’s Apple Market and Medford’s volunteer fire department added a little extra enjoyment to the hunter’s education class which was held this weekend in Medford by Grant county game rangers.

Karl’s provided the food for the meal and Medford FD volunteered their Saturday morning to seeing the group received a warm welcome to Medford and was well fed.

A Medford home at 624 North Front Street in Medford was severed with a “No Knock” search warrant on the evening of September 30 by the Grant county sheriff’s department and Medford PD. The home is the residents of John William Wright. According to the search warrant affidavit, Alan Juhl, Medford assistant police chief was contacted by Medford police chief, Roger Christman that the Schwann’s driver had contacted him saying he had just observed what appeared to be drugs in John Wright’s house and had asked Christman to follow up on it. According to the affidavit, Juhl contacted the Schwann’s driver and he stated that he had been offered a “bong hit” and had personally observed what appeared to be a homemade bong with a tarry residue sitting on a counter next to the television. According to the affidavit, the Schwann’s driver was an 11-year law enforcement veteran. During the search of the resident in the living room was found, a small digital scales, what appeared to be marijuana stems and seeds, 5 bongs of various sizes and colors with residue from usage, 1 camel cigarette tin with broken glass ball inside, 1 rubber stopper with plastic tube attached, 1 wick, 1 pill splitter and 2 marijuana “roaches.” In the southeast bedroom found, according to court records, 1 bong made from prescription pill bottle, 1 crack pipe in plastic bottle, 1 small snap-open make-up style mirrow with white residue, 3 small glass pipes (used) 1 broken glass pipe (used, and 2 syringes. Charges are pending with, Steven Young, Grant County ADA.
On Sep 30th, Mr. Colmes dishonored the American military. During a heated conversation between Mr. Hannity and Mr. Colmes, Mr. Colmes mentioned that he wished that Congress would have voted against funding of the war.

Mr. Hannity, prior to Mr. Colmes’ ridiculous statement, mentioned that he (Mr. Hannity) believes that Barack Obama needed to apologize to the American military members for voting against the funding of the troops; because, in doing so, it put the military troops in harms way. It was then that Mr. Colmes made his statement.

I personally do not care if you are for the war or not; however, men and women are putting their lives on the line to protect American citizens, and we need proper funding. To have voted against the war, is to have sent American soldiers into a situation that puts them at a disadvantage. It put American soldiers at an unnecessary risk! All for what? Just to prove a point?

Thank God most Americans have backed the American military. They have stood strong and true, and provided prayers, packages, and love to every military member. WE thank you!

To Mr. Colmes, Barack Obama, and everyone else that either voted against the funding or wished Congress would have voted against it…you should be ashamed of yourself! AND, yes, I agree with Mr. Hannity…you do need to apologize to every American military member, their spouses, and to the family members that lost a soldier to whom provided the ultimate sacrifice.

Go here http://www.foxnews.com/hannityandcolmes/index.html and send an email to Mr. Colmes and let him know exactly what you think of his statements.

Once the local point for many Medford citizens, the old Senior Citizens Center on South Third is in the process of being demolished because of several years of neglect.

Many beautiful quilts were hand quilted in the southwest room, a very active ceramic shop was located in the kitchen with daily lessons for anyone that wish to learn the art of ceramics. Rousing cards parties were held in the main room. Different arts and crafts were shared with friends. The center was enjoyed by all ages not just seniors.

Rod Adams has recently purchase the property.

Medford emergency personal responded to a one-vehicle accident one an half miles north on M&M Sunday afternoon after a 1977 Dodge brakes lock-up.

According to the accident report by trooper Marion, the driver, Butch Inmon, Oklahoma City, was in the possess of moving the van back to OKC after the vehicle had been setting on a hunting lease for approximately two to three years.

The trooper stated, Inmon was southbound on M&M and he said when he hit his brake the wheels locked up and threw the van in the west ditch. The van then can out of the west ditch and crossed the blacktop rolling one and a half times coming to rest on the east side, in the field.

Trooper Marion stated an unsafe vehicle was the caused for the accident.

Inmon was transported to Bass hospital, treated, and released.

George Gilchrist was sentenced this morning in Grant county district court on felony and misdemeanor counts steaming from cruelty to animal charges. He received 5 years in the DOC with three years suspended plus all court and jail cost.
Local author releases new book Local Medford author, Amanda Ball, has released a new book. The book is called Marriage 101, and is written under the pen name Dayne Gearner. About the book: "Sometimes the thing you can't see, is the thing right in front of your eyes. For close friends Katherine Anderson and Steven Colby, the chance for a romantic relationship was a hurdle that was too big to climb--until Katherine needed a pretend husband, and Steven agreed to her ruse. Thrown together, in the company of strangers, they find that their pretend relationship doesn't need much pretending, and that real feelings are starting to grow." The novel is available as both a paperback and an ebook. "It's exciting to be a part of the ebook market," Amanda said. "There are so many innovations in the publishing industry, and it's nice to be able to offer readers modern versions of novels, that they can view electronically. But rest assured, the book is still available in paperback format, too." The book can be ordered online. See www.daynegearner.com for more details. Former Medford resident, Karen Ball, is a professional artist and the mother of Amanda, and she created the cover art for the novel. For more information on her work, see www.karenballartist.com Amanda Ball lives for creativity, and is active in the book business, the movie business, and the music business.
I am appalled at what I have seen and heard from the so-called “mainstream” media. I am now a believer that the “mainstream” media is no longer “mainstream”. It is so far to the left that it is absolutely scary. The Communist News Network (CNN) is the leader in bashing Gov Palin…followed quickly by NBC. Where has honest reporting of the news gone?

What about the so-called “Women” groups? When SEN Hillary Clinton was mauled by the media and absolutely trashed by SEN Obama, they were right there by her side defending her (liberal and conservative alike). They joined forces to protect the basic rights of SEN Clinton. Where are they now? GOV Palin is receiving worse treatment and most of the “Women” groups have abandoned GOV Palin. As a matter of fact, they are part of the bashing. This only proves that so-called “Women” groups that are supposed to be there for ALL women are only there for their own interest.

Are you tired of getting the Political Spin from both sides? I sure am! If our readers know of any website that is NEUTRAL on reporting facts, please send them to Medford Oklahoma Online. We have just over 50 days left, and I would like to compile a list of trusted websites that we all can go to that will provide facts on our future Leaders…so we can decide on our OWN who should be the next President and Vice-President.

Lamont town officials have issued a voluntary water boil advisory. Due to recent flooding, the town’s water system has been out of service. Anytime water pressure is lost, there is a potential for bacterial contamination, according to Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality. Some bottled water has been provided to residents, according to Anita Heusel, clerk-treasurer for the town. “We have some bottled water that has been given out, and the county commissioner is going to get more,” she said. To ensure water is safe for human consumption, water supplied by the town of Lamont should be boiled vigorously for at least one minute. Heusel said some people should be particularly careful. “Young children, the elderly and people with lowered immune systems are particularly susceptible and are advised to boil water,” she said. This voluntary boil advisory will remain in effect until Lamont provides adequate samples indicating the water is free from bacteria and there is adequate chlorine in the distribution system, according to DEQ. “The advisory is just until we get some samples to see if we have any problems,” Heusel said Wednesday. “The water samples were taken to Stillwater today.” Lamont residents are encouraged to conserve water until the water tower has been refilled. “We are asking them to conserve water in case something else happens,” Heusel said.
J.D. Jackson New Medford Crossing Guard

J.D. Jackson, a long time Medford resident was hired this year for the 2008-2009 school term as Medford's school crossing guard at Highway 11 and Hillcrest Dr.

He replaces Pat Woodson who retired last year after many many years of dedicated service to keeping the safely of our kids at all times.

J.D is taking over the role with big smiles and a vigorous hand wave.

Price Gouging Statute In Effect, AG Says Attorney General Drew Edmondson today said Oklahoma’s Emergency Price Stabilization Act is still in effect, and he warned businesses not to price gouge on goods and services in the wake of Hurricane Ike. Governor Brad Henry declared a State of Emergency in the days prior to Hurricane Gustav. The declaration was amended Sept.10. A declared State of Emergency allows Oklahoma to seek federal reimbursement for costs associated with housing storm evacuees. It also triggers the state’s Emergency Price Stabilization Act. According to the statute, prices cannot increase more than 10 percent above the price charged immediately prior to the declaration, unless the increase can be attributed to factors unrelated to the emergency and does not include any increase in profit to the seller. “This law applies not only to gasoline, but to any goods, services, dwelling units or storage space,” Edmondson said. “The statute restricts price increases for the duration of the declaration and 30 days after it expires. It extends for an additional 180 days for dwelling units, storage space and construction/repair work.” In May, Edmondson announced a settlement with the LaQuinta hotel chain that required the company to provide refunds and free room vouchers for consumers who overpaid for rooms during the December ice storm. “Most business owners play by the rules,” Edmondson said. “Most people in general will not take advantage of their fellow citizens in a crisis situation. Today’s warning should serve notice to those who may be considering the alternative.” Oklahomans can report possible violations to the attorney general’s office at (405) 521-2029.
Rains, Rescues, and Wire Shortages

The Medford FD was keep busy Friday morning, after heavy rains hit Grant County.

"At approximately 6:15 a.m. we were called to do a water rescue 1 mile north of town on 81. a lady in a small car had been washed off the roadway." said Dennis Brittain Medford Fire Chief. "We were able to drive the big 6x6 to her car and take her to safety on the way back to the station we got a call that someone was stranded in the water at the Medford city park on Cherokee, but we were canceled before we arrived on the scene. Fifteen minutes later. we received a called to assist Wakita FD. because their school was on fire. we sent three trucks but they called to stand down before we arrived. We were told they had it under control. While we were putting away the trucks and equipment a women came to the station and told us her house was on fire on West Oklahoma. On arrival a we found a short in the wiring on her wall heater, luckily it had gone out and not spread. We had just returned to the station when the pagers went off requesting an ambulance at the Medford Nursing home to transport a patient to Enid, all before 9:00 am. Brittain stated.

Picture

Medford FD arrived on the scene on West Oklahoma Friday morning when the wiring on a wall heater shorted out. The fire was out by the time the department arrived.

The following roadways are closed due to high water within Troop J

US81 between Medford & Pond Creek in Grant Co.

US81 between Renfrow & the Kansas Line in Grant Co.

SH11 West of Medford to Redhill Road 7 miles West of Medford in Grant Co.

US281 by Chester has high water in Major Co.

US412 1 mile East of Lahoma the outside lanes of Eastbound & Westbound are

under water in Garfield Co.

US412 from 4 miles West of Ringwood SH58/US412 to Bouse jct. US281/US412 in

Major Co.

SH45 West of Carmen closed due to flooding from EagleChief Creek cresting

In Alfalfa Co.

SH8b West of Aline closed due to flooding from EagleChief Creek cresting in

Alfalfa Co.

SH58 is closed from the SH45/SH58 Jct to the SH8/US64 Jct. in Alfalfa Co

Redhill Road between Medford & Pond Creek are closed due to high water in

Grant Co.

According to Mesonet at 3:30 p.m, Medford had received 5.39 inches of rain.

In the last 24 hours.

* forecasters are monitoring two weather systems that will produce heavy rain. First... a persistent plume of subtropical moisture will interact with a broad and slow moving frontal zone to produce excessive rain from far western North Texas up through western and northern Oklahoma. This band of rain may last from tonight through Friday night... resulting in 5 or more inches of rain locally... and the potential for significant flooding. The second episode of heavy rain will be associated with Hurricane Ike as it tracks through northeast Texas into southeast Oklahoma. Moisture around this large storm could reach as far as central Oklahoma and western North Texas. This moisture could coincide with the frontal zone to produce a band of very heavy rain... and additional flooding from Saturday night into Sunday. This is the most likely scenario at this time. If the track of Ike were to move farther east... the flooding threat would diminish... but a track farther west would make flooding more likely
Help Needed to Identify Body Sunday, a woman’s body was found on the banks of Lake Thunderbird in Cleveland County. Rangers with the Oklahoma Department of Tourism requested OSBI assistance in this case. The medical examiner is working to determine cause and manner of death. In the meantime, OSBI is trying to identify the woman. Much of the body was decomposed; however, a tattoo is distinguishable on the lower back of the woman’s body. If anyone has information about the tattoo, please call the OSBI hotline at 1-800-522-8017. Sunburst Tattoo
Miguel Rodriguez, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging substance abuse *Larry Allen Minton, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing based on disciplinary action in another state *Brian K. Rich, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing based on false statements and admission to theft *Dhyia Ibrahim Al Qutshan, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging sexual misconduct and probation/suspension from residency program *David Paul Crass, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging prescribing violations *Millard L. Henry, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging physical conduct with a patient which is sexual in nature *Paul A. Howard, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging physical conduct with a patient which is sexual in nature *Wesley E. Parkhurst, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging physical conduct with a patient which is sexual in nature *Kimberlee R. Mixon, P.A. – Disciplinary hearing alleging substance abuse and violation of probation *Johnny M. Fowler, Jr., M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging sexual misconduct *Linda Lucio, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging substance abuse *Paul J. Loop, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging substance abuse and disciplinary action in another state Announcements *David R. Mitchell, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing continued Friday, September 19, 2008 9:00 A.M. *Kenneth M. Duffy, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging disruptive behavior and prescribing
Chad Cink is pictured Monday evening along with Barbara Bush Medford City Clerk. Cink was appointed member at large by Medford council members Gary Bowen, Donna Frazier and Christy Clinage. Don Bowman Medford city mayor was absent.

The position was vacated after Brian Burright had missed three out of four meetings.

*****MEDIA ALERT***** The Oklahoma Highway Patrol has received numerous telephone calls from alarmed citizens that have received messages stating that there has been a serious, sometimes fatal accident on a highway, and that their phone number was listed on a cell phone found inside the vehicle involved in the crash. They are then instructed to dial an exact sequence of numbers beginning with *72. According to AT&T, *72 is a custom feature for call forwarding. When a customer dials *72 followed by a telephone number, the call forwarding feature is activated, causing all of the customer’s incoming calls to ring to another number. These calls can be forwarded to a land line or pay phone, and even override the inability of cell phones to accept collect calls. A third party will accept the charges for these calls, and they will be billed back to you, because your telephone number is where the forwarded calls originated. You may not even realize what has happened for several days. This latest scam is occurring in other states as well. If you receive one of these calls, do not call the number you are given. Please report these calls to your local law enforcement agency. AUTHORITY: CAPTAIN CHRIS WEST #39 PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE OKLAHOMA HIGHWAY PATROL
Three Medford residents Jeffery Jay Rodgers 222 South main, Kenneth Earl Allen, 609 South Front St. and Kevin Leon Richardson 224 South Front charged in Grant county district count Tuesday Sept 2 on one count of conspiracy, a misdemeanor. According to the affidavit signed by Medford officer Christopher Ferrell. Ferrell was dispatched to 208 South Park St. Aug. 18 at 12:26 p.m. where a malicious injury to property had occurred. Upon Officer Ferrell arrival according to the affidavit, he saw a red 2002 Chevrolet extended cab pickup with a camper shell that had its rear glass broken out. On the ground at the rear of the vehicle, there were pieces of glass and a children’s tri-cycle. Ferrell then spoke to the owner of the pickup Damian Irvin who told Ferrell that he was in his house when he heard a “crash”. When Irvin came out of the his residence, according to court records, he stated he saw Kevin Richardson and Kenny Allen in the alley across from his house and that he heard the voice of Jeffery Rogers. Irvin then stated that the three men began to yell at him and headed east down the alley out of site. The affidavit stated Irvin then called the sheriff’s office. If convicted this crime is punishable by a fine of up to $500 or imprisonment in the county jail for up to one year or both.
Greener Fairways

The fairways at Medford’s nine hole Golf Course will be a lot greener in coming years.

“We are installing new sprinkler heads on the water lines so we will be able to water the golf course fairways,” said Dea Kretchmar Medford city manager. “Some of the costs of the added watering system are being covered by donations from local residents,” said Kretchmar.

A pump and valves were also added to help operate the new water system.

Down Town Lamont Receives New Face Lift

Desire from the Lamont board of trustees and mayor to make Lamont a more beautiful place to like live and donations from area residents resulted in down town Lamont receiving a new face lift last week.

One of Lamont’s eyesores was corrected by the filling in of two major holes left when two down town building cleared several years ago.

Jeff Tebow, mayor and Lamont employee Robert Criesforribs are pictured filling sand on the two locations. The sand was a donation from Burl Roberts and Whitehead trucking hauled the sand.

A Medford woman escaped injury Friday afternoon west of Deer Creek when she attempted to pass a tractor at the same time the driver was making a left turn at the first intersection west of the town of Deer Creek.

According to Oklahoma trooper Edsall’s accident report at the accident scene. Nettie Drennan, Medford, driving a 2003 Ford Taurus and a 1995 John Deer tractor being driven by Loren Kuehny, address Rural Medford was both eastbound on SH 11 when the Drennan attempted to pass the tractor at an intersection at the same time Kuehny was making a left turn to the north. Drennan clipped the implement the tractor was pulling. Kuehny told the trooper as soon as he saw what was happening an aborted the turn.

Drennan was issued a citation for being left of center 100 feet of an intersection. “It is illegal to pass within 100 feet of any intersection,” stated trooper Edsall. “Drivers need to remember this when passing other vehicles.”

At approximately 0920 hours on 08/29/08 on US 81 approximately 3 miles

south of SH 11 the was a train / semi collision. There was a large

explosion at the impact sight. There were 2 fatalities and a third subject

that was mediflighted from the scene. It was believed early that this was

a potential HAZMAT/mat incident, however this has been downgraded to a no

evacuation scene. On scene commander advises that the potential threats

are the #7 rail car that is empty ethanol and an LP tanker from the semi

lying approximately 500 yrs the west of the scene. We have been in

contact with Union Pacific HAZMAT, Sooner Emergency HAZMAT (per Union

Pacific request), Enid FD HAZMAT (enroute), NTSB. More to follow when

available. The power is out in most of Medford including at the Grant Co

Sheriff's Office.

The Union Pacific train was traveling from Wichita, Kan., with a load of flour, wheat, possible metals and some flammable substances, said company spokesman Raquel Espinoza-Williams. She said none of the flammable substances leaked. The two dead were on the train. The driver of the truck was taken by helicopter to St. Francis Hospital in Wichita, Kan., according to The Associated Press, with third-degree burns over 50 percent of his body. Update: The driver of a truck hauling propane gas struck by a train south of Medford Friday morning has died. Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported late Sunday night Dennis Wayne Etherton, of Tahlequah, died Sunday evening at the burn center in St. Francis Hospital, Wichita, Kan. He had been hospitalized in critical condition since the accident with third-degree burns over 50 percent of his body. Etherton is the third fatality from the accident, which also claimed the lives of the two Union Pacific trainmen — conductor Larry B. Williams, of Oklahoma City, and engineer Richard D. Pardarvis, of Anadarko.

The search for a rural Winfield man who dissapeared about a month ago has ended with authorities in Grant County, Okla., finding the body of Jack Lee Howe. Howe, 87, dissapeared on Friday, Aug. 1, after leaving his home to run errends. He was then reported missing by his neighbor Lela Bright. Howe was found around 8 p.m. in a cornfield on Thursday evening by a farmer, about three quarters of a mile west from where authorities found his truck parked just off U.S. Highway 81, near a set of railroad tracks. Cowley County Sheriff's Department Captain Bill Mueller said when authorities were originally searching for Howe, it wouldn't have been easy to find him since the cornfield was on the brink of harvest time, and the leaves on the corn stalks were thick, making it next to impossible to see him by air, or otherwise. "It appears that he walked west and, for whatever reason, walked far out into that cornfield," Mueller said. "Grant County officers said you would have had to have been right on top of him to see him." Muller added that, at this point, the death does not appear to be suspicious, but autopsy results are the only way to be certain.
Trooper Cottrill, Always On Duty A twenty-two year-old Ponca City man was charged in Grant country district court Monday Aug 25 after being observed by an off duty Oklahoma Highway Patrol trooper destroying a Grant County district 2 Road Closed sign. Shawn Kelle Crowell, charged with one misdemeanor count of malicious injury to property under 2,500 According to the affidavit filed by trooper Robert Cottrill, While off-duty he and his neighbor were moving farm equipment for corn harvest west of the town of Salt Fork, when he saw several 4-wheelers traveling east on a dirt road west. The county is in the process of replacing a bridge, according to the affidavit and had road closed signs up. Court document went on to state that Cottrill watch the last yellow 4-wheeler pull up to the road closed sign and push it over and then rode over the down sign breaking 2 of the boards. This crime is punishable by a fine of up to $500 or imprisonment in the county jail for up to one year or both.
Wildlife Department Vehicle auction slated for Sept. 11 Those in the market for a used vehicle may find just what they need at the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s public vehicle auction Thursday, Sept. 11 at the Department’s headquarters located at 1801 N. Lincoln in Oklahoma City. “There’s a number of vehicles up for auction, mostly Chevy ½ ton four-wheel drive trucks,” said Johnny Hill, property manager for the Wildlife Department. “Potential bidders can see information on the trucks on wildlifedepartment.com, including estimated mileage and other details.” The auction vehicles may fit the needs of sportsmen who need a new hunting or fishing truck, someone looking to replace their daily driver or even a parent searching for just the right first vehicle for their teenage drivers. “Since there’s a designated time period before the auction where buyers can come inspect the vehicles, bidders can get a better idea of what the trucks have to offer,” Hill said. A total of 30 vehicles will be available, and items may be inspected Sept. 11 from 10 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. Vehicles will be sold individually and “as is.” For a complete list of auction vehicles, log on to wildlifedepartment.com, or for more information call (405) 521-4600.
Lamont Board Appoints Three

Several important agenda items were discussed during the Lamont Special town board meeting held Monday evening.

A new trustee Mark Sproull, a long time resident of Lamont and a DCLA graduate was appointed to the board of trustees.

Jeff Teborw accepted the Mayor position. After the resignation of Ann Rohrs.

A new water/maintenance supervisor Robert Criesforbibs was hired and will start his new position Wednesday Aug. 27th.

Other items on the agenda, the trustees voted to fix the warning sirens for storm and water outages.

All town residents in code violation will start to receive citations and those who have already received abatement letters and citation and not complied will be taken one step further and will be turned over to Judge Long for further consequences according to Oklahoma law. The next court date for Judge Long is Sept 2nd.

Pictured from right to left Robert Criesforribs, Mark Sproull and Jeff Tebow

The Oklahoma Highway Patrol (OHP) encourages motorists and those in recreation areas to be safe and responsible during the upcoming Labor Day holiday. Last year, four individuals lost their lives over the holiday period, which runs from 12:01 a.m. Friday, August 29, through midnight Monday, September 1. To promote safety during this time, the OHP will be participating in Operation C.A.R.E. (Combined Accident Reduction Effort). An increased presence of troopers will be patrolling Oklahoma’s highways and waterways. On the roadways, there will be an enforcement emphasis towards drinking and drugged drivers, speeders, and passenger restraint compliance. At the recreational and lake areas, troopers will concentrate on alcohol violations, reckless activity on the lakes, and the wearing of life jackets for children 12 years of age or under while in a boat. “It takes everyone to do their part in making the holiday safe,” said Major Gerald Davidson of the Oklahoma Highway Patrol. “We want the last holiday of the summer to be a safe and enjoyable one. Too often, someone’s life ends in a needless traffic collision or incident because of poor judgement or irresponsibility.” Everyone can make a difference. Allow plenty of time, for roadways may be more congested than usual. If celebrations include alcohol, do not drink while driving or boating. Wear safety belts and properly use restraint systems for children. On the lakes, ensure the boat is ready with an adequate number of personal flotation devices, fire extinguisher, navigation lights for after sunset, and kids always wear a life jacket on while in a boat. And, don’t forget safety in the general swimming areas on the lakes and pools. “Safety is everyone’s responsibility and it will take everyone to make this holiday a safe one,” said Davidson.
Grant County Free Fair September 4 through 6 The 76th annual Grant County Free Fair will be held September 4 through 6 at the fairgrounds in Pond Creek, Oklahoma. Please check the fair book carefully for convenient early bird self-entry time, new special contests, and new displays! The 2008 Grant County fair books are available at the Grant County OSU Cooperative Extension Office, 112 E. Guthrie Room 301 Courthouse Medford, Oklahoma or on the web at: oces.okstate.edu/grant. There are business & 4-H display opportunities, additional evening & weekend hours for entering and viewing exhibits, new sponsored contests with great prizes, and an exhibit release time of 2:00pm September 6 in order for fair goers to participate in the Pond Creek parade and barbeque before viewing or picking up entries on Saturday.
A quite drive through Medford’s Rosemound Cemetery a few days ago brought tears to my eyes in the condition the cemetery has wasted away to. Sunken graves, tall grass covering names on the tombstones., patches of tall and short grass ,do to hit and miss mowing.

It is time for relatives of family members buried in this cemetery to contact members on the cemetery board. Even see if a workday cannot be organized to do moving and weed eating, if no other action can be taken.

Under "B" 6

The Lamont Senior Center was busing with “BINGO’S during the Saturday night monthly fundraiser to help defray cost of the Centers utility bills. The Lamont Lion’s Club sponsored this month’s session. Some of the top prizes won was a Pumpkin and Pecan pie and a large Pizza from Simple Simooms

Rub-A-Dub-Dub

Medford Cheerleaders’ were keep busy Saturday morning during a car wash and bake sale. The fundraiser held in the parking lot of Karl’s Apple Market.

Parents Curtis and Sharon Perkins and school sponsor Patty Junghanns assisted the cheerleaders with the car wash.

Dove season to kick off fall hunting Largely viewed as the kick-off to fall hunting in Oklahoma, dove season’s Sept. 1 opening day is sure to attract sportsmen to the field, no matter where in Oklahoma they live. Last year’s dove season took on some unusual qualities. Not only did the 2007 dove season come after an unusually rainy year that created muddy conditions and forced many farmers to harvest their grain fields later than normal, but some hunters also took part in a new season format with the formation of the southwest zone, which offered additional hunting opportunities during late December and early January. Biologists say the circumstances of last year’s dove season did not appear to affect the success of hunters, however. “Last year, the rainy conditions may have had some affect on certain areas where hunters were used to finding higher concentrations of birds most years, so some hunters may have had to look at different areas to hunt,” said Rod Smith, southwest region wildlife supervisor for the Wildlife Department. “But dove hunters are persistent, and they were able to locate some good areas and found plenty of birds. This year, though, the management of crops is pretty much back to normal, and we should have a good year.” The southwest zone will be open again this year as well. The season for the southwest zone is the same as the statewide season — Sept.1 - Oct.30 — but also Dec. 27 – Jan. 5. The southwest zone starts on U.S. 62 from the Texas border west of Hollis, east to Interstate 44, Interstate 44 south to OK 7, OK 7 east to U.S. 81 and U.S. 81 south to the Texas border at the Red River . Regulations for the rest of the state have not changed. Dove hunting is wildly popular in Oklahoma . In fact, with the exception of the opening day of the deer rifle season, there are more Oklahomans in the field on the opening day of dove season each year than at any other time. Dove hunting is a favorite for several reasons. For starters, there is plenty of action. Youngsters and adults alike can have an enjoyable yet challenging hunt in Oklahoma no matter where they choose to hunt. Dove can be found from one corner of the state to the next, but hunters do not have to travel far to find them. Excellent hunting can be found on wildlife management areas managed by the Wildlife Department, some of which have been managed specifically for doves. Additionally, persistent dove hunters can often obtain permission from landowners to hunt private land, such as those where grain fields have been recently harvested. Dove season is even more appealing to new hunters because it offers two days of free hunting. September 6-7 marks Oklahoma ’s Free Hunting Days, and Oklahoma residents do not need a hunting license, fishing and hunting legacy permit or HIP permit to go afield. Dove hunters also enjoy a generous daily limits of 15 doves, except in the southwest zone, where the daily limit is 12 doves. The limit may consist of any combination of mourning doves, white-winged doves and Eurasian collared doves. To hunt doves, sportsmen need a hunting license and a fishing and hunting legacy permit, unless exempt. Additionally, all hunters, unless otherwise exempt, must carry a Harvest Information Permit (HIP) while afield. For complete hunting license information and dove hunting regulations, be sure to pick up a copy of the “2008-09 Oklahoma Hunting Guide” at a sporting goods retailer or at wildlifedepartment.com.
Right On track

Phase one of the new running track for the Medford school system was finished Friday afternoon by Evans and Associates according to school officials.

The new asphalt base now has to cure for about 10 days and then the POLYRESIN TRACK top layer will be added, by Merritt Tennis Court & Track Systems a leading tennis court and track Construction Company from Oklahoma City.

School officials are asking everyone to please obey the signs posted and not use the track until it is completely finished.

Marty Tipton, aka The Oklahoma Kid, rode into Lamont Saturday morning for a Picnic in the Park. The spicial event was a get acquainted with Roland Hula who is seeking re-election for the office of Grant County sheriff. The days activities and lunch was sponsored by the Lamont Crime Watchers, with Edna Covalt as director.

Tipton showed off some of his trick roping skills, and

even got the kids involved with some tricks of their own – all with

the intention of “roping” them into learning a little more about

their state’s history.

After that, Tipton gave the audience a brief look into the history of the wild

west, and more specifically Oklahoma itself. He showed several pictures of famous wild west personalities, and explained how

they were all connected to Oklahoma and the 101 Ranch, in Ponca City.

Tipton is a fourth-generation wild west show performer, and his

family ties to this livelihood stretch back more than 120 years.

“My grandfather was a performer and producer with the original Pawnee

Bill Wild West Show, and the Two Bill’s Wild West Show featuring

Pawnee Bill and Buffalo Bill,” Tipton said.

Tipton’s grandfather also worked with several other notorious western

personalities, such as Buffalo Bill Cody, Annie Oakley, Bill Pickett,

Tom Mix and even Geronimo.

If that isn’t enough of a family legacy, Tipton is also a relative of

Oklahoma icon Will Rogers, who was a trick roper himself, so it’s

easy to see how he got into this line of work.

“I’ve been performing shows since I was nine years old,” said Tipton.

“My family has been doing this for 120 years,” said Tipton. “When

someone wants a trick roper, they know where to go.”

Edna Covalt, Sheriff Roland Hula and Scott Sterling are pictured Saturday morning in Lamont during a campaign get-to-gether to re-elect Hula for Sheriff.
A one-vehicle accident Wednesday evening, one-half mile east of Pond Creek, sent a 31-year-old Hennessey, Oklahoma man to an Enid hospital.

According to the accident report by Trooper John Marion, Joseph Cyril III was traveling westbound on US 60 around 7:35 p.m. Wednesday evening and for unknown reason Cyril who was driving a 2006 International truck veered off the roadway. Cyril then according to the report overcorrected sending the vehicle into a broad slide, causing the International to roll one-quarter time coming to rest in the north ditch.

Cyril was transported to St. Mary’s hospital by Pond Creek Fire/EMS and admitted in stable condition, according to the report.

The condition of the driver was listed as apparently normal and the cause of the collision was listed as exceeding legal limit.

Pond Creek Fire/EMS, Pond Creek police department and the Grant County sheriff’s department assisted with the accident.

State Senator Debbe Leftwich said a new law to help curtail attacks on women marks a significant change in how Oklahoma deals with domestic violence. Leftwich was present when Gov. Brad Henry conducted a ceremonial bill signing of SB 2163 at the State Capitol on Wednesday. Leftwich said the statute will take advantage of Global Positioning System Technology (GPS) to better protect domestic abuse victims.

"According to the Oklahoma Domestic Violence Fatality Review Board, our state is tenth in the nation for women murdered by men. Most of those women were in the process of trying to leave their abusers when they were killed, and many had obtained Orders of Protection," said Leftwich, D-Oklahoma City. "Too often, that piece of paper does nothing to deter abusers from attacking again."

In 20 percent of domestic homicides reviewed, Orders of Protection had been utilized. In 67 percent of the cases where a protective order was active at the time of the homicide, the defendant had violated the order prior to the homicide.

"We need to be able to create a zone of safety for these women. With GPS tracking, we can do that," Leftwich said.

The devices, which will be court-issued, will automatically notify both the victim and law enforcement officials if the perpetrator violates the geographic boundaries set by the court.

"Basically, this helps create an electronic zone of safety and a way to prevent another attack should the abuser violate those boundaries," Leftwich said. "By using GPS, we are taking a proactive approach toward domestic abuse, and hopefully we'll be able to save lives."

Kristi Clinage was appointed as new Medford council member and took the oath of office during the regular council meeting Monday evening. Clinage will hold the office until February 0f 2009 when the term for ward 4’s will expire. The city council members is now looking for another board member with the termination of Brian Burright, council member at-large, for missing three connective meeting.

Kristi Clinage is pictued on the left Barbara Bush Medford city clerk is shown on the right.

Corporation Commissioner Jim Roth encouraged the public to research state gas stations before they go to the pump. “For the most part our state gas stations do a great job of staying in compliance with Corporation Commission Rules,” Roth said. “But when they do have violations, it is our job to inform the public.” Roth announced that the public can go to the Corporation Commission Web site and click the “Gas Station Violations” link located under his name. “Now citizens can help themselves be better informed about habitual offenders,” Roth explained.

Roth noted that more than 5,000 stations have been cited since July of last year for various violations. The Commission has been forced to lock down over 300 violators during that same time frame. The Web site notates the nature of the violation according to Roth. “Not all violations are the same, that is why citizens should do research before purchasing fuel,” he said.

State law places the responsibility of regulating gas pumps in the hands of the Corporation Commission Fuel Inspectors. Calibration tests are preformed on all of the state's gas pumps. A pump must be within minus six cubic inches, or about six tablespoons, of a five-gallon measure in the calibration test. Operators failing the test are given twenty-four hours to comply before the pump is locked down. Pumps exceeding nineteen cubic inches are locked down immediately. Fuel inspectors also check octane rating, for water in the gas, ethanol content, and compliance with safety and environmental rules.

“It is my responsibility as a Commissioner to educate and protect the public,” Roth explained. “Providing this information will empower citizens to make informed decision about fuel purchases at a time when it is most critical to do so,” he concluded.

Monthly fatalities for the month of July

Department of Public Safety officials report a increase

in traffic fatalities for the month of July, 2008. Fatalities

for July were up three for a total of 61, compared to 58 in

the same month last year.

Three were pedestrians,10 were motorcyclists and 4 were

ATV drivers. The highest daily numbers include 13 deaths each

on Sundays and Thursdays and 9 each on Fridays and Saturdays.

There were six deathless days in the month of July.

Fifteen of the vehicle crashes were alcohol-related, in the opinion

of the investigating state, county or municipal officer. There

were 46 male and 15 female victims. Fifty-three of the victims

were Oklahoma residents and eight were non-residents.

Nineteen of the fatality victims were 20 or under. The leading

number of fatalities by age group were 19 in the 21-to 30 year-olds,

dropping to 16 in the 17- to 20 year-olds categories. Oklahoma County

led the state in fatalities with a fatality count of six, dropping to five

fatalities

each was Caddo and Custer Counties.

Sixty-three percent of those who died in traffic collisions were not

wearing safety belts at the time of the crash, according to DPS statistics.

Unsafe speed continues to be the leading cause of death.

There were 54 fatality crashes in the month of July, 20 of them were

recorded on County Roads, and there were 12 each on US and State

Highways.

The year to date fatalities through August 10, 2008 - - - 402

The year to date fatalities through August 10, 2007 - - - 440

Adina Wiebe and Nelda Fowler are pictured attending the Medford Busy Moms Baked potato dinner Friday evening. The dinner was a fundraiser to help defray cost for the clubs annual senior citizens’ Christmas party and turkey dinner. The Busy Moms has always been a big supporter of the Medford community by donating back to the community and school.

Evers Pleads Guilty to Taking Funds from Edmond Nursing Home Residents

A former administrator at an Edmond nursing home pleaded guilty yesterday to taking more than $3,000 from residents in her care, Attorney General Drew Edmondson said.

Susan Gail Evers, 55, was charged in June with one count of caretaker exploitation for illegally taking money from the trust fund accounts of residents at Edmond’s Grace Living Center. She was sentenced Thursday in Oklahoma County District Court to a two-year deferred sentence and ordered to pay a $500 fine, $100 victim compensation assessment and court costs.

Evers admitted to investigators that she took the money from resident’s trust fund accounts and gambled the funds. She has already paid full restitution of $3,090.65.

Edmondson’s Patient Abuse and Medicaid Fraud Control Unit has statewide jurisdiction to investigate and prosecute provider fraud and patient abuse and neglect in any Medicaid provider facility. Anyone with information regarding provider fraud or patient abuse can contact the Attorney General’s Office at (405) 521-4274.

It has been a long time coming, but area residents and travelers in the Deer Creek area will be able to enjoy the connivance of card reader pumps. “We hope to have the pumps completed by the end of Aug. Said Kent Prickett, Farmers Grain Manager. “The pumps will be just like the ones already being used at our other stations,” said prickett. “We are really excited about the improvements to the Deer Creek service area.” The old pumps could only be used by a key issued holder of Farmers Grain.
The search for missing person Jack Lee Howe continues, despite the lack of leads and no physical signs of Howe's disappearance.

According to Cowley Sheriff's Department Capt. Bill Mueller, police have not found any indication as to why Howe went missing. Howe, 87, was last seen by neighbor Lela Bright on Friday, Aug. 1.

Though police have responded to several possible sightings of Howe, "None of them have panned out," said Mueller.

Howe's abandoned blue 1999 Ford Ranger was discovered in Grant County, Okla., on Sunday morning by the Grant County Sheriff's Office.

Despite an extensive search of the area, Howe was not found, nor was any evidence as to why he disappeared.

FISHING REPORT FOR AUGUST 6, 2008

CENTRAL

Arcadia: Channel catfish good. Blue catfish good on waterdogs. Report submitted by Blake Pearson, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Draper: Elevation normal and clear. White bass good trolling, watch for surfacing activity on jigs, in-line spinners and medium-diving crankbaits. Channel catfish fair on cut bait at the east side fishing docks. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

Hefner: Striped bass hybrids fair on cut shad. Walleye fair. Report submitted by Blake Pearson, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Overholser: Channel catfish slow on shrimp. Report submitted by Blake Pearson, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Thunderbird: Elevation normal and clear. White bass good on points and humps trolling with inline spinners, medium-diving crankbaits and sassy shad, also look for surfacing activity early mornings. Saugeye good on sassy shad, jigs and medium-diving crankbaits at 7-10 ft. off points, usually move into shallower water late evening to feed. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

NOTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation normal, water 85 and clear. Largemouth bass fair early and late. Channel catfish fair on shad and worms. Report submitted by Mike France, game warden stationed in Pottawatomie County .

Birch: Elevation normal, water 87 and clear. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around brush piles and docks at 15 ft. Blue and channel catfish fair on cut shad, crayfish, and worms fishing near rocks at 10-15 ft. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and plastic worms in vegetation. Striped bass hybrids good on crankbaits trolling humps at 12-20 ft. and surfacing at dawn and dusk. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 85 and murky. Striped bass fair on live bait. Crappie good on jigs at 14-16 ft. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Copan: Elevation 3 ft. above normal and stained. Crappie good on minnows and pink jigs near submerged structure at 8-10 ft. Channel catfish fair on rod and reel and juglines with shad, stinkbait and worms. Flathead and channel catfish slow on fresh cut, live shad, worms and chicken livers below the dam. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Eucha: Elevation slightly above normal, water 89 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows at 10-12 ft. around brush and structure. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits at night. Bluegill continue to be active on crickets and worms around grass beds. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Grand: Elevation 1 ft. below normal. Water above Sailboat Bridge lightly stained, Sailboat Bridge to Horse Creek slightly colored to clear and Horse Creek to the dam clear. Bass are moving out on the deeper structure and brush piles being caught on Carolina-rig and football jig; in the main lake and off secondary points bass being caught on fat free shad, DD22 crankbaits, topwater lures, buzz baits, spooks and frogs. Crappie slow. Catfish being caught drift fishing around Bad Island and in the Horse Creek area, juglines with sunfish, shad and goldfish at 20-25 ft. White bass good, they are starting to surface and stay up for more than 30 seconds; they are surfacing good in Elk River, Horse Creek, Patrica Island, and Drowning Creek. Report submitted by Littlefield’s Sporting Goods and Greg Lamb’s Guide Service.

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on topwater lures, spinnerbaits and plastic baits in the morning. Catfish good on cut baits and stinkbaits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at fishing docks. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hudson: Elevation normal. Largemouth bass good on plastic baits. White bass fair to good on small lures. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Rogers and Mayes Counties .

Hulah: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. above normal and stained. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 7-10 ft. Channel catfish fair on cut shad. Blue and channel catfish slow below the dam on live or fresh cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 2 ft. below normal, water 86 and murky. White bass good trolling crankbaits from Pioneer Marine to Kaw City Bridge . Blue catfish good on cut shad and blood bait with rod and reel, juglines and trotlines in the Coon Creek area. Crappie fair on jigs at 12-15 ft. in Washunga Bay Bridge area. Boaters need to be aware of tree stumps and sand bars due to lower lake levels. Bear Creek boat ramp is inaccessible. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Keystone: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits, crankbaits and plastic worms on bottom in shaded coves. White bass good on spinnerbaits, tube jigs and minnows at 4-6 ft. in bridge riprap and below the dam. Striped bass good on bucktail jigs and topwater lures at 1-4 ft. below the dam and at bridges. Channel catfish fair on stinkbaits and cut shad at 4-6 ft. below the dam and muddy flats. Blue catfish fair on whole shad and large minnows at 3-7 ft. below the dam and grassy areas. Flathead catfish good on live shad and goldfish at 4-8 ft. below the dam and in large rock areas. Crappie fair on minnows and tube jigs at 5-10 ft. at bridges and brush piles. Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Oologah: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water mid-80's and murky. Blue catfish fair on juglines with shad on the flats at 15-20 ft. Crappie fair around brush piles using minnows and jigs at 10-15 ft. White bass fair trolling shad colored crankbaits at 10-15 ft. in the main lake early and late. Blue catfish are good below the dam on shad. White bass and crappie are fair below the dam on jigs. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water upper 80’s and clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and soft plastics in deep water. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on the surface early and late. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-20 ft. in brush. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Spavinaw: Elevation slightly above normal, water 90 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around the dam. Largemouth bass fair on topwater baits early morning and late evening. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Webbers Falls: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits in riprap and creek channels. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits, cut baits and sunfish on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around ridges and structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. White bass and striped bass hybrids good drifting shad. Walleye fair trolling crankbaits and drifting night crawlers. Channel catfish good on grasshoppers and water dogs. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

SOUTHEAST

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 85. Smallmouth bass and spotted bass good on light jigs and small shallow diving crankbaits. Channel catfish excellent on cut shad and chicken livers. Sunfish good on red worms and grasshoppers. Report submitted by Matt Gamble, biologists at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Eufaula: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits at deep points. White bass fair on jigs under bridges. Blue catfish fair on fresh shad drifting the deep flats. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs under bridges. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation 1 ft. below normal and water 87. Crappie fair on minnows along the river channel. Catfish fair on trotlines baited with sunfish. Blue catfish good in the tailwater on shad. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan Counties .

Konawa: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water 95 and clear. Largemouth bass good on topwater lures at 5-10 ft. with schooling bass in coves early and late. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

McGee Creek: Elevation 3/4 ft. above normal, water 86 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on plastic craws and crawfish colored crankbaits at 6-18 ft. along rocky points and on topwater lures early and late. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Water 85 and clear. Largemouth bass being caught on worms and soft plastic jerk baits at daylight and late at night. White bass good schooling early and late on topwater and trolling. Crappie slow at 10-15 ft. around brush piles early and late. Walleye slow at the dam at night. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation normal and clear. Bass fair on soft plastics off of points. Catfish fair on liver. Crappie good on minnows at the old bridge at night. Report Submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water 84 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits at 6-8 ft. on the riprap and rocks and on plastic baits in the weeds next to deeper water. Crappie fair on minnows at 8 ft. in the bends in the old creek channels. White bass fair at 8 ft. trolling crankbaits in the Sallisaw Creek and Evergreen areas. Blue and flathead catfish fair on fresh cut bait and live bait at 15-20 ft. in the upper end of the lake from Webbers Falls to the Tamaha area. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Bass good to fair on plastics around points and creek channels and on spinnerbaits around cover. Crappie good on minnows off of Jack Fork Bridge and off of tower. Flathead catfish slow on juglines and trotlines with live bait. Blue and channel catfish good on jugs and trotlines with cut bait or shrimp. White bass good trolling around islands and on plugs and when found surfacing. Walleye slow to fair trolling around islands. Report submitted by Alan Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation 2 ft. below normal, water 86 and clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on surface baits, plastic baits and live bait around underwater stumps and brush. Striped and white bass good on live bait, slabs and surface baits from catfish bay south. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on stinkbait, worms and live bait from platter flats north. Crappie slow on minnows around the fish attractors. Sunfish good on worms around the fish attractors. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. below normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair on topwater lures, buzzbaits, early and late. Crappie slow on small spinners and jigs. Channel catfish fair to slow on cut shad and liver with jugs. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 12 ft. below normal and dropping. Bank fishing is slow. Walleye fair to good on minnows in deeper water. Striped bass hybrids and white bass fair to good on minnows in deeper water. Crappie fair. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

A new license plate for the state of Oklahoma has been selected!

On the Oklahoma Tax Commission's Web site ( www.tax.ok.gov ) the new plate design is displayed and will replace all Oklahoma regulation license plates beginning January 2, 2009. The new plate features the Sacred Rain Arrow sculpture by Oklahoma artist Allan Houser (1914-1994).

Note: Special license plates that have designs unique to that plate type will not be affected by this redesign.

For Oklahoma motorists who want to retain their existing plate number, the 2008 License Plate Number Retention Program has been established. If your vehicle is currently registered in the State of Oklahoma, you have the option to retain your current plate number on the new plate being released in 2009.

Oklahomans who do not participate in the Plate Retention Program will receive the new plate at the time of initial registration or renewal of a current plate in calendar year 2009 at no additional cost.

The License Plate Retention Program is a limited time offer. You only have until November 1, 2008 to request your plate number retention. Once your retention request has been received along with payment, your new plate will be manufactured and mailed to you after January 1, 2009.

The cost of duplicating your existing plate number in the new plate design is $17.00. This includes the $15.00 retention fee plus a $2.00 mailing fee. These fees are in addition to any registration fees due at the time of the vehicle renewal.

The new plate may be displayed only on the vehicle that currently displays the license plate number being requested. It is intended as a replacement for that former plate and only for that vehicle. For the new plate to be mailed out in January, the vehicle must be currently registered. This means the vehicle must already have been registered for 2009 and display the 2009 registration decal.

Retention Program Options

If you are interested in retaining your current plate number, you have two options:

* File for Plate Retention online and pay by electronic check.

* Download the Form 710-Z: License Plate Retention Request Form, pay by check, money order or credit card and mail to address shown on form.

Please Note: The complete retention request (using one of the methods above) must be completed and paid ($17.00) by November 1, 2008. Requests received after such date or lacking required information/payment will not be honored.

After Jack Lee Howe hadn't returned home by Sunday afternoon, neighbor Lela Bright decided that the situation had become too suspicious to ignore any longer.

According to Cowley County Sheriff's Department Capt. Bill Mueller, Bright told police she became concerned when Howe hadn't returned home after leaving Friday afternoon to get a metal bucket for his dogs.

Howe, 87, whose residence is at 20783 81st Road, is described as a white male, 5 feet, 8 inches, 100 pounds, gray hair, brown eyes and glasses. He was last seen wearing a light blue pair of denim jeans and a long-sleeved red shirt with lightly colored suspenders.

"We got the report (Sunday) around noon that he hadn't been seen since Friday," Mueller said Monday afternoon.

Mueller said the situation got even more complicated later that afternoon when Cowley County sheriff's personnel received reports that the Grant County, Okla., Sheriff's Office had found Howe's abandoned blue 1999 Ford Ranger with a white bed topper just off U.S. 81 early Sunday morning.

Mueller said that Grant County police found the truck less than a mile south of the Oklahoma/Kansas border, alongside railroad tracks and right out of sight of vehicles passing on the highway. The spot where the truck was found is between 45 and 50 miles from Howe's home.

According to Mueller, a preliminary search of the area where the truck was found yielded no results.

Early Monday morning, Grant County officers, along with interstate aid from the Sumner County Sheriff's Department and a Kansas Highway Patrol helicopter unit, conducted an extensive search of the area but again came up with no results as to Howe's whereabouts.

When Cowley County Sheriff's Department personnel received the report, they immediately contacted Howe's next of kin to see if they had heard anything from him.

Heat advisory remains in effect until 7 PM CDT this evening...

A heat advisory remains in effect until 7 PM CDT Tuesday evening.

A heat advisory means that a period of very hot weather will

occur. Hot temperatures and humidity will combine to create a

situation in which heat related illnesses are possible. Drink

plenty of fluids... stay in an air-conditioned room... stay out of

the sun... and check on relatives and neighbors. You should also

make sure outdoor pets have plenty of fresh water and a source of

shade.

Patrick Wilson and Tyler Flaherty are both serving in the Iraq war. If you would like to send them an item in our care package please drop it off to City Hall by Friday, August 8th. No pork is allowed and they say they have way too much hand sanitizer already. You can send magazines, movies, puzzle books, reading books, food, snacks, newspapers, t-shirts, just about anything really. Help show our support of the Medford Troops and contribute to the packages to be sent.

Thanks,

Medford resident, Frankie Robbins, is running for the U.S. House of Representatives. His campaign is hosting a dinner Thursday, Aug. 7th, 6:30 p.m. @ Medford Civic Center. Come hear from Frankie why he merits your support and your vote.
FISHING REPORT FOR JULY 30, 2008

CENTRAL

Draper: Elevation normal and clear. White bass good trolling watch for surfacing activity on jigs, inline spinners and medium-diving crankbaits. Channel catfish fair on cut bait east side fishing docks. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

Overholser: Striped bass hybrids good on live baits. Channel catfish good on cut shad. Report submitted by Blake Pearson, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Thunderbird: Elevation normal and clear. White bass good on points and humps trolling with in-line spinners, medium-diving crankbaits and sassy shad; also look for surfacing activity early mornings. Saugeye good on sassy shad, jigs and medium-diving crankbaits at 7-10 ft. off points, usually move into shallower water late evening to feed. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation normal, water 82. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits and topwater lures. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish fair on punchbaits. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation normal, water 83 and murky. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 12-18 ft. Catfish good on live and cut bait. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Copan: Elevation normal, water stained. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 7-10 ft. near submerged structure. Channel catfish fair on rod and reel and juglines with shad, stinkbait and worms. Flathead and channel catfish slow below the dam on fresh cut bait, live shad, worms and chicken livers. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. above normal and steady, water 91 and murky. Largemouth bass good on salt crawls in flooded rocks and timber early and late. White bass good trolling with jigs, rattletraps, bucktail jigs and spinnerbaits. Channel catfish good on cut shad. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 12-15 ft. around structure. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 80-87 and stained above Sailboat Bridge, slightly colored to clear from Sailboat Bridge to Horse Creek and clear from the dam to Horse Creek. The water is continuing to fall and getting hotter. Bass are moving out on the deeper structure and brush piles, Carolina-rig and the football jig is still catching quality and quantity of fish on main lake and secondary points. Fat-free shad and DD22 crankbaits are producing some large fish. Topwater bite is good on buzz baits, spooks and frogs. Crappie slow. Catfish drift fishing is great between Sailboat Bridge and Monkey Island , juglines good on sunfish, shad and goldfish. White bass slow with some action mid-lake jigging spoons at 15-25 ft. Report submitted by Littlefield’s Sporting Goods and Greg Lamb’s Guide Service.

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits and spinnerbaits along shoreline and weed beds. Catfish good on stinkbaits and cut baits on bottom, in creek channels and at the spillway. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at the fishing dock and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hudson: Largemouth bass good on plastic worms and baits. Channel catfish good on cut shad below the dam and the upper end of the lake. Crappie fair to good on minnows and small jigs. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Rogers and Mayes Counties .

Hulah: Elevation slightly below normal, water stained. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 7-10 ft. Channel catfish fair on cut shad. Blue and channel catfish slow on live or fresh cut shad below the dam. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Oologah: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water 80 and murky. Blue catfish fair on juglines baited with shad fishing on flats at 15-20 ft. Crappie fair around brush piles using minnows and jigs at 10-15 ft. White bass and crappie fair below the dam on jigs. Blue catfish fair below the dam on shad. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water upper 80’s and clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and soft plastics in deep water. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on the surface early and late. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-20 ft. in brush. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: Striped bass hybrids good on slabs and live shad at the dam. Catfish fair on cut bait and live bait along points and channels. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in game warden stationed in Noble County .

Tenkiller: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water 86 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on bass jigs at 20 ft. brush or on 25 ft. ledges. Catfish good on stinkbaits at 17-20 ft. with some action on worms, shrimp or cut baits near swimming beaches. Sunfish good along bluffs or in docks on night crawlers. Report by Monte Brooks Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits in creek channels along riprap. Catfish good on stinkbaits, cut baits and sunfish on bottom and mud flats. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at bridges and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORHTWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Channel catfish good on shad and water dogs. White bass, striped bass, striped bass hybrids and walleye fair drifting shad and trolling crankbaits. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

Ft. Supply: Elevation normal, water clear. Channel catfish fair on stinkbaits and chicken liver all over the lake at night. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 84 and stained. Crappie good on curly-tailed jigs at brush piles. White bass slow. Channel catfish fair on dough bait at baited holes. Bass fishing slow with some action early on topwater lures. Sunfish excellent using fly rod and popping bugs. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Broken Bow: Water mid-80’s and clear. Largemouth and spotted bass fair at topwater with schooling fish in the mornings and late evening and after dark on soft plastics around points and structure. Catfish slow on juglines and trotlines. Crappie good on minnows around structure and upper end of lake. Walleye being caught on deep-running crankbaits and jigs after dark around points and rocky bluffs with the full moon. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits off points. White bass fair on jigs off bridges. Blue catfish fair on shad drifting the flats. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs below the bridges. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation normal, water 88. Crappie fair to good along the Kiamichi River channel below Rattan Landing at 12-20 ft. around brush piles. Blue catfish good on shad and worms below the dam. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 91 and clear. Largemouth bass good on topwater lures and crankbaits at 5-10 ft. in schooling bass early and late. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits at 10-12 ft. around points. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

Lower Mountain Fork River: Trout slowing with warm temperatures with some being caught on various soft hackles (pheasant tail), red fox squirrel, caddis fly nymphs, Hex patterns (late in the evening), crackle backs and zebra midge. Report submitted by Beavers Bend Fly Shop.

McGee Creek: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 86 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on plastic craws and crawfish colored crankbaits at 6-18 ft. along rocky points and also on top water lures early and late. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Water 85 and clear. Largemouth bass being caught on worms and soft plastic jerk baits at daylight and late at night. White bass good schooling early and late on topwater and trolling. Crappie slow at 10-15 ft. around brush piles early and late. Walleye slow at the dam at night. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation normal, water murky. Bass are good in the early morning in the upper ends of creeks and up the river channel on topwater lures especially chugbugs and Pop-Rs; during late evening they are fair on Texas-rigged grubs and tubes. Crappie are fair in the early morning on jigs. Catfish good on jugs with stinkbait. Report Submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water 84 and murky. Largemouth bass fair at 6-8 ft. using crankbaits fishing the riprap jetties around the lake. Crappie fair at 8 ft. using minnows fishing the old creek channels in the Sallisaw creek, Big Sans Bois and Dirty Creek areas. White bass fair at 6-8 ft. trolling crankbaits in the lower end of the lake. Blue and flathead catfish good on trotlines and juglines with live bait at 10-20 ft. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Texoma: Elevation 2 ft. below normal, water 84 and clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on plastic baits, some topwater lures and crankbaits from the shoreline to drop-offs. Striped and white bass good on live bait, topwater lures and sassy shad from Catfish Bay south. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on live bait, cut shad and worms from Catfish Bay north. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs in Widow Moore and Kansas Creeks. Sunfish good on worms and shrimp along the shorelines. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 1 ft. below normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair on topwater lures, buzzbaits early and late. Crappie slow with small spinnerbaits and jigs. Channel and blue catfish fair on juglines with cut shad and liver. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 9 ft. below normal and dropping. Fishing is very slow from the banks, best in the deeper waters. Walleye fair on minnows. Striped bass hybrids fair on minnows. Crappie poor. Hicks Mountain and & Main boat ramps are good. Lakeview campground is open and the boat ramp there is barely functional. Irrigation canal is running. No water is going over spillway, use caution when near dam. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Ellsworth: Elevation normal water murky. Crappie good at Ralph's Resort on minnows in shallow water. Catfish slow. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Foss: Elevation normal, water 80 and clear. Gates closed. Fishing has slowed some due to high temperatures. White bass have been seen surfacing in evenings. Striped bass hybrids slow to fair in late evenings drifting with live bait. Catfish fair on trot lines. Walleye fair. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: Elevation just below normal. Catfish slow on punch baits and stinkbaits. Saugeye slow to fair drifting night crawlers. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County .

Lawtonka: Elevation below normal and clear. Catfish fair to good on cut bait. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Tom Steed: Elevation normal, water 80 and clear. Catfish fair on cut bait and shad. Walleye fair on minnows and shad. Striped bass and striped bass hybrids fair on shad and minnows. Report submitted by Robin Pugh, game warden stationed in Tillman County .

Felony charges were filed on Tuesday July 28 in Grant county district court on a Medford man after several sexual explicit text messages were sent to a 14-year Medford girl.

Lance E. Cochran, 34, was charged with one felony count of lewd or indecent proposals or acts to a child under 16.

According to court records filed by ADA Steven Young, Alan Juhl Medford assistant police chief was on patrol at about 9 p.m. on the evening of July 22, 2008. When he was summoned by Grant county deputy Jeremy Brittian to Medford police Chief Roger Christman’s home. When Juhl arrived deputy Brittain told him that earlier that evening a 14-year-old Medford girl had informed him that her friend had been receiving unwanted sexually explicit texts messages from Lance Cochran.

According to the affidavit, Juhl and Brittain went to the girl’s home. The 14-year-old girl stated she had started to receiving texts from Cochran earlier in that morning, with just small talk. And later without any encouragement from her, the texts progressed to explicit sexual suggestions. She stated she had deleted the texts in fear that her dad would take the phone from her. She told Juhl she had forwarded the texts to a friend who had saved them and later forwarded them back to her in the process through the author of the texts were omitted. Juhl asked the girl how she was acquainted with Cochran and she said she had baby-sat for him and his wife.

The affidavit stated Juhl and Brittain then went to speak with Cochran. When they arrived, Cochran was sitting in his pickup in his driveway. Officers asked Cochran if he had been sending text messages a young girl earlier that day. According to the affidavit, Cochran broke down and confessed he had and had been sitting in his truck asking the “Lord for forgiveness.” He insinuated that both of them had said things they should not have, He admitted he was completely out of line when officer Juhl mentioned the girls age.

Cochran appeared in court July 28 and is out on a $2,000 bond.

Remnants of hurricane Dolly hit Medford yesterday evening with .73 inch of rain falling in a very short time. Area kids wasted no time to take advantage of all the flash flooding at the corner of south 4th and Cherokee Street.

Drivers driving through the flooding water gave an extra splash to their fun.

Tuesday’s is always an exciting day in Medford. One reason is, it is a scheduled (and I highlight “SCHEDULE”) trash pickup day. Your trash might be gathered at 7 a.m. or not picked up until 7 p.m. (or not at all.) You might find your empty can in your yard, your neighbors’ yard and I might add I have seen them in near-by bushes. (If you refer back to our picture Library, you can see a picture of that very incident.)

Nevertheless, yesterday was no exception. It seems our trusty worthy sanitation department was involved in a sight accident at the corner of fifth and Guthrie. Sources say it was a hit and run, and leaving the scene of an accident.

local detectives had the case of the leaning streetlight pole solved in just a matter of minutes.

Now, for the important question, will the driver of the trash truck be charged?

Charges were filed and a felony warrant issued July 25 in Grant county district court on Joshua Roy Albright, 23, after a daring escape from the Grant county jail around 5 a. m. the day before.

Albright was charged with two felony counts of unauthorized use of a vehicle and escaping from a penal institution.

In addition, supplemental information for prior offenses was also filed on July 25, of robbery in the first degree and burglary in the first degree. The enhanced punishment stated to be used to enhance the sentencing punishment. The enhanced sentencing punishment is for a term not to exceeding 10 years.

According to the affidavit, Grant county deputy Jeremy Brittain and reserve deputy Dale Chain were assigned to transport Albright to the Oklahoma department of corrections.

According to court records, Albright was brought down from the jail to the book-in area by jailor D’Lisa Phillps. Albright asked if he could use the restroom. Albright was told it was all right. The affidavit stated, Albright then walked to the restroom while in the restroom he exited out the window to the north side of the building. He the entered the 2008 black Ford pick-up. Albright then drove away from the Sheriff’s office.

Albright is incarcerated in Johnson county Arkansas, awaiting extradition. After being captured in Arkansas the next day. Johnson County is about 60 miles east of the Oklahoma state line. He way still was driving the Grant County’s 2008 patrol unit at time of his capture.

Oklahoma Sales Tax Holiday: August 1-3, 2008

Beginning at 12:01 am on Friday, August 1, 2008, and ending at 12:00 midnight on Sunday, August 3, 2008, Oklahoma will have a sales tax holiday which will give shoppers the opportunity to purchase certain clothing and shoes sales tax free. This includes state, county and local municipality sales taxes.

Retailers are required to participate and may not charge tax on items that are legally tax-exempt during the sales tax holiday. The sales tax holiday exempts the sale of clothing and shoes priced at less than $100 from sales taxes.

A special celebration was held Friday afternoon on the lawn of the Medford Family Clinic to celebrate Integris Bass Baptist serving Medford, Wakita and Caldwell communities since 1993.

Dr. Jim Blunk, Dr. Edward Barns and nurse Practitioners Rita White and Katie Katie Mayne were on hand to help celebrate this special occasion.

Dr. Jim Blunk is pictured visiting with Adeline Boyer under a shade tree, the temperature was nearing 100 degrees Friday afternoon.

Grant County Teen Escapes Injury

A one-vehicle accident without injury occurred Thursday evening July 24th, one mile west of Medford when a Grant county teen, Shelby Blubaugh, 16, was east bound on SH 11.

According to a report from OHP trooper Robert Cottrill at the accident scene,

Miss Blubaugh was distracted from her driving, by something inside her 1993 Nissan at which time the vehicle left the roadway to the south striking on OG&E utility pole.

Ron Miller OG&E representative was call to the accident scene to repair damage electrical lines.

Miss Blubaugh received a citation for inattention to the roadway

Hunting Season Approaches

With dove season only about a month away and Oklahoma’s deer seasons not far behind, Oklahoma hunters should begin marking their calendars and scheduling their fall hunts now. Season dates and information for planning fall hunts can be found in the new “2008-09 Oklahoma Hunting Guide,” available now at license dealers across the state.

“Dove season opens Sept. 1, kicking off the fall hunting season in Oklahoma, and then you’ve got to plan for the deer archery season opener on Oct. 1,” said Larry Manering, law enforcement chief for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. “And you don’t want to forget the deer muzzleloader season opener Oct. 25, the deer gun season opener Nov. 22 or the quail opener Nov. 8. There are several additional season dates to remember such as youth deer season, doe days, holiday antlerless season, dates on wildlife management areas that may differ from statewide season dates and also turkey and small game seasons. With all that going on, it’s important to get your hunts planned now so you don’t miss your favorite season, and the best way to get it planned out and marked on your calendar is to have the new ‘Oklahoma Hunting Guide’ on hand while you do it. It’s a great publication with all the dates and regulation information you need for a successful season, no matter what game you hunt.”

There have been several changes to the hunting regulations designed to increase hunter opportunity and help better manage the state’s rich and diverse natural resources. Regulation changes are documented in the new “Oklahoma Hunting Guide,” and the following are a few of the highlights:

* The deer archery season limit has been increased to six deer, which may include no more than two antlered deer.

* The Jan. 1-15 portion of the deer archery season is no longer antlerless only.

* Elk hunting opportunities have expanded.

* Apprentice licenses may now be purchased by residents 10 years old and older.

For complete information about license costs, season dates, zones and other details about the upcoming hunting seasons, pick up a copy of the new “2008-09 Oklahoma Hunting Guide,” available at hunting license vendors across the state, or log on to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com.

New Offices On the Horizon

Medford city employees are seen preparing for a new water meter for the future home of the US Soil Conservation Services and Farm Service Agency.

The two agencies have been relocated temporarily until a permanent home could be built, after elevated levels of radon gas and mold, were found at 121 Kretchmar and 619 North Front, a location both businesses held for a many years.

The two agencies were first housed the Medford community room and later modular buildings for temporary offices from the U.S. Corps of Engineers arrived at 409 S. Front. The temporary offices were placed on empty lots adjacent to the Grant County Conservation District.

Air samples from the building were taken in early June of 2006. After several employees became unconformable because of the high number of co-workers that had developed cancer. Results showed the radon level exceeded EPA standards of air quality, necessitating relocation of the offices.

Radon in the air is ubiquitous, meaning it can be found in the air inside and outside of buildings of all kinds. It is odorless and tasteless. The invisible gas, produced by the decay of naturally occurring uranium in soil and water, is a proven carcinogen. Exposure to radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer after smoking, according to Environ-mental Protection Agency. EPA estimates approximately 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year in the U.S. are radon-related.

Radon typically moves up through the ground to the air above and into homes or other buildings through cracks and holes in the foundation, according to EPA.

There are several proven methods to reduce radon in buildings, according to EPA, but the one primarily used is a vent pipe system and fan, which pulls radon from beneath the house and vents it to the outside.

The new building is located just north of the Grant county District 2, on US 81.

Joshua R. Albright, 23, was reportedly captured in Arkansas Thursday morning and is in custody in Johnson County, Ark., about 60 miles east of the Oklahoma state line. He was captured around 2 a.m., authorities say, and was still driving the Grant County's 2008 Sheriff's patrol unit.

Former Bartlesville Nursing Home Worker Charged

A former admissions coordinator for a Bartlesville nursing home was arrested today after being charged with eight felony counts of financial exploitation by caretaker, Attorney General Drew Edmondson said.

Bobbie Jo Wilhelm, 53, was charged in Washington County District Court today after an investigation by Edmondson’s Patient Abuse and Medicaid Fraud Control Unit found she had cashed more than $7,600 in royalty checks that should have been deposited into a Bartlesville Care Center resident’s trust account.

“Upon questioning, Bobbie Wilhelm admitted to forging the resident’s signature on eight checks totaling $7,617.18 and using the money to pay her own bills,” Edmondson said. “We allege these incidents took place between July 2005 and March 2006.”

If convicted, Wilhelm faces up to ten years imprisonment and up to a $10,000 fine per count. She was arrested by officers from the Bartlesville Police Department. Her bond has been set at $25,000.

Edmondson’s Patient Abuse and Medicaid Fraud Control Unit has statewide jurisdiction to investigate and prosecute provider fraud and patient abuse and neglect in any Medicaid provider facility. Anyone with information regarding provider fraud or patient abuse can contact the Attorney General’s Office at (405) 521-4274.

An early morning escape, from the Grant County jail Thursday July 24th resulted in a theft of the department’s 2008 black crew-extended cab Ford 4x4 pickup.

Anyone seeing the black extended cab with the Logo Grant County Sheriff Department written on the side is to contact the Grant County sheriff’s department at once, or any law enforcement agency.

Joshua R. Albright, 23, was being transferred to Lexington early this morning when he escaped out a lower floor restroom window and gain access to the waiting deputy Sheriff's vehicle that was to transport him to Lexington.

After leaving with the Sheriff's unit he was heard making comments back to the Grant County sheriff office on their county radio frequency.

Frankie Robbins Announces Candidacy for the US House of Representatives

I am running for the U.S. House of Representatives in the 3rd Congressional District of Oklahoma. I do so with humility and sincerity.

I am proud to be kicking off my campaign in my hometown of Medford. In front of neighbors, high school classmates, and friends who know me best. Know from whence I came and many who have shaped and influenced my life.

There are many people who have shaped my life – none greater than my parents with the unconditional love of my mother; and my dad’s determination to never give up, to never quit despite having to use crutches to get around due to the ravages of arthritis. To this day, his personal fortitude is my role model for perseverance and hard work.

I am proud of my heritage – my Grandfather – Charlie S. Robbins – who made the land run in 1893 and whose name is inscribed in the memorial to the homesteaders and early settlers – the memorial just east of us.

I am thankful for the American Legion sponsoring Boy’s State. I have had a passion for public service ever since I attended Oklahoma Boys State in 1963 as well as the inspiration of President John F. Kennedy.

I am thankful to Don Schuneman, my high school principle, for a lesson in leadership.

The day after I was elected Student Council President at the end of my junior year; I had watched as two of my classmates had de-pants an 8th grader. Before applying one swat with the paddle, Mr. Schuneman told me a true leader would speak up and stop a wrong. The lesson I took from that was: leaders should be held accountable; leaders should take action “to do the right thing”; and the biggest impression that paddle made – humility, a big dose of humble pie!

I am standing here today because of Roland Hula, my high school classmate and now Grant County Sheriff. I was back for our 40th high school reunion in 2004. Roland was running for sheriff. I was impressed by his “giving back to his community”. Roland had retired from the Oklahoma Highway Patrol and had plenty to keep him busy with farming his dad’s land. So, he didn’t need the extra hours of work or the money; it was purely his desire to “make a difference”; to clean up the meth labs; and maintain the quality of life for the citizens of Grant County.

Roland’s example caused me to decide to retire early, while I was still in good health, come home to Medford, and give back to my community, my state, and my nation.

I am thankful that this community has given me a strong foundation. I’m grateful for the good education I received in the Medford Public Schools and at Oklahoma State University. Education was the key that opened a world of opportunities for me.

However, I am most thankful that my teachers instilled in my classmates and I that we could be anything, do anything that we put our mind to do – that we truly had an “equal opportunity”.

Why I’m running:

I’m running because I care deeply about my country. I have a profound sense of personal responsibility to give back to my country, my state, and my community; and I aspire to “make a difference” – to leave our children, grand-children and future generations a better, stronger nation than what we inherited from our mothers and fathers.

I am committed to “doing the right thing” for our country. I’m committed to working with Republicans, Democrats, and independents to unite our country; to bridge the red/blue divide and to move this country forward in a positive and robust way.

There is too much division and polarization. We must come together and find common ground. Politicians and commentators use labels like “liberal”, “religious right”, “conservative” to divide us. They are being extremely lazy and divisive. They think that with the right label it is the end of the discussion, that we should close our minds, stop listening, and pretend only “our side” has all the answers and the only answers

I know I don’t have all the answers. That’s why I will listen to all sides, and work with all sides to find the best solutions for all Americans.

We all have had enough of the partisan bickering, enough of the nonsense, enough of the spin, and enough of putting political positioning and getting re-elected over doing what is best for America. There are too many issues that need action NOW. We need bold new leadership in Congress that is positive, optimistic, and has a “CAN-DO” attitude to tackle the big issues confronting America today.

I’m a realist and an optimist. I’m a realist in that I know we have much work to do to get America Back on Track and headed in the right direction. But, I’m optimistic because I know it can be done if we all come together and work together for what is best for our country and the world we live in. I have the vision for the future and the can-do attitude to Get America Back on Track.

One attribute that makes me highly qualified to run for office is that I am not a professional politician; and I’m not going to become a professional politician. I have the age and life experiences that I know I can keep my feet planted solidly in this good ol’ Oklahoma red dirt where I grew up. I will be the same trustworthy, honest, and straightforward man after I’m elected as I am today! You can count on that!

Leadership is about choices and priorities. For too long, Congress has taken no action; done nothing on the tough issues of the day. That must CHANGE! That is why it is time for CHANGE! It is time to tackle the tough issues. Issues like healthcare, supporting our veterans, education, war on terrorism, infrastructure, immigration, Social Security/Medicare, rural economic development – ALL need action NOW.

However, there are two issues that must be a priority.

Energy Independence and Climate Change

“We, as a nation, face two huge challenges. They are: our dependence on foreign oil; and the urgency of addressing climate change.”

“Today, they are the greatest threats to our national security, our economy, our way of life, and our place as the greatest nation on earth. And, they are threats, that if not addressed now, that will have serious consequences for decades to come.”

“We have to tackle these key threats with a national unity and purpose not seen since World War II. We must seek energy independence with a sense of utmost necessity, and for our economic security it is essential that we take the lead in addressing climate change. Both issues are so interconnected that they must be incorporated into one all encompassing national strategic energy plan.”

“I know I can provide the bold and visionary leadership we need in Congress. I know that working together, united in purpose, and taking action now; Americans CAN and Americans WILL prevail and make a difference for generations to come.”

The many other tough issues must be confronted too. But, if we don’t tackle energy independence and climate change NOW, our ability to effectively address the other issues for the long term will be severely limited and our children’s future less promising.

“I’m ready to lead! And, I’m ready to take action! I’m ready to Get America Back on Track!”

Where I am today:

I know I don’t have all the answers. And, I realize that in order to arrive at the best solution it is important to listen to all sides and to work together in a collaborative manner. But, I know how to “separate the wheat for the chaff”. I have the common sense and the intellect to recognize political “spin” or biased “facts” when I hear them.

It is most important that I listen to you! Too often in campaigns, it is the candidate who does all the talking. I will listen to you because I need to learn from you. I need to hear your thoughts, ideas, issues, and aspirations.

Because I am retired, I can devote my full time and energy to representing the people of Oklahoma. I will deem it an honor and a privilege.

That much repeated phrase: “United we stand; Divided we fall” is as true today as ever. I will stand up for you. You can count on me to stand up for what is right for America.

And, you can count on me to work to unite us as Americans.

But, YOU have a very important responsibility too! Last week, I had the privilege to speak to the summer school students (grades 1-6) on the subject of elections and their responsibility as citizens when they become eligible to vote. We talked about what it means that our country is a Republic.

We said the pledge of allegiance earlier – that phrase “and to the Republic for which it stands” is very important related to your role and responsibility as citizens and voters to effect change. A Republic is: A state or nation in which the supreme power rests in all the citizens entitled to vote -- THAT IS YOU! YOU have the power to effect change in your government. To complete the definition of a Republic: A Republic is: “A state or nation in which the supreme power rests in all the citizens entitled to vote -- “And is exercised by representatives elected by the citizens & responsible to the citizens” – THAT IS ME!

I will be responsible to you. I want you to hold me accountable!

Together, we will Get America Back on Track. America’s best days are still ahead of us!

The Time is NOW

It is time for Change

It is time to tackle the tough issues

It is time for Real Leadership for Oklahoma

It is time to “GET AMERICA BACK ON TRACK”!!

I humbly and respectfully ask for our support and your vote!

THANK YOU!

FISHING REPORT FOR JULY 23, 2008

CENTRAL

Arcadia: Largemouth bass slow. White bass good when surfacing early and late in the day. Channel and blue catfish fair on shrimp, punchbaits and cut shad around rocky points and the north side of the dam. Flathead catfish fair slip corking live bait off rocks and riprap. Report submitted by Mark Murray, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Arcadia:Elevation normal. Crappie fair to good on worms at 5 ft. around northern rocky points in morning. Report submitted by Linnie Mason, gate attendant.

Hefner: Elevation normal, water 85 and murky. White bass good on chartreuse sassy shad. Channel catfish good on cut shad and punchbaits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs along the dam. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Overholser: Striped bass hybrids good on live bait. Channel catfish fair on dough baits. Report submitted by Blake Pearson, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Thunderbird: Elevation normal and clear. White bass good off points and humps trolling with in line spinners, medium-diving crankbaits and sassy shad, also look for surfacing activity early mornings. Saugeye good off points at 7-10 ft. on sassy shad, jigs and medium-diving crankbaits, usually move into shallower water late evening to feed. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

Wes Watkins: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 83-87 and clearing. White bass being caught trolling with sliver and blue crankbaits at 8-10 ft. Crappie being caught on jigs around the dam. Catfish fair on chicken livers, shrimp, fresh cut bait, minnows and some stinkbaits. Largemouth bass fair on assorted soft plastics in early morning and Carolina-rigs good around road bed areas, points, grass beds and weed beds. Report submitted by M. Fowler.

NORTHEST

Bell Cow: Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits. Catfish good on stinkbait. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Birch: Elevation normal, water 87 and stained. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around brush piles and docks at 15 ft. Blue and channel catfish fair on cut shad, crayfish, and worms fishing near rocks at 2-8 ft. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and plastic worms in vegetation. Striped bass hybrids good on crankbaits trolling humps at 12-20 ft. and surfacing at dawn and dusk. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation normal, water 83 and normal. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits and topwaters. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 15-18 ft. Catfish fair on all baits. Striped bass hybrids fair trolling with crankbaits and grubs. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Chandler: Bass fair on plastics. Catfish fair on dough baits and stinkbaits. Crappie fair on minnows. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Copan: Elevation normal and murky. Crappie fair on minnow and jigs near submerged structure at 8-10 ft. Channel catfish are good on rod and reel, juglines with shad, stinkbait and worms. Flathead and channel catfish good below the dam on fresh cut, live shad, worms and chicken livers. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Eucha: Elevation slightly above normal, water 84 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around brush and structure at 10-12 ft. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits at night. Bluegill good on crickets and worms around grass beds. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 5 ft. above normal and steady, water 82 and murky. Largemouth bass good on salt crawls and crawdad colored worms in flooded grass and buck brush. White bass good on minnows, jigs, bucktail jigs, rattletraps and topwater lures around bridges above the dam; good on minnow and jigs below the dam. Catfish good drifting worms, shad and cut bait on mudflats; late evening and night is the best time for catfish on whole shad and minnows at 10 ft. with lights. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: Upper end: Elevation above normal, water 86 and clear. Largemouth bass excellent on all baits. Smallmouth bass good on small spinnerbaits in all rivers. White bass excellent on small spinnerbaits and minnows at night with lights in the water. Catfish excellent on secret seven dip bait, shad, sunfish, goldfish and shrimp at 25-40 ft. Crappie fair to good on minnows. Report submitted by Sam Williams, Grand Lake Sports Center .

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good topwater early on plastic worms around weed beds and on crankbaits and spinnerbaits in creek channels. Catfish good on cut baits and stinkbaits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at the fishing docks and brush structure. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hudson: Elevation 3 ft. above normal. Largemouth bass fair to good on plastic baits and spinnerbaits. White bass fair to good on small lures in the upper end of the lake. Blue and flathead catfish excellent on cut shad. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Rogers and Mayes Counties .

Hulah: Elevation normal and murky. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 8-10 ft. Channel catfish fair on cut shad. Blue and channel catfish good below the damn on live or fresh cut shad. Beginning July 21 the Hulah Dam will undergo routine structure inspections by the US Army Corp. of Engineers. State Highway 10 traffic will be unable to cross the dam during these inspections. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 7 ft. above normal, water 85 and murky. Crappie good on minnows and chartruese and black 1/16 oz jigs at 12-15 ft. under the Washunga Bay bridge. White bass good on slabs, in-line spinners, and jigs at the Kaw City and Washunga bridges. Blue catfish fair on juglines at 10-20 ft. in the Bear, Coon, and Washunga flats using cut shad for bait. Noodling for flatheads is good along the shelf rocks in the Burbank landing to Osage cove area. Striped bass hybrids and striped bass fair at dawn and dusk below the dam on five inch sassy shads in pearl and shad colors. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Keystone: Elevation 5 ft. above normal, water muddy. Largemouth bass fair on 8-10 inch plastic worms in dark colors at 4-8 ft. in flooded cover. Smallmouth bass slow on chartreuse crankbaits at 8-12 ft. around points. Spotted bass fair on small crankbaits and 6 inch plastic worms at 5-10 ft. around bluffs in deep coves. White bass good on minnows and jigs at 4-8 ft. below the dam early morning. Striped bass good on bucktails and swim baits at 4-8 ft. below the dam. Channel catfish fair on stinkbaits and worms at 6-10 ft. in creeks and coves. Blue catfish good on cut shad and punchbaits at 8-12 ft. in flats along creek channels. Flathead catfish fair on goldfish and large shiners at 8-12 ft. in riprap below the dam. Crappie fair on minnows and tube jigs at 8-12 ft. along riprap near culverts and under bridges. Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Lower Illinois: Elevation above normal, water 59 and murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits at 2-4 ft. in weed beds. Striped bass good on cut baits at 5-8 ft. all along river. Channel catfish good on cut baits at 5-8 ft. all along river. Crappie slow on spinnerbaits at 2-4 ft. in mouth of river. Trout good on power baits and spinnerbaits at 2-4 ft. at the dam and Watt’s Place. Report submitted by D. Tracy, Town of Gore .

Oologah: Elevation 6 ft. above normal and falling. Water 80 and muddy. Blue catfish fair on juglines baited with shad fishing on flats at 15-20 ft. White bass and crappie are also fair below the dam. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation normal, water 80’s and clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits off deep points. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on topwater lures in the main body of the lake. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around bridges. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: Channel, blue and flathead catfish good on cut bait and live bait off points and channels. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Spavinaw: Elevation slightly above normal, water 84 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around the dam area. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits. Bluegill good on crickets and worms. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Webbers Falls: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits in creek channels and riprap. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Channel catfish excellent on waterdogs and shad. White bass and striped bass hybrids excellent trolling crankbaits. Walleye fair trolling crankbaits and drifting night crawlers. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

Ft. Supply: Elevation normal, water clear. Channel catfish fair on stinkbaits and cut shad all over lake. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation normal, water 84 and stained. White bass being caught early on topwaters. Crappie good on brush piles using curly tailed jigs. Bass fair to good, topwaters early, jigs, Carolina rigs and drop shot during day. Channel catfish good at baited holes with bream excellent using flyrod and popping bugs. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 83 and clear. Bass good on soft plastics and in-line spinnerbaits. Catfish good on liver and worms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Water mid-80’s and clear. Largemouth and spotted bass fair at topwater with schooling fish in the mornings and late evening and after dark on soft plastics around points and structure. Catfish slow on juglines and trotlines. Crappie good on minnows around structure and upper end of lake. Walleye being caught on deep running crankbaits and jigs after dark around points and rocky bluffs with the full moon. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation normal, water clear in the east and murky in the west. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits in rocky areas and points. White bass fair in riprap under bridges. Blue catfish fair drifting shad in shallow flats. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 8-10 ft. under bridges. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation normal, water 85. Crappie and bass fishing is slow. Catfish fair on trotlines and juglines baited with sunfish and shad. Blue catfish good in the tailwaters on worms and cut shad. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 85 and clear. Largemouth bass good on topwater lures and crankbaits at 5-8 ft. around schooling bass early and late. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits at 10-12 ft. off points. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

Lower Mountain Fork River: Trout petty good early and late in the day on dry flies. Light colored spent spinner early in the day, or possibly a light Cahill, PMD, or elk hair caddis dryfly. During the hotter times of the day, you will probably do better with a sinking fly. Try flies like Soft Hackles, egg patterns, san juan worms, Y2K bugs, and yes, wooly buggers. The powerhouse has not been releasing much water lately, and zone 2 has been fishing a little poorly. Report submitted by Beavers Bend Fly Shop.

McGee Creek: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 86 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on plastic craws and crawfish colored crankbaits at 6-18 ft. along rocky points and also on topwater lures early and late. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Elevation normal, water 84 and clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass slow on minnows and jigs early and late. White bass slow on minnows and jigs at night. Channel catfish slow on minnows and jigs at night. Walleye slow on minnows and jigs at night. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation normal, water murky. Bass good in the early morning in the upper ends of creeks and up the river channel on topwater baits especially chugbugs and Pop-Rs. During late evening they are fair on Texas rigged grubs and tubes. Crappie fair in the early morning on jigs. Catfish good on jugs on stinkbait. Report Submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water 84 and murky. Largemouth bass fair from the surface to 6 ft. using topwater baits early and late and jigs and plastic baits during the day fishing the weed, rock and woody edges next to the deeper water. Crappie fair at 8 ft. on minnows fishing the brush structure in the old creek channels. White bass fair at 8 ft. trolling crankbaits in the lower end of the lake. Blue and flathead catfish fair at 10-20 ft. using live bait on juglines and trotlines. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Bass good to fair on plastics around points and creek channels and around riprap and around cover on spinnerbaits. Crappie good off of Jack Fork bridge with minnows and around brush. Flathead catfish fair to good on live bait on jugs or trotlines. Blue and channel catfish good on jugs and trotlines on cut bait or shrimp. White bass good trolling around islands and on plugs and when found surfacing. Walleye slow to fair trolling around islands and rip raft. Report submitted by Alan Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 86 and clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on crankbaits and some topwater baits off the points and in the coves. Striped and white bass good on live bait, sassy shad and topwaters from Platter Flats south. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on live bait, cut baits and worms north of the highway 70 bridge. Crappie slow. Sunfish good on worms along the shoreline. All other fishing is slow at this time. Report

submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 7 ft. below normal and dropping. Fishing is slow with some action in the deeper waters. Walleyes poor to fair; biting on minnows. Striped bass hybrids poor to fair on minnows. Crappies poor. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Ellsworth: Elevation normal, water murky. Catfish fair around Goose Island on punch bait. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Ft. Cobb: Elevation normal. Catfish slow on punchbait or stinkbait. Striped bass hybrids sow to fair on crankbaits. Saugeye slow to fair drifting night crawlers. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County .

Tom Steed: Blue and channel catfish good on live and cut bait on juglines. Striped bass hybrids fair on red and green lures in deep water. Bank fishing is average; with traditional worms and minnows yielding many mixed species bags of smaller fish. Report submitted by Robin Pugh, game warden stationed in Tillman County .

Waurika: Elevation normal, water murky. Blue catfish good on trotlines and juglines with shad. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County .

During a special town board meeting in Lamont Monday evening, police chief Sim Warrior was instructed to start writing citations to Lamont residents for violation on city code for over grown weeds and talk grass in their yards.

Mr. and Mrs. Rex Hembree attended the meeting to complain because of the way Lamont was looking and asked the town trustees what had been done to handle the grass and weed problem. Stating some yards had not been mowed all season.

Other items on the agenda Monday evening was an interview with Larry Richey, CPA, PC, of Enid as auditor for Lamont. After the brief introduction of his background, the Lamont Board hired Mr. Rickey as Lamont auditor.

The board tabled the expected appointment of a new trustee and Mayor during the meeting. Although, Jeff Tebow was appointed to act as interim Mayor until the regular August meeting. The mayor position became vacant after the resignation of Ann Rohrs during the regular July meeting.

Police chief Warrior ask the board what he should do about overtime accumulating in his department. The board told Warrior that they were not in the position at this time to pay any of the departments overtime. That if he was called out on an emergency to work the extra hours off the following day or anyway it could be scheduled.

The latest Oklahoma Crop Weather Update according to the Ron Hays farm report, indicates that we made good crop progress across the state in the latest week. It was generally a warm and dry week, with only .15 inch of rain on average fell around the state.

Corn silking reached 59 percent, an increase of 4 percentage points from last week but 20 points behind normal. Thirty-seven percent of the corn crop had reached the dough stage, up eight points from the previous week but four points behind the five-year average. Thirteen percent of the corn crop was beginning to dent. Sorghum planting was virtually completed by week's end. Sorghum emerged was at 76 percent, a 13 point jump from the previous week, but 19 points behind normal. Twenty-two percent of the State's sorghum had headed, an increase of 11 points from the previous week. A small percentage of the State's sorghum acreage was coloring by Sunday. Soybean planting was nearly completed by week's end. Soybeans emerged were at 92 percent, an increase of seven points from the previous week and two points ahead of the five-year average. Soybeans blooming were at 46 percent by the end of the week, a large increase of 22 points from the previous week and 10 points ahead of normal. Peanuts pegging increased seven points from the previous week to reach 81 percent, while peanuts setting pods were at 54 percent, seven points ahead of normal. Cotton squaring increased 15 points to reach 64 percent, 12 points behind normal, and 17 percent of the State's cotton acreage was setting bolls by week's end.

Pasture and range conditions were rated in the good to fair categories in 81% of the state's rangeland. The poorest ratings- poor to very poor- were found in 10% of the state.

A farm accident Thursday July 17th at 5:45 left a Grant County farmer fatality injured when according to the Oklahoma Highway Patrol report, Derek Bret Hall, 47 Nardin was working his ground two miles east and .4 mile south of Deer Creek.

According to the report Hall was using a 1991 Ford Versatile 4X4 tractor pulling a 30 foot disk when according to the report for unknown reasons (possible heart attack) crossed a deep washout in the field and the tractor door came open.. Hall according to the report was ejected from the tractor at which time the tractor and disk ran over him.

The report stated seatbelts were equipped but not in use and Hall’s condition listed on the report as “odor of alcohol.”

Chris Ferrell, Medford’s newest police officer has successfully finished his field-training program and started patrolling the streets and protecting the citizens’ of Medford July 14, 2008.

Ferrell is a 2003 Medford High School graduate and a former Grant County dispatcher. Ferrell has been in Law enforcement since 2006 and completed his reserve officer training in 2007.

Ferrell will start his CLEET training within the next six months to become a certified officer of the state of Oklahoma.

Chris, is the son of Tony Ferrell, Medford

Acccording to the Ron Hays Farm Report, the USDA has announced that producers who would otherwise be ineligible for the new disaster assistance programs, SURE, can become eligible by requesting a waiver and paying a fee. The 2008 Farm Bill was not finalized until deadlines had passed to sign up for crop insurance, required to participate in the new program. Because of that, USDA is offering a one-time waiver in exchange for a "buy-in fee," which a press release said would equal the applicable 2008 non-insured crop disaster assistance (NAP) coverage fees or the catastrophic risk protection plan fees for the land in question.

The buy-in fee is due no later than Sept. 16, 90 days after the date of enactment of the 2008 Farm Bill. Those who do not carry the proper crop insurance AND do not pay the buy-in fee will not be eligible for disaster assistance.

Producers should contact their local FSA office for more information or to file the waiver application and pay the fee. USDA has said funds from the new program, dubbed "SURE" for Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program, won't likely be available until next year due to the rulemaking process and technology issues.

Lamont Mayor Resigns

A tearful Lamont Mayor Ann Rohrs resigned from her office during the Monday July 14 town council meeting. Rohrs stated other responsibilities in her life and not enough time for her to devote what she felt the mayor position needed.

Rohrs stated during the 5 years she had been with the town board there had been good times and not so good times. However, that she was quite happy the way things were now. She felt that the town employees were doing an excellent job including the police chief Sims Warrior and fire Chief J.J. Stacy. She hoped everyone would continue to support them. After Rohrs resignation, she excused herself and left the meeting.

Grant County To Receive Storm Damage Assistance

Grant County is one of 24 Oklahoma Counties to receive federal assistance for severe storm damage last month, Gov. Brad Henry announced Wednesday.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency approved the governor's request for aid, ensuring that federal funding will assist cities, towns and counties with infrastructure repairs and other related costs.

The assistance will help with damages caused by storms, tornadoes and flooding that occurred from June 3 to June 20.

The counties which will receive the aid, in addition to Grant County, are Alfalfa, Beaver, Beckham, Blaine, Cotton, Custer, Dewey, Ellis, Garfield, Kay, Harmon, Harper and Jackson, Kiowa, Major, Okfuskee, Osage, Ottawa, Roger Mills, Rogers, Tillman, Washita and Woods counties.

Other counties can be added to the declaration as additional information becomes available.

"The torrential storms that pounded parts of Oklahoma throughout June caused significant damages," Henry said. "On behalf of those communities that were hit hard, I am grateful that President Bush and FEMA officials have approved public assistance."

The storms resulted in more than $9.6 million in infrastructure damage, particularly to roads, bridges and rural electric cooperatives.

If Texas Governor Wins His Waiver of Renewable Fuel Standard- Gas Prices Will Jump Higher.

An expert on energy markets warns that gas prices would jump almost immediately if the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grants Texas Governor Rick Perry's request for a partial waiver of the renewable fuels standard. Energy market writer and publisher Tom Waterman says - five dollar gasoline will just be the beginning. Waterman says - prices in California within one month would reach $5.75 per gallon and head to six dollars per gallon by summer's end. The rest of the country would follow.

Waterman projected that - U.S. refiners would immediately be faced with finding roughly 1.6 million barrels or 68 million gallons of gasoline per day. Waterman's comments were part of a post on a Web site maintained by the Renewable Fuels Association.

According to the posting, Waterman's insight presents the corollary to what many have recognized, the fact that corn-based ethanol has helped keep gasoline prices from being even higher, by reducing the amount of petroleum needed in the United States.

North Central Oklahoma Milo Crop Looking Good!

It appears that we have a good grain sorghum crop in the making in north central Oklahoma. This report is from Garfield County milo producer James Wuerflein,

"The early milo had the same to slightly more acres planted than last year. 90% of it looks excellent. It needed a rain as we were trying to head out last week and we received 1.5 inches Tuesday through Wednesday morning. It should head out fine. The emerged heads are huge like last years. The double-crop acres are several times more than anytime I can remember. It has a full moisture profile under it so it has great early potential. More acres would have been planted but there were not enough planters and no-till drills to get all of what people wanted in the ground. Planting was delayed some by the wet June we had. If it rains this summer/early fall the elevators will have to learn to handle a huge crop. There will need to be some education of farmers on cultural practices of planting on low pH soil, herbicide carryover restrictions, fertility and other best management practices." Said Wuerflein

Ponca City Man Charged With Harassing Deputy

A Ponca City man, Christopher Keith Krider, 21, charged in Grant County district court July 8 on two-misdemeanor charges of placing obscene/threatening/harassing telephone calls and obstructing an officer.

According to the affidavit filed, Deputy Jeremy Brittain contacted Krider on July 2 concerning allegedly harassing telephone calls and text messages Krider was allegedly making to a Lamont resident. The affidavit stated Brittain told krider he needed to stop.Krider, according to the affidavit stated he would.

On July 3 according to court records, Krider called Brittain and told deputy Brittain that there was noting he could do to him and that he was not going to stop making telephone calls and sending text messages.

The affidavit stated that on July 7 Krider started calling deputy Brittain approximately 10 times during July 7 and making harassing and threatening calls. The affidavit further said that Krider stated to Brittain that someone was going to die.

Pond Creek Man Charged With Debit Card Theft

A Pond Creek man, Steven Kyle Betchan, 22, charged in Grant County district court July 7 on one felony count of taking a debit card.

According to the affidavit filled by Steven Young, Assistant District Attorney stated, sometime between the 15th day of June and the 16th day of June 2008, Betchan took a debit card from a resident in Pond Creek.

The City National Bank of Enid issued the card to Casey Wilson. According to court records, the card allegedly taken from the Wilson resident when Betchan picked up two children for Father’s Day.

The affidavit further stated Wilson noticed that her missing debit card was back on her dresser on June 17 after a visit from Betchan to return the car seats he had forgotten to leave on Father’s Day.

A Withdrawal made on the card of $75.00 plus a $1.00 transaction fee, according to the affidavit, made at the First State Bank ATM at Pond Creek. The withdrawal was made on June 15.

Steven Kyle Betchan has posted a $2,000 bond, awaiting his first court date.

A construction crew with Evans & Associates from Ponca City has been contracted to build a new parking lot on the north-side of Cardinal Field and replace the old track.

Material from the old track was pulverized by Evans and recycled for the base for the north-side parking.

Funds from a bond issue approved earlier in the year by Medford voters is being used to fund the new track. Other upgrades being paid through the bond issue are a complete technology upgrade through-out the school and a new heating system.

The Board of Medical Licensure

And Supervision will meet July 17-18, 2008

This meeting of the Board will be held at the office of the Board of Medical Licensure and Supervision, 5104 North Francis Avenue, Suite C, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on July 17-18, 2008 in accordance with the Administrative Procedures Act and Open Meeting Act of Oklahoma.

July 17, 2008

9:00

*Kimberlee R. Mixon, P.A. – Disciplinary hearing alleging violation of probation and substance abuse

___ *Wesley E. Parkhurst, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging physical conduct with a patient which is sexual in nature

___ *Dhyia Ibrahim Al Qutshan, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging sexual misconduct and probation/suspension from residency program

___ *Dana Stull, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging substance abuse; violation of

probation

___ *Kenneth Kirk, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging violation of probation

ANNOUNCEMENTS

___ *John T. Haskins, M.D. – Complaint dismissed

___ *David Paul Crass, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing continued

___ *David R. Mitchell, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing continued

___ *Millard L. Henry, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing continued

___ *Paul A. Howard, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing continued

___ *Brian K. Rich, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing continued

___ *Kenneth M. Duffy, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing continued

FISHING REPORT FOR JULY 9, 2008

CENTRAL

Arcadia: Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits early and late. White bass fair trolling, beginning to school. Channel and blue catfish good on whole shad and punch baits at night around rocky points. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at night around the heated dock and structure. Report submitted by Mark Murray, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Thunderbird: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal and clear. White bass good on medium-diving crankbaits, spoons, sassy shad and in-line spinnerbaits off points and humps while trolling or wading. Saugeye good on medium-diving crankbaits, spoons, sassy shad and in-line spinnerbaits off points and humps while trolling or wading just after daylight and just before dark. Largemouth bass topwater baits early in the morning in weed beds. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

Wes Watkins: Elevation normal, water 82. Largemouth bass fair to good late evenings. White bass starting to school late afternoon. Channel catfish fair to good late evening. Bluegill good in shallows around boat docks. Report submitted by Mike France, game warden stationed in Pottawatomie County .

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Bass good on plastics. White bass fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish good on cut baits and dough baits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Birch: Elevation above normal, water 85 and stained. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around brush piles at 15 ft. Sunfish excellent on worms and minnows at 6-15 ft. around structure. Blue and channel catfish fair on cut shad, crayfish, and worms fishing near rocks at 2-8 ft. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and plastic worms in flooded vegetation. Striped bass hybrids good on crankbaits trolling humps at 12-20 ft. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation normal, water 82 and murky. Catfish good on cut and live bait. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Chandler: Elevation normal, water muddy. Largemouth bass good on plastics. Catfish good on dough baits and stinkbaits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Copan: Elevation 6 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie fair on minnow and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Channel catfish good on rod and reel, juglines with shad, stinkbait and worms. Flathead and channel catfish slow on fresh cut and live shad below the dam. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Eucha: Elevation slightly above normal, water 84 and murky. Crappie action picked up last week on jigs and minnows at 10-12 ft. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits at night. Bluegill good on crickets and worms. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 12 ft. above normal and steady, water 83 and murky. Largemouth bass slow in flooded grass and woody plants around trees. White bass good above the dam trolling jigs, sassy shad, rattletraps and spinnerbaits and good below the dam on jigs and spinnerbaits on the east and west sides. Catfish good on whole shad and chicken liver drift fishing the mud flats. Paddlefish good below the dam. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: Upper end: Elevation above normal and dropping, water 84 and clearing. Largemouth bass good on all baits at 2-10 ft. off points and coves. Smallmouth bass good on small spinnerbaits and white grubs in the upper rivers. White bass good on minnows and grubs at 2-10 ft. at night with lights near bridges and docks. Catfish good on stinkbaits, shrimp, cut shad and whole shad at 3-20 ft. around rocky areas. Crappie fair on minnows at 4-8 ft. all over the lake. Report submitted by Sam Williams, Grand Lake Sports Center .

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on topwater lures and plastic worms in weed beds and along shorelines. Catfish good on cut baits and stinkbaits on bottom near the spillway. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around fishing docks and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hudson: Elevation above normal. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad in the upper end below the dam. Crappie fair on minnows. Paddlefish snagging fair to good. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Rogers and Mayes Counties .

Hulah: Elevation 13 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Channel catfish fair on cut shad. Blue and channel catfish slow on live and fresh cut shad below the dam. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 18 ft. above normal, water 85 and muddy. Blue and channel catfish fair on cut shad, worms, grasshoppers and stinkbait from Coon Creek to Traders bend. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs under bridges at 12-15 ft. White bass fair on jigs, kastmaster spoons and slabs under bridges. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Keystone: Elevation 10 3/4 ft. above normal, water muddy. Largemouth bass fair on plastics and spinnerbaits at 3-6 ft. in flooded cover in coves and creeks. Smallmouth bass slow on crankbaits at 6-12 ft. around points. Spotted bass fair on small crankbaits and small jigs at 4-8 ft. in flooded cover on steep main lake banks. White bass fair on minnows and jigs at 4-8 ft. below the dam and under bridges. Striped bass fair below the dam on bucktails and live shad at 4-8 ft. and fair on the lake on live shad and deep diving crankbaits at 18-24 ft. around main lake points. Channel catfish fair on chicken liver and worms at 6-10 ft. in coves and creeks. Blue catfish fair on cut shad and punchbaits at 8-12 ft. around secondary points in coves and creeks, and along riprap. Flathead catfish good on goldfish and live shad at 6-10 ft. below the dam. Crappie slow below the dam on minnows and jigs at 4-6 ft. and slow on minnows and jigs at 8-12 ft. under bridges. Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Lower Illinois: Elevation above normal, water 57 and murky. Largemouth bass slow on spinnerbaits at 2-3 ft. in back water coves. Striped bass good on live bait at 3 ft. all along river. Striped bass hybrids slow on live bait at 3 ft. all along river. Channel catfish good on cut bait at 3-8 ft. all along river. Blue catfish fair on cut bait at 8 ft. at the mouth of the river. Walleye slow on crankbaits at 6-8 ft. in deep holes. Trout fair on power bait at 5 ft. above Gore Landing. Report submitted by D. Tracy, Town of Gore .

Oologah: Elevation 10 ft. above normal and falling, water 80 and muddy. Blue catfish fair on juglines baited with shad fishing on flats at 15-20 ft. White bass and crappie fair below the dam. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 5 ft. above normal, water mid-80’s and murky. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around bridges and riprap. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastics while jigging flooded timber. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair drifting live shad over open water at 10-20 ft. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on slabs and live shad off Crappie Point and towards the dam. Catfish good on cut bait and live bait around points. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs along Hwy. 177 and Hwy. 15. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Spavinaw: Elevation slightly above normal, water 83 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around the dam area. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits. Bluegill good on crickets and worms. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Tenkiller: Elevation 5 1/2 ft. above normal, water 80-82 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits, soft bass jigs and spinnerbaits in shallow brush. Catfish fair on juglines with cut bait. Sunfish good in docks or along bluffs on night crawlers. Report by Monte Brooks Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits in creek channels and riprap. Catfish good on stinkbaits, worms and cut baits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush structure and bridges. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. White bass and striped bass hybrids good trolling crankbaits and drifting slabs near drop-offs. Walleye fair trolling crankbaits and drifting night crawlers. Channel catfish fair on live bait and stinkbait in upper end of the lake. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation normal, water 84 and stained. Crappie good on brush piles. White bass chasing shad in mid-lake early and late, on topwater lures and rattletraps. Channel catfish good on baited holes. Bass fair using Texas-rigged lizard, Carolina rigs and topwater lures early morning. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 82 and clear. Bass fair on minnows and flies. Catfish good on liver and worms. Report submitted by David Walker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Water clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on soft plastics in the morning and evening. Catfish fair on juglines and trotlines with cut shad. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 25-30 ft. around structure. Walleye slow, due to moon phase, on deep running crankbaits around islands and points. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on plastics flipping the flooded brush. White bass good on jigs in riprap near the bridges. Catfish good on shad at 4-10 ft. in rocky areas. Crappie good on minnows at 8-20 ft. under bridges. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation normal, water 80. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits around the islands. Catfish fair on green sunfish along the river channels. Blue catfish very good on worms and shad in the tailwaters. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 85 and clear. Largemouth bass good on topwater lures and crankbaits at 5-8 ft. around schooling bass early and late. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits at 10-12 ft. off points. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

Lower Mountain Fork River: Trout good zone 2. Upper sections of zone 1 (in the park) continue to fish well. Good flies have been wooly buggers, soft hackles, midges and various nymphs. Report submitted by Beavers Bend Fly Shop.

McGee Creek: Elevation 1 2/3 ft above normal, 82 degrees and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic craws and crawfish colored crankbaits at 6-10 ft. along rocky points and weed beds and also on topwater lures early and late. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Elevation normal, water 82 and clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on soft plastic worms, crankbaits and jigs early and late. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits, minnows and worms. Walleye slow on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation above normal, water murky. Bass good on motor oil colored grubs when Texas-rigged. Crappie fair on minnows around structures in deep water. Catfish fair on chicken liver. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation above normal, water 82 and murky. Largemouth bass fair at 3-6 ft. using topwater lures early morning and plastic baits and jigs during mid-day fishing the weed, rock and woody shorelines. Crappie fair on minnows at 8 ft. around brush structure in the old creek channels. White bass slow at 8 ft. trolling crankbaits and jigs in the Applegate Cove area. Blue and flathead catfish good on juglines and trotlines with live bait at 3-8 ft. in the rocky areas around the lake. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Elevation 1 ft. above normal and slightly murky. Bass good on spinnerbaits, off points on plastics and in grass beds on spinnerbaits. White bass fair trolling islands. Catfish excellent on jugs and trotlines with shrimp and cut shad. Flathead catfish fair on juglines with live bait. Crappie excellent on live minnows at 10 ft. from the bottom under bridges and on jigs around timber. Walleye fair on plugs trolling the islands. Report submitted by Alan Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation normal, water 84 and mostly clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on crankbaits and plastic baits around underwater points. Striped and white bass good on live bait, sassy shad and surface baits from Platter Flats south. Channel and blue catfish good on live bait, cut shad and worms from Catfish Bay north. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs around fish attractors. Sunfish good on worms around the fishing docks. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastics and spinnerbaits. Crappie good on minnows, small spinnerbaits and jigs. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad and liver with jugs. Flathead catfish good on live sunfish in upper Poteau River . Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 5 ft. below normal and dropping. Walleye good on minnows. Striped bass hybrids fair on minnows. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Foss: Elevation normal, gates closed, water 81and clear. Striped bass hybrids good on live bait around islands on north side. Walleye fair on live bait along dam. White bass surfacing in morning hours, working with light colored jigs. Catfish good in channels. Bass fair along edges with a lot of cover. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: Elevation 1/3 ft. above normal. Catfish slow to fair on cut baits. Saugeye slow to fair on night crawlers. Striped bass hybrids fair on shad and trolling off points. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County

Waurika: Elevation normal, water 78 and murky. Blue catfish good on juglines and trotlines with cut bait and shad. Crappie fair on minnows at the marina. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County

Farmers Should Not Be Subject To CMV Regulations

Agricultural producers should be allowed to transport their commodities to market across state lines without being subject to Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) weight regulations for long-haul truckers. That's what Oklahoma Farm Bureau President Mike Spradling told a congressional subcommittee Wednesday in Washington, D.C.

Testifying before the House Subcommittee on Highways and Transit, Spradling said the nature of farming and ranching has changed and producers need the ability to transport goods long distance. "Concentration within the agriculture industry has reduced the number of grain elevators, cotton gins and livestock markets forcing producers to drive longer distances, often across state lines, to sell their commodities," Spradling said. Under current law, crossing state lines changes the classification from intrastate carrier to interstate carrier, triggering commercial requirements.

Spradling, was testifying on behalf of the American Farm Bureau, believes increasing the minimum weight requirement from the current 10,001 pounds to 26,001 pounds would ease the problem. During the annual American Farm Bureau convention in January delegates made uniform federal truck weights a priority issue.

Tuesday afternoon rain storm resulted in 1.07 inches according to Mesonet. With radar showing more showers to the west of Grant County moving this way.

Controlled hunt results available online July 9

Applicants can find out if they were drawn for any of the hunts offered through the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation's Controlled Hunt program beginning 8 a.m. July 9 by logging onto the Department’s web site at wildlifedepartment.com.

Once applicants log on to the Web site, they can click on the "Controlled Hunts Results" banner and enter their last name, date of birth, and either their Social Security or driver’s license number. The system will only access the Controlled Hunts results database when the correct number matches with the hunter’s other information.

Sportsmen without readily available Internet access can check their results at computer terminals available at the Department's headquarters and regional offices during those offices’ regular business hours. In addition, many local libraries offer Internet access. Applicants should check with their local library for Internet services and user-policies. Successful applicants will also be notified by mail.

The opportunity to hunt on some of Oklahoma’s most unique and desirable hunting properties have made the Department’s controlled hunts program one of the most popular programs in the country.

Every once and awhile, you hear something that just makes you want to laugh.

John Kerry said Sunday Republican John McCain doesn’t have the judgment to be president.

To take you back in time, McCain rejected Kerry’s overtures to form a bipartisan ticket during the 04’ Presidential Race. This ticket would have put Kerry in the Whitehouse. I wonder if Kerry is harboring any bad feelings.

Recently, Kerry was accusing McCain of poor decision-making on everything from backing tax cuts for the wealthy to making support for continuing the U.S. military presence in Iraq.

“John McCain … has proven that he has been wrong about every judgment he’s made about the war. Wrong about the Iraqis paying for the reconstruction, wrong about whether or not the oil would pay for it, wrong about Sunni and Shia violence through the years, wrong about the willingness of the Iraqis to stand up for themselves,” Kerry, who supports Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama, said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.”

“If you like the Bush tax cut and what it’s done to our economy, making wealthier people wealthier and the average middle class struggle harder, then John McCain is going to give you a third term of George Bush and Karl Rove,” the Massachusetts senator added...shall I also mention that these words actually echo an Obama campaign talking point.

To question McCain's judgment and ability to be President is down right laughable. SEN John McCain is more than qualified to be President of the United States.

Once again, John Kerry has proven to be incapable of communicating the truth. Then again, I guess that is why they call it `politics as usual`.

The latest Crop Weather Update for Oklahoma shows that we are only a couple of percentage points away from the end of the 2008 Oklahoma Winter Wheat harvest.

According to Mark Hodges the Executive Director of the Oklahoma Wheat Commission, We have a better than fifty percent increase in the size of the wheat crop in the body of the state. While the Panhandle has fallen hard from what was a historically huge crop in 2007 to a half crop or less in 2008, because of exceptional drought in much of Texas and all of Cimarron Counties.

With a crop that is pushing a 160,000,000 bushels- we will have our first billion dollar gross receipts wheat crop ever in the state, and even with higher than ever input costs, net returns per acre have been eye popping for many wheat farmers this year. It is expected that this year's cash flow bounty will dry up to some extent in 2009. As high fuel costs raise the cost per acre of raising a wheat crop substantially.

Hodges says that the big disappointment in 2008 are the low protein levels that we have seen in much of the main body of the state- and he says that he believes that is a result of a couple of factors. The first factor is that many farmers assumed they had adequate nitrogen in the soil after not producing much of a crop in 2007 even as nitrogen prices went higher and higher, scaring many producers away from doing the right thing for maximum production as they decided to forego any late mid-season top dressing. Hodges believes that much of this nitrogen from 2007 was leached too deep into the soil to be useful to the 2008 crop.

Hodges goes on to say, that if you look at this crop from strictly a miller's perspective- they will love it as it will produce a high yield of flour- however that quantity is offset by lower protein levels which will not appeal to many end users. The question still to be resolved from the testing of this 2008 crop will come from the baking tests. Hodges says he is hopeful that the baking tests will show that even with the lower protein, the functionality of the dough from the flour form this wheat is still there, if that is the case, That will be a huge selling point in dealing with customers who normally want our hard red winter wheat for its relatively high protein percentages.

The Medford fire department responded to a wheat field fire five miles west on SH 11 one mile south and a half west to a field belonging to Jack Rickabaugh.

The cause of the fire is undetermined although it appeared to have started in the ditch next to the roadway.

According to Rickabaugh approximately 30 acres of field burned. Rickabough stated the field had already been hailed out earlier in the year.

John Benningfield is shown exiting a Medford tanker during a wheat field fire Thursday July 3rd.

FISHING REPORT FOR JULY 2, 2008

CENTRAL

Overholser: Channel catfish good on crawdad tails at night. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around docks. Report submitted by Blake Pearson, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Thunderbird: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water clear. Saugeye good on sassy shad, jigs and medium-diving crankbaits early and late day off points. White bass good on slabs, sassy shad, medium-diving crankbaits and inline spinnerbaits off humps and points at 10-12 ft. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation normal, water muddy. Bass good on spinnerbaits and plastics. White bass good on cut baits and dough baits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Birch: Elevation above normal, water 84 and stained. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around brush piles at 5-10 ft. Blue and channel catfish fair on cut shad and worms fishing near flooded timber at 2-8 ft. Largemouth bass fair in flooded vegetation on spinnerbaits and worms. Striped bass hybrids fair trolling humps with crankbaits at 12-20 ft. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Chandler : Elevation normal, water murky. Bass fair on plastics. Channel catfish good on dough baits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Copan : Elevation 11 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie fair on minnow and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Channel and blue catfish good on rod and reel, juglines with shad, stinkbait and worms. Flathead and channel catfish fair on fresh cut bait, live shad and worms below the dam. Fishing activity is best in the early morning and late evening hours. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Ft. Gibson : Elevation 17 ft. and steady, water 82 and murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits in the flooded grass and buck brush during late evening and night. White bass good trolling rooster tails, sail-sharks and jitter baits around bridges and rocky points. Catfish good on shrimp and worms around rocks. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: Elevation 5 ft. above normal, water 78-85 and murky. There is full generation and four small flood gates open. Bass good on crankbaits, jigs, topwater lures, Carolina-rigs, and spinnerbaits from boats, in main lake and secondary points. Catfish good in the rivers and on juglines on shad and goldfish in mid-lake and Horse Creek area. White bass slow. Report submitted by Littlefield’s Sporting Goods and Greg Lamb’s Guide Service.

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on topwater lures, plastic worms, crankbaits and spinnerbaits in grass beds. Catfish fair on stinkbaits, worms and cut baits on bottom near the spillway. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around fishing docks and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hudson : Elevation above normal. Channel and blue catfish good on juglines with cut shad and trotlines with worms and cut shad. Paddlefish snagging fair to good on upper end of the lake. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Rogers and Mayes County .

Hulah: Elevation 19 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Channel catfish good on cut shad. Blue and channel catfish good below the dam on live and fresh cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 22 ft. above normal, water 84 and muddy. White bass fair on slabs, jigs and spinnerbaits under Kaw City and Washunga Bay bridges. Blue catfish fair on cut shad in Coon Creek and Bear Creek areas. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 12-15 ft. in the Beaver arm. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Lower Illinois : Elevation above normal, water 58 and murky. Largemouth bass slow on crankbaits at 5 ft. in coves, backwater and weed beds. White bass slow on jigs at 6 ft. in the mouth of river. Striped bass good on cut baits at 2-8 ft. at Gore landing. Striped bass hybrids fair on topwater lures and spinnerbaits at 3-6 ft. below Gore landing. Channel catfish good on cut shad at 2-12 ft. Blue catfish fair on cut baits at 2-12 ft. Walleye fair on diving plugs and jigs at 2-12 ft. from Hwy. 64 bridge to north river. Trout slow on power baits at 2- 5 ft. from Gore landing to the dam. Report submitted by D. Tracy, Town of Gore .

Oologah: Elevation 15 ft. above normal and falling, water 80 and muddy. Blue catfish fair on juglines with shad at 15-20 ft. on flats. White bass and crappie fair below the dam. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 5 3/4 ft. above normal, water low 80’s and murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits in the lower end of the lake. Striped bass hybrids being caught on live shad at 10-20 ft. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 8-12 ft. around bridges and riprap. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: White bass fair on slabs and live shad near the dam and on topwater lures around the south end of the dam in the evening. Striped bass hybrids fair on slabs and live shad near the dam. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Tenkiller: Elevation 5 1/2 ft. above normal, water 80-82 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits, soft bass jigs and spinnerbaits in shallow brush. Catfish fair on juglines with cut bait. Sunfish good on night crawlers in docks or along bluffs. Report by Monte Brooks, Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls : Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits in creek channels and riprap. Catfish good on stinkbaits and cut baits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush structure and bridges. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton : Elevation normal. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair trolling crankbaits near islands. Channel catfish good on minnows and night crawlers near the Longdale area. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

Ft. Supply : Elevation above normal, water clear. Channel catfish fair on cut shad and stinkbaits below the dam. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle : Elevation normal, water 84 and stained. White bass good on topwater lures and wiggle-tail jigs. Crappie good on marked brush piles at 17 ft. Bass good on lizards on Carolina-rig, topwater lures early and drop shot. Channel catfish good on cut bait and dough baits. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River : Elevation normal, water 80 and clear. Catfish fair to good on liver and worms. Bass fair to good on minnows and flies. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water 83 and clearing. Largemouth bass being caught schooling topwater in late evening. Catfish fair on juglines and trotlines with cut baits and shad. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 30 ft. around structure. Walleye fair after dark around points and islands with the full moon. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass good on buzzbaits and spinnerbaits in flooded brush and flipping small plastics in flooded timber. White bass good on jigs at 4-10 ft. in riprap under bridges. Blue catfish fair on shad and liver in rocky areas. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 8-25 ft. under bridges. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation normal, water 78. Crappie and white bass fair on minnows in the upper creek channel. Flathead catfish fair on green sunfish in the main lake. Blue catfish good on shad in the tailwater. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 85 and clear. Largemouth bass good on topwater lures and plastic worms at 5-8 ft. in weed beds. Channel catfish good on chicken livers at 10-12 ft. around points and discharge canal. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

McGee Creek: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water 80 and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic craws and crawfish colored crankbaits at 6-10 ft. along windy points. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray : Water 83 and clear. Bass excellent. White bass good trolling crankbaits and topwater lures. Catfish good on worms, chicken livers, stinkbaits and minnows. Crappie fair at 10-15 ft. around fish attracters. Walleye good on jigs, minnows and crankbaits. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation above normal water murky. Bass fair on red shad colored power bait worms. Crappie good on minnows around structures in deep water. Catfish fair on chicken liver and good on punch bait. White bass good on roadrunners around creek inlets. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Texoma: Elevation normal, water 80 and clear south and murky north. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on plastic baits and crankbaits around underwater structures. Striped and white bass good on live bait, sassy shad and cut shad near the islands. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad north of the Highway 70 bridge. Crappie fair on minnows around underwater structures. Sunfish good on worms around the fishing docks. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastics and spinnerbaits. Crappie good with minnows, small spinnerbaits and jigs. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad and liver with juglines. Flathead catfish excellent on live sunfish in the upper Poteau River . Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 3 1/2 ft. below normal and dropping. Walleye good on minnows. Striped bass hybrids good on minnows. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal and murky. Catfish fair to slow on cut bait and punch bait. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Ft. Cobb : Elevation 1/3 ft. above normal. Catfish slow to fair on cut baits. Saugeye slow to fair on night crawlers. Striped bass hybrids fair on shad and trolling off points. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County .

Waurika: Elevation normal, water 77 and murky. Blue catfish good on juglines, trotlines and rod and reel with whole and cut shad in the flats. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County .

This program operates free from discrimination on the basis of political or religious opinion or affiliation, race, creed, color, gender, age, ancestry, marital status or disability. A person who feels he or she may have been discriminated against or would like further information should write: Director, Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, P.O. Box 53465 , Oklahoma City , OK 73152 , or Office of Equal Opportunity, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington , D.C. 20240 .

Have you ever wanted to stay in touch with classmates? Ever tried web communities like classmates.com? Don't want to spend the money to register? Well, our Medford Oklahoma Online Magazine is about to roll out the Medford Oklahoma Alumni site. Currently, if you select the Alumni tab near the Events and Schedules tab, you will get a message saying that it is under construction. Here within about a week, the construction will be completed and you can create your own Alumni Page and stay in contact with other Medford Oklahoma Alumni...all for FREE. It is not as cool as MySpace or Classmates.com, but it gets the job done.

Stay tuned for more updates.

"The Lake Patrol Section of the Oklahoma Highway Patrol would like to

remind boaters venturing out for

Independence Day festivities that many of our lakes are significantly above

normal levels. The topography of these lakes will be different than when

they are at normal lake levels, and obstructions and hazards to navigation

may not be visible. In the past, boaters on unfamiliar waters when the

water is high have struck submerged picnic tables and charcoal grills,"

said Captain George Green, Boating Law Administrator.

"Additionally, we would like to remind boaters going out to watch fireworks

on the water of the importance

of anchoring from the bow. The bow is designed to ride up over waves and

wakes from other vessels

while waves and wakes from other vessels often break over the square stern

causing many boats to

swamp, then capsize," Captain Green said.

Troopers of the Lake Patrol Section will be out in force this weekend to

assist the boating public and

enforce the law. Troopers will be especially watching for violations of

Oklahoma's "Operating a

Vessel Under the Influence" laws, and safety violations including Reckless

Operation, Careless

Operation, proximity violations, and equipment violations such as

unapproved or too few life jackets.

Captain Green said, "The Kyle Williams Boating Safety Education Act, where

every operator between the ages of 12 and 16 must be supervised by an adult

and in possession of an approved boating safety education certification

card to operate a boat or personal watercraft, will be strictly enforced."

Harvest Continues, little rainfall of consequence fell across Oklahoma on Tuesday- based on Oklahoma Mesonet observations- allowing us to continue to see the drydown of the soggiest fields in mostly north central areas of the state. Gradually, we are seeing the wettest locations start to get the ground firmed up to allow combines to start pulling out the last of the 2008 Oklahoma winter wheat crop.

As of the beginning of the week- USDA had the 2008 crop 74% harvested- and that figure will be a little slower to grow this week because few custom crews remain in the state.

Seth Reeves is shown emptying a load of Grant county wheat at the Medford Farmers Grain elevator for Grant county farmer Gary Hula. It is a little nostalgic to see a farm wheat truck bring wheat to the elevators compared to the ever growing semi’s that seems to becoming the new norm for area farmers.

Wheatheart announces new program

Wheatheart Nutrition Project has announced a new program, “Courage to take Charge, Taking Control of your Health,” will be available July 2 in Pond Creek.

Developed in 1991 by Stanford University, this evidence-based program is used in the United States and 17 other countries. Through a grant made possible by Northern Oklahoma Development Authority, Wheatheart was able to hire two motivators and send them to Stanford University to become master trainers. They have been conducting workshops since May 2007.

The self-management workshop for people with chronic conditions are six weeks long, meeting only one day a week for two and one-half hours.

The sessions are interactive and participants receive a book, “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions.” The book has more than 200 hints from how to find resources and make treatment decisions. Participants also will receive a relaxation CD or cassette tape.

Session one gives the group general principles on self-management. It looks at the difference between chronic and acute diseases and identifies the common elements of various chronic health problems. Action plans and distraction techniques are introduced.

Session two shows the group how to manage anger, fear and frustration associated with chronic health conditions. Problem-solving techniques are introduced, as are types of exercise. Participants are encouraged to choose a fitness program appropriate for them.

In session three, participants explore the causes of shortness of breath and are introduced to better breathing and relaxation techniques. Participants also look at reasons for pain and fatigue, along with ways to manage them.

Session four gives an overview of good nutrition and reasons for eating better. Participants are given tools to make healthier eating choices. This session also looks at plans for future health care and introduces techniques for improving communication.

In session five, participants learn ways to follow medication regimens and how to reduce the side effects of medications. Guidelines are given for evaluating new treatments. Positive thinking and guided imagery are introduced during this session.

Session six presents tools on how to communicate with health care professionals, caregivers and family members; be more active in care; and create a plan to deal with health problems. Throughout this workshop, participants learn to evaluate and analyze action plans to help control health conditions.

This workshop is free and open to anyone who has a chronic disease or knows someone with a chronic condition.

For information, contact Peggy Hager at 237-4810.

PERSONAL INJURY COLLISION OCCURRED AT 07:15 A.M. ON 06/23/08 AT SH132

AND SH11 JCT. IN GRANT COUNTY.

VEHICLE ONE A 2000 CHEVOLET PK DRIVEN BY JAMES WENE WM AGE 79 OF HARPER,

KS.

TRANSPORTED BY MEDFORD EMS TO INTEGRIS BASS BAPTIST HEALTH CENTER IN

ENID. ADMITTED WITH HEAD AND ARM INJURIES. LISTED IN STABLE CONDITION.

VEHICLE TWO A 1998 FRHT TT DRIVEN BY JAMES ELLIOTT WM AGE 54 OF WAKITA.

TREATED AND RELEASED.

WHAT HAPPENED: VEHICLE ONE WAS SOUTHBOUND ON SH132. VEHICLE TWO WAS

WESTBOUND ON SH11. VEHICLE ONE FAILED TO YIELD FROM A STOP SIGN AND WAS

STRUCK BY VEHICLE TWO. DRIVER OF VEHICLE ONE WAS PARTIALLY EJECTED.

SEATBELTS: EQUIPPED - NOT IN USE VEHICLE ONE, UNKNOWN ON VEHICLE TWO

ROADWAY: DRY, ASPHALT

WEATHER: CLEAR

PINNED: N/A

EJECTED: PARTIALLY

DOT NUMBER ON FRHT #77383

CONDITION OF DRIVER: 01-APPARENTLY NORMAL

CAUSE OF COLLISION: 01-FAILURE TO YIELD

INVESTIGATED BY TROOPER JEFF JECH #650 OF THE GARFIELD CO DETACHMENT.

ASSISTED BY TRP. KEVIN EDSALL #406, GRANT CO. SHERIFF'S OFFICE, MEDFORD

EMS, HAWLEY AND NASH FIRE DEPARTMENT.

A plea docket is set for a former Medford man.

Arlando Martin Torres, 23, Nardin, in Kay County District Court for June 26.

Torres is charged with three felony counts of knowingly concealing stolen property.

He was arrested by Tonkawa police on Sept. 19 at the intersection of Fifth Street and Victory.

FISHING REPORT FOR JUNE 18, 2008

CENTRAL

Arcadia: Largemouth bass fair on plastics and spinnerbaits. Channel catfish good on cut shad off the dam. Crappie fair on minnows at the heated fishing dock. Report submitted by Mark Murray, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Hefner: Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad. Bluegill good on worms. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Overholser: Elevation above normal, water 80. Striped bass hybrids good on crankbaits. Channel catfish good on cut shad. Bluegill good on worms. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation normal, water muddy. Bass fair on plastics and crankbaits. White bass fair on minnows and jigs. Channel catfish fair on dough baits. Crappie fair on minnows an jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Birch: Elevation above normal, water lower 70's and stained. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush piles 6-15 ft. Blue catfish good on cut shad and worms at 2-5 ft. fishing flooded brush. Striped bass hybrids fair on chartreuse crankbaits and shad at 5-15 ft. off of the dam. Submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Osage County

Carl Blackwell: Elevation normal, water 80 and muddy. Striped bass hybrids fair on live bait and trolling crankbaits. Catfish fair on cut baits and punchbaits. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Chandler: Elevation normal, water muddy. Bass good on plastics. Channel catfish fair on dough baits and live baits. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Eucha: June 16. Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 72 and murky. Bluegill good on crickets and worms. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits. Catfish fair on juglines using cut shad. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 21 ft. above normal, water 79 and murky. Largemouth bass good on jerk baits in flooded grass and timber. White bass fair to good trolling bridges and flats. Catfish good on cut baits, chicken liver around rocky points and riprap in grassy flats. Bow fishing good to excellent in flooded grass during the day and night. Boaters need to use caution due to debris in the lake. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: Upper end: Elevation rising, water 82 and murky. Largemouth bass very good on spinnerbaits and buzz baits in shallow water all over lake. White bass very good on white grubs, minnows and greenhead/red tail grubs at 7 ft. around docks, brush and under bridges. Catfish good on worms, goldfish and secret seven stinkbait. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Carp very good on stinkbaits. Paddlefish very good below the dam. Report submitted by Sam Williams, Grand Lake Sports Center .

Grand: Water 78-85, above Horse Creek is muddy and Horse Creek to the dam is dirty to stained. Bass are being caught on crankbaits around points and on spinnerbaits and drop baits around the flooded bushes and trees. Catfish are being caught on shrimp and worms and on juglines with shad all over the lake. Noodling for flathead catfish good. White bass being caught on small crankbaits, firecracker grubs and jigging spoons, they are starting to surface feed in parts of Horse Creek and Elk River . Report submitted by Littlefield’s Sporting Goods and Greg Lamb’s Guide Service.

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and plastic worms around moss and weed beds. Catfish good on cut baits and stinkbaits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at fishing docks and around brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hudson: Elevation above normal, water murky. White bass good on small lures in the upper end of the lake. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad and worms. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Rogers and Mayes Counties .

Kaw: Elevation 22 ft. above normal and muddy. Blue and channel catfish good on worms from Bear Creek to Traders Bend. White bass good below the dam on jigs, sassy shads and in-line spinnerbaits. The only boat ramps currently open are Bear Creek, Burbank and Pioneer due to the high water. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Keystone: Largemouth bass slow on spinnerbaits with large blades, jigs and chunkbaits at 3-8 ft. in flooded cover in backs of coves and creeks. Smallmouth bass slow on crankbaits, jigs and chunkbaits at 8-12 ft. around points. Spotted bass slow on spinnerbaits, jigs and chunkbaits at 5-10 ft. around bluffs. White bass fair on minnows and jigs at 4-8 ft. below the dam. Striped bass fair on live shad and bucktails at 4-8 ft. below the dam. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits and worms at 5-10 ft. in coves and creeks. Blue catfish good on punchbaits and cut shad at 6-12 ft. below the dam and around points. Flathead catfish good on large shiners and shad at 6-12 ft. below the dam and around bluffs. Crappie slow on minnows and bright colored jigs at 4-8 ft. below the dam. Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Oologah: Elevation is 16 ft. above normal and still rising slowly, water mid-70's to near 80 and muddy. All boat ramps on the main lake are currently closed due to flood conditions. Crappie and white bass are fair on jigs below the dam. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 7 ft. above normal, water 80 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits in the lower end of the lake. Striped bass hybrids being caught on live shad at 10-20 ft. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 8-12 ft. around bridges and riprap. All other fishing is slow. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Spavinaw: June 16. Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 78 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around the dam area. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits. Catfish fair on juglines using cut shad. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Sooner: White bass and striped bass hybrids good on live shad and slabs. Crappie good on minnows and jigs along Hwy. 177 and Hwy. 15. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in

Tenkiller: Elevation 3 1/2 ft. above normal and steady, water clear. Largemouth bass good on soft plastic lizards in shallow brush. Catfish fair on stinkbaits at 20 ft. around points and drifting shad and minnows in shallow water. Sunfish fair on nightcrawlers at the docks. Report submitted by Monte Brooks, Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits around creek channels and brush structure. Catfish good on stinkbaits, cut baits and sunfish on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush structure and bridges. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation 11/2 ft. above normal. White bass and striped bass hybrids good trolling crankbaits and drifting slabs over submerged islands. Channel catfish good on stinkbait and live bait. Walleye fair on deep running crankbaits and night crawlers. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

Ft. Supply: Elevation above normal, water clear. Channel catfish fair on stinkbaits. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation normal, water 75 and stained in upper arms. Crappie good on marked brush piles. White bass are chasing shad in main lake area, use white sassy shads. Bass good using Carolina-rigs, topwater lures early and drop shot rigs in main lake. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water 83 and murky. Bass fair on minnows and flies. Catfish fair to good on liver and worms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Elevation rising, water murky. Largemouth and smallmouth bass being caught on soft plastics and crawfish colored crankbaits along points. Catfish good on juglines and trotlines with cut shad and sunfish. Crappie being caught on minnows and jigs in the upper end of the lake around structure. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 2 1/2 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on plastics flipping the flooded brush. White bass good on jigs in riprap near bridges. Blue catfish good on fresh shad at 3-8 ft. in rocky areas and riprap. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 8-20 ft. under bridges. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 74. Crappie and largemouth bass fair on lures and minnows along brush. Catfish fair to good on goldfish. Crappie and blue catfish fair in tailwaters. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 80 and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic worms and jerk baits at 3-8 ft. in weed beds and cattails. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits at 8-10 ft. along points. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

McGee Creek: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, 78 degrees, and clear in Potapo arm and murky in McGee arm. Largemouth bass fair to good on plastic craws and crawfish colored crankbaits at 6-10 ft along windy points. Crappie fair on minnows 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Channel catfish fair along riprap of dike on stinkbait. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass excellent on minnows, spinnerbaits, crankbaits and soft plastic jerk baits early and late. White bass good on minnows and jigs. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits, minnows and worms. Crappie fair at 10-15 ft. around brush piles. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation normal, water slightly murky. Bass fair around rocky points and submerged timber on 4 inch centipede-type soft plastics. Crappie fair on minnows in tops. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers on rod and reel. Report Submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation above normal, water 82 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on topwater baits at 2-6 ft. early morning and late evening and on plastic baits and jig combo's during the day along the weed, rock and woody shorelines. Crappie fair on minnows at 8 ft. in the old creek channels with woody or brush pile structure. White bass slow on shad imitation lures at 6-8 ft. in the lower end of the lake. Blue and flathead catfish good on fresh cut and live bait at 3-6 ft. fishing the rocky areas around the lake. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis: Elevation 1 ft. above normal and slightly murky. Bass good on plastics off points and on spinnerbaits in grass beds. White bass fair trolling islands. Catfish excellent on jugs and trotlines with shrimp and cut shad. Flathead catfish fair on juglines with live bait. Crappie excellent on live minnows at 10 ft. from the bottom under bridges and on jigs around timber. Walleye fair on plugs trolling the islands. Report submitted by Alan Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation is normal, water temperature 78 and mostly clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on spinnerbaits and plastic baits around riprap. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait, sassy shad and some on surface baits late in the afternoon from Catfish Bay south. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on worms, cut shad and live bait in the Red River arm. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around fish attractors. Sunfish very good on worms near the fishing docks and riprap. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 2 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastics and spinnerbaits. Crappie good on minnows, small spinnerbaits and jigs. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad and liver. Flathead catfish excellent on live sunfish in the upper Poteau River . Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation is 3 ft. below normal and dropping, Striped bass hybrids being caught when trolling. Walleyes are starting to bite again. Noodlers have caught a few large catfish. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park.

Foss Lake: Elevation 1 ft. above normal with 3 gates open, water 70's and murky above the buoy line and mostly clear near the dam. Striped bass hybrids good on live bait while drifting. Walleye good with live bait. Crappie fair to good. Bass fair on spinnerbaits. Catfish good on trotlines and from bank. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Waurika: Elevation normal, water 77 and murky. Channel and blue catfish good on juglines. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County

Thunderstorms continue to march through Grant county plaguing the 2008 wheat harvest. Last night storm left 0.52 inches of rain and wind gusts recorded by Mesonet at 41 mph.

County and City Crews Clear Tree Debris

Friday and Monday, Grant county districts helped the city of Medford employees clear streets and yards of tree debris after high straight line-winds reported to 70 mph battered Medford during last week.

Medford was also with out electrical power when yet another severe thunderstorm passed through Grant County Sunday night. Leaving several more trees damaged in the city.

OG&E Sets New Highline Pole

OG&E crew prepare to install a new power-line pole on Oklahoma 11 in front of the Cardinal Football field Monday morning at 10:30.

After a severe thunderstorm battered Medford with Medonet recording a wind speed at 51 mph and leaving most of Medford without electrical power for a short time Sunday night.

Oil Well Tank Battery Fire East of Wakita

Heavy thunderstorms and lighting strikes continue to plague Grant county Monday afternoon with the report of an oil well tank battery fire northwest of Red Hill Road from Oklahoma 11 with Wakita and Medford fire units responding.

According to Mesonet Medford has received 2.55 inches of rain in the last 24 hours. The 2008 Wheat harvest is still being plagued with soggy fields.
FISHING REPORT FOR JUNE 11, 2008

CENTRAL

Arcadia: Elevation 1 ft. above normal and rising, water 78. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits at 3 ft. along north rocky banks in the morning and mid-day. Channel catfish fair to good on worms and cut baits at 5-10 ft. along north banks in the morning. Crappie good. Report submitted by Linnie Mason, gate attendant.

Thunderbird: Elevation normal and clear. White bass good trolling off points with medium-diving crankbaits. Saugeye good on sassy shad, jigs and medium diving crankbaits at 6-8 ft. early and late day off points and humps. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation above normal, water muddy. Largemouth bass fair on plastics. Channel catfish slow. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Birch: Elevation 1 ft. above normal. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Channel catfish good on cut shad. White bass and hybrid striped bass fair drifting live shad in the main body8 of the lake and trolling silver rattletraps. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation normal, water 78 and muddy. Crappie fair on jigs at 8-12 ft. Catfish good on cut bait and punch bait. Hybrid striped bass fair trolling with crankbaits. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Chandler: Elevation above normal, water muddy. Largemouth bass fair on plastics. Channel catfish slow. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Copan: Elevation 10 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie good on minnow and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Channel and blue catfish good on rod and reel, juglines with shad, stinkbait and worms. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Eucha: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 70 and muddy. Heavy rains and muddy conditions have slowed fishing. Some catfish are being caught on juglines using cut shad. Bluegill active on crickets and worms. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 8 1/2 ft. above normal, water 74 and murky. White bass above the dam good on thin rooster tails and jigs around bridges and rock structure. White bass good below the dam on jigs and minnows. Catfish good on worms, shrimp, cut baits and chicken livers around rocky outcrops and rock formations. Paddlefish snagging good. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: Upper end: Elevation rising, water 80 and muddy in Elk River and murky in Honey Creek. Largemouth bass excellent on everything at 1-10 ft. around ledges, points and banks. White bass very good on slabs, spoons, minnows and small spinnerbaits. Catfish excellent on worms, shad and shrimp around rocks and shoreline. Crappie fair to good on minnows at 5-7 ft. around brush piles and docks. Bluegill very good on minnows and worms. Paddlefish very slow. Report submitted by Sam Williams, Grand Lake Sports Center .

Grand: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 76-81, above Sailboat Bridge is muddy, from Sailboat Bridge to Horse Creek the water is dirty and Horse Creek to the dam it is lightly stained. There is full generation and 6 small flood gates are open. Bass good on crankbaits and drop baits. The Carolina-rig is doing well, but if that water gets up in the bushes and willows the rig bit could slow down. The topwater bite is starting to come on as well, along with buzzbaits. Crappie slow but showing some improvement, around dock brush and off the bridge piers, chartreuse, black, or red colored jigs. Catfish are moving into the rocks and around the schooling gar, being caught on shrimp and worms. The Flatheads are in the holes, and the noodlers are having a blast! Juggers are catching good numbers on shad all over the lake. White bass in the lake have moved out and are biting the jigging spoons. They are starting to surface feed in parts of Horse Creek and Elk River and small crankbaits and Firecracker grubs are producing the best. Report submitted by Littlefield’s Sporting Goods & Greg Lamb’s Guide Service.

Hudson: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on spinnerbaits. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad and worms. Crappie fair on minnows. Paddlefish snagging fair in the upper part of the lake. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Rogers and Mayes Counties .

Hulah: Elevation 14 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Channel catfish are good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 17 ft. above normal, water muddy. Channel and blue catfish good on stinkbaits, worms and cut shad at Traders Bend. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Keystone: Elevation 12 ft. above normal and rising, water muddy. Largemouth bass fair on plastics and spinnerbaits at 3-8 ft. in backs of coves and creeks. Smallmouth bass slow on crankbaits, jigs and chunkbaits at 6-12 ft. around points. Spotted bass slow on chrome crankbaits at 5-10 ft. around bluffs. White bass fair on minnows and jigs at 3-6 ft. below the dam. Striped bass fair on bucktails and live shad at 3-6 ft. below the dam. Channel catfish good on worms at 5-10 ft. in creeks and coves. Blue catfish good on cut shad at 6-12 ft. in coves and below the dam. Flathead catfish good on large shiners and live shad at 6-12 ft. around bluffs and below the dam. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 6-12 ft. in creeks and below the dam. Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Oologah: Elevation 8 ft. above normal, water mid-70's and muddy. Crappie fair on minnows at 5-8 ft. along the Winganon Bridge . White bass fair trolling shad colored crankbaits at 10-15 ft. Channel catfish fair on worms and dough baits around flooded willows and in flooded fields. White bass and crappie fair on jigs below the dam. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 7 ft. above normal, water muddy. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits or spinnerbaits in the lower end. Striped bass hybrids good on live shad in deep water at 10-15 ft. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 6-10 ft. around bridge riprap. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Spavinaw: Elevation 2 1/2 ft. above normal, water 77 and murky. Catfish fair on juglines using cut shad. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Tenkiller: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water 78 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits or sluggo-type baits. Catfish fair on windy points, shallow on cut baits. Sunfish good on gravel beds and in docks on night crawlers. Report by Monte Brooks Cookson Village Resort.

NORHTWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Channel catfish excellent on live bait and stinkbait along the dam. Walleye and striped bass hybrids good drifting small live sunfish and slabs. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation normal, water 78-80 and clear to stain in upper creeks. Crappie good on minnows and jigs on brush piles. White bass being caught on jigs and spoons at 12-25 ft. Channel catfish good on baited holes. Bass fair to good using spinnerbaits, jigs and Carolina rigged lizards. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation above normal, water 80 and muddy. Bass fair on minnows and flies. Catfish fair to good on liver and worms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Water clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on soft plastics at 4-5 ft. Catfish being caught on juglines and trotlines with cut bait and shad. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around structure at the upper end and mouth of creeks. Walleye slowing but still being caught on fire tiger crankbaits and soft plastics around points and rocky ledges. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on plastics flipping the flooded timber. White bass good on jigs at 6-10 ft. along the riprap at bridges. Blue catfish good on worms and shad at 3-6 ft. in rocky areas. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 6-20 ft. under bridges. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation normal water 72. Largemouth bass fair on plastics and spinnerbaits, crappie fair on minnows in brush piles. Catfish fair on trotlines baited with green sunfish and goldfish. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 80 and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic worms at 4-6 ft. in weed beds. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits at 8-10 ft. along points. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

Lower Mountain Fork River: Trout good in all three zones. Zones 2 and 3 have been really good for those anglers who really know how to fish for trout. Trout are being caught on mayflies, caddis and midges. Zones 2 and 3 have been especially good using various streamers. Otherwise most all of the beadhead nymphs of proper size should work for you. Report submitted by Beavers Bend Fly Shop.

McGee Creek: Elevation normal, water 72. Water clear south end and murky in upper McGee Creek arm. Crappie fair to good on jigs or minnows at 8-12 ft. around cedar brush. Bass fair on soft plastics at 8-15 ft. off rocky points. Channel catfish fair on natural or prepared baits near the riprap on the dike. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Elevation normal, water 80 and clear. Largemouth bass and smallmouth bass good. White bass being caught on minnows, jigs and crankbaits trolling early and late. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits, minnows, liver and shrimp. Walleye good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation normal and murky. Bass fair on plastic worms at 4-8 ft. Crappie fair on jigs. Channel catfish good on night crawlers around the lake as well as the spillway. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation below normal, water 80 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on topwater baits early and late, plastic baits during mid-day, fishing the weed and woody shorelines. Crappie fair at 8-10 ft. using minnows fishing the edge of the old creek channels. White bass fair at 6-8 ft. fishing shad imitation lures in the Applegate cove and Cowlington Point areas. Blue catfish and flathead catfish good at 3-6 ft. using fresh cut bait and live bait fishing the rocky shore lines. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Elevation 1 ft. above normal and slightly murky. Bass good on spinnerbaits, off points on plastics and in grass beds on spinners. White bass fair trolling islands. Catfish excellent on jugs and trotlines with shrimp and cut shad. Flathead catfish fair on jugs baited with live bait. Crappie excellent on live minnows at 10 ft. from the bottom under bridges and around timber on jigs. Walleye fair on plugs trolling the islands. Report submitted by Alan Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation normal, water 75 and clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on spinnerbaits and deep diving crankbaits in the coves. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait, sassy shad and some are starting to be on the surface near the islands. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on cut baits and worms on the Washita and Red river arms. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs around fish attractors and underwater brush. Sunfish good on worms around the fishing docks. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastics and spinnerbaits. Crappie good on minnows, small spinnerbaits and jigs. Channel and blue catfish good cut shad and liver. Flathead catfish excellent on live sunfish. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Ft. Cobb: Elevation 1 1/4 ft. above normal. Catfish fair on cut baits. Saugeye fair drifting night crawlers. Striped bass hybrids slow to fair on shad. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County .

Waurika: Elevation normal, water 70 and murky. Blue catfish good on cut and whole shad on jugs. Channel catfish good on punchbait and cut shad with rod and reel. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County .

Frankie Robbins Announces his Candidacy for the US House of Representatives

Today, I announce that I am running for the U.S. House of Representatives in the 3rd Congressional District of Oklahoma. I do so with humility and sincerity.

I am proud to be kicking off my campaign in my hometown of Medford. In front of neighbors, high school classmates, and friends who know me best. Know from whence I came and many who have shaped and influenced my life.

There are many people who have shaped my life – none greater than my parents with the unconditional love of my mother; and my dad’s determination to never give up, to never quit despite having to use crutches to get around due to the ravages of arthritis. To this day, his personal fortitude is my role model for perseverance and hard work.

I am proud of my heritage – my Grandfather – Charlie S. Robbins – who made the land run in 1893 and whose name is inscribed in the memorial to the homesteaders and early settlers – the memorial just east of us.

I am thankful for the American Legion sponsoring Boy’s State. I have had a passion for public service ever since I attended Oklahoma Boys State in 1963 as well as the inspiration of President John F. Kennedy.

I am thankful to Don Schuneman, my high school principle, for a lesson in leadership.

The day after I was elected Student Council President at the end of my junior year; I had watched as two of my classmates had de-pants an 8th grader. Before applying one swat with the paddle, Mr. Schuneman told me a true leader would speak up and stop a wrong. The lesson I took from that was: leaders should be held accountable; leaders should take action “to do the right thing”; and the biggest impression that paddle made – humility, a big dose of humble pie!

I am standing here today because of Roland Hula, my high school classmate and now Grant County Sheriff. I was back for our 40th high school reunion in 2004. Roland was running for sheriff. I was impressed by his “giving back to his community”. Roland had retired from the Oklahoma Highway Patrol and had plenty to keep him busy with farming his dad’s land. So, he didn’t need the extra hours of work or the money; it was purely his desire to “make a difference”; to clean up the meth labs; and maintain the quality of life for the citizens of Grant County.

Roland’s example caused me to decide to retire early, while I was still in good health, come home to Medford, and give back to my community, my state, and my nation.

I am thankful that this community has given me a strong foundation. I’m grateful for the good education I received in the Medford Public Schools and at Oklahoma State University. Education was the key that opened a world of opportunities for me.

However, I am most thankful that my teachers instilled in my classmates and I that we could be anything, do anything that we put our mind to do – that we truly had an “equal opportunity”.

Why I’m running:

I’m running because I care deeply about my country. I have a profound sense of personal responsibility to give back to my country, my state, and my community; and I aspire to “make a difference” – to leave our children, grand-children and future generations a better, stronger nation than what we inherited from our mothers and fathers.

I am committed to “doing the right thing” for our country. I’m committed to working with Republicans, Democrats, and independents to unite our country; to bridge the red/blue divide and to move this country forward in a positive and robust way.

There is too much division and polarization. We must come together and find common ground. Politicians and commentators use labels like “liberal”, “religious right”, “conservative” to divide us. They are being extremely lazy and divisive. They think that with the right label it is the end of the discussion, that we should close our minds, stop listening, and pretend only “our side” has all the answers and the only answers

I know I don’t have all the answers. That’s why I will listen to all sides, and work with all sides to find the best solutions for all Americans.

We all have had enough of the partisan bickering, enough of the nonsense, enough of the spin, and enough of putting political positioning and getting re-elected over doing what is best for America. There are too many issues that need action NOW. We need bold new leadership in Congress that is positive, optimistic, and has a “CAN-DO” attitude to tackle the big issues confronting America today.

I’m a realist and an optimist. I’m a realist in that I know we have much work to do to get America Back on Track and headed in the right direction. But, I’m optimistic because I know it can be done if we all come together and work together for what is best for our country and the world we live in. I have the vision for the future and the can-do attitude to Get America Back on Track.

One attribute that makes me highly qualified to run for office is that I am not a professional politician; and I’m not going to become a professional politician. I have the age and life experiences that I know I can keep my feet planted solidly in this good ol’ Oklahoma red dirt where I grew up. I will be the same trustworthy, honest, and straightforward man after I’m elected as I am today! You can count on that!

Leadership is about choices and priorities. For too long, Congress has taken no action; done nothing on the tough issues of the day. That must CHANGE! That is why it is time for CHANGE! It is time to tackle the tough issues. Issues like healthcare, supporting our veterans, education, war on terrorism, infrastructure, immigration, Social Security/Medicare, rural economic development – ALL need action NOW.

However, there are two issues that must be a priority.

Energy Independence and Climate Change

“We, as a nation, face two huge challenges. They are: our dependence on foreign oil; and the urgency of addressing climate change.”

“Today, they are the greatest threats to our national security, our economy, our way of life, and our place as the greatest nation on earth. And, they are threats, that if not addressed now, that will have serious consequences for decades to come.”

“We have to tackle these key threats with a national unity and purpose not seen since World War II. We must seek energy independence with a sense of utmost necessity, and for our economic security it is essential that we take the lead in addressing climate change. Both issues are so interconnected that they must be incorporated into one all encompassing national strategic energy plan.”

“I know I can provide the bold and visionary leadership we need in Congress. I know that working together, united in purpose, and taking action now; Americans CAN and Americans WILL prevail and make a difference for generations to come.”

The many other tough issues must be confronted too. But, if we don’t tackle energy independence and climate change NOW, our ability to effectively address the other issues for the long term will be severely limited and our children’s future less promising.

“I’m ready to lead! And, I’m ready to take action! I’m ready to Get America Back on Track!”

Where I am today:

I know I don’t have all the answers. And, I realize that in order to arrive at the best solution it is important to listen to all sides and to work together in a collaborative manner. But, I know how to “separate the wheat for the chaff”. I have the common sense and the intellect to recognize political “spin” or biased “facts” when I hear them.

It is most important that I listen to you! Too often in campaigns, it is the candidate who does all the talking. I will listen to you because I need to learn from you. I need to hear your thoughts, ideas, issues, and aspirations.

Because I am retired, I can devote my full time and energy to representing the people of Oklahoma. I will deem it an honor and a privilege.

That much repeated phrase: “United we stand; Divided we fall” is as true today as ever. I will stand up for you. You can count on me to stand up for what is right for America.

And, you can count on me to work to unite us as Americans.

But, YOU have a very important responsibility too! Last week, I had the privilege to speak to the summer school students (grades 1-6) on the subject of elections and their responsibility as citizens when they become eligible to vote. We talked about what it means that our country is a Republic.

We said the pledge of allegiance earlier – that phrase “and to the Republic for which it stands” is very important related to your role and responsibility as citizens and voters to effect change. A Republic is: A state or nation in which the supreme power rests in all the citizens entitled to vote -- THAT IS YOU! YOU have the power to effect change in your government. To complete the definition of a Republic: A Republic is: “A state or nation in which the supreme power rests in all the citizens entitled to vote -- “And is exercised by representatives elected by the citizens & responsible to the citizens” – THAT IS ME!

I will be responsible to you. I want you to hold me accountable!

Together, we will Get America Back on Track. America’s best days are still ahead of us!

The Time is NOW

It is time for Change

It is time to tackle the tough issues

It is time for Real Leadership for Oklahoma

It is time to “GET AMERICA BACK ON TRACK”!!

I humbly and respectfully ask for our support and your vote!

In case anyone wants to know, or asks you. The city has and is fogging this year in fact they or shall I say he {Heath Cripe) was out in full force Friday evening fogging his little heart out on the north side of the city. Do not know how far he or wide his fogging took him but let us hope far enough to give the little biting demons a run for there lives…

A fatality collision occurred at 1300 hours on 06/06/2008, .7 miles west of

SH74 on SH11 in Grant County.

Vehicle one - 2004 Chevrolet pickup driven by Gloria J. Jamieson, WF, 68

yoa, address Deer Creek,

Oklahoma. Driver expired at the scene with head and trunk internal. Body

was taken to Robertson Funeral Home in Blackwell, Oklahoma. Ejected approx

20' from vehicle.

No passengers

What Happened: Vehicle one was east bound on SH11 for unknown reason,

vehicle ran off roadway on the right side, over corrected back on roadway.

Vehicle lost control went into broadslide rolling 1 1/4 times coming to

rest on the

drivers side.

Seatbelts.........equipped not in use

Weather...........clouds present

Roadway.........dry

Pinned..............none

Ejected.............see narrative

Condition of Driver............01 apparently normal

Cause of Collision.............88 other unknown

A soggy Wheat harvest 2008 is getting off to a sloppy start. Since Tuesday according to Mesonet we have received 4.40 inches of rainfall. Heavy rains and high winds are still plaguing Grant County at 9 p.m. Thursday evening with this writting.

The full moon is on June 18 so hopefully drying weather will be in the forecast for the rest of June.

US64 is closed to thru traffic from SH132 in Grant co (Nash) to SH38 in

Alfalfa Co (Jet)

due to power poles and lines in the highway.

Grant Co ODOT has closed US 81-north bound at Pond Creek to KS line.

Water over highway between Pond Creek and Medford and between

Medford and State line. Water is also reported on HWY 74 north of Lamont but 74 is not closed to traffic.

One of Medford’s landmarks fell this morning, June 5th, 2008. The old Cottonwood that stood so strong for what some say well over a hundred years on the small creek bed on South 6th Street.

Severe thunderstorms ripped through Grant county Tuesday evening June 3rd leaving a path of down power lines and trees starting in western parts of the county.

The path of damage was in an area 4 miles north of Hwy 11 and starting at Hwy. 132 then going east through Wakita. Several miles of Electric lines were down, trees down and some moderate house damage occurred. One Grant county resident was transported to the Community Health Center in Wakita due to needing an Oxygen Concentrator because of electric outage at his home. CHC was on a generator power till eclectic was restored in Wakita.

The town of Wakita was the hardest hit; they had several power lines and trees down and were still out of electricity the next morning.

No injuries were reported from the storm and it seems that most of the damage was caused by straight line winds.

Departments responding the help with the emergency clean up in the western part of the county were Hawley, Nash, Wakita & Manchester.

Mike and Traci Hancock residents at 119 E Sunset Dr in Medford is pictured with a large portions of the tree in their front yard blocking the front entrance to their home after an estimated 65 to 70 mph wind gust riped through Medford Tuesday evening.

FISHING REPORT FOR JUNE 4, 2008

CENTRAL

Arcadia: Largemouth bass slow. Channel catfish good on cut bait and liver at rocky points. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at the heated fishing dock. Report submitted by Mark Murray, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Arcadia: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water semi-muddy. Largemouth bass fair to good on worms in shallows and north points in the mornings. Channel catfish good to excellent on shad and shrimp at 5-10 ft. around north points in mornings and evenings. Crappie excellent on jigs and minnows at 5 ft. around north docks in the mornings. Bluegill fair to good on worms at 5-10 ft. around north points in the mornings. Report submitted by Linnie Mason, gate attendant.

Hefner: Elevation normal, water 75. Smallmouth bass good on crankbaits. White bass good. Channel catfish good on cut shad. Crappie excellent on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Overholser: Elevation normal, water 76 and murky. White bass good on 2 inch. chartreuse jigs. Striped bass hybrids good on crankbaits. Channel catfish good on cut shad. Bluegill good on worms. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Thunderbird: Elevation 1 1/3 ft. above normal and murky. Saugeye good on jigs, sassy shad and medium-diving crankbaits off windy points early and late day. Crappie slowing down now to fair on minnows on structure at 3-6 ft. White bass good on jigs, minnows and medium-diving crankbaits trolling or casting off points and humps. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation normal and muddy. Bass good on spinnerbaits and plastics. White bass good on jigs and minnows. Catfish slow. Crappie good on jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Birch: Elevation 1 ft. above normal with no gate changes. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-15 ft. near submerged structure. Channel catfish are good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation normal, water 78 and muddy. Crappie fair on jigs at 8-12 ft. Catfish good on cut bait and punchbait. Striped bass hybrids fair trolling with crankbaits. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Chandler: Elevation normal and murky. Bass fair on spinnerbaits and plastics. Catfish slow. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Copan: Elevation 10 ft. above normal, water murky. One low flow valve is open at 60% and tainter gates are open 1/2 ft. Crappie good on minnow and jigs at 10-15 ft. near submerged structure. Channel catfish good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Eucha: Elevation slightly above normal water 78 and murky. Bluegill excellent on crickets and worms. Catfish fair on juglines using cut shad. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows at 6-8 ft. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 5 1/2 ft. above normal and rising, water 73 and murky. Large mouth bass fair to good on spinnerbaits and jerk baits in flooded brush and grass. White bass good on rattletraps, spinnerbaits, and rooster tails trolling. Catfish good on cut chicken livers in the mud flats, off rocky points and around bridges and along riprap on shrimp. Crappie good on minnows at 10-15 ft. around structure. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic worms in grass beds. Catfish good on stinkbaits and cut baits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around fishing dock and brush. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hudson: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 72. White bass good on minnows and twister grubs in the upper end. Channel catfish good on cut shad and worms. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs. Paddlefish fair in the upper end. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Mayes County .

Hulah: Elevation 11 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Channel catfish good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 4 ft. above normal and rising, water muddy. Channel and blue catfish good on rod and reel, juglines and trolling with shad, stinkbait and worms from Coon Creek north to the state line in the Arkansas River. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Oologah: Elevation 10 ft. above normal, water 70 and muddy. Crappie fair on minnows along the Winganon Bridge at 5-8 ft. White bass fair trolling shad colored crankbaits at 10-15 ft. Channel catfish fair on worms and dough baits around flooded willows and in flooded fields. White bass and crappie also fair on jigs below the dam. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water mid-70's and muddy. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits or spinnerbaits in the lower end. Striped bass hybrids good on live shad at 10-15 ft. in deep water. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 6-10 ft. in riprap around bridges. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on live shad and slabs. Catfish fair on live bait and cut bait off Hwy 15. Crappie good on minnows off Hwy 177. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Spavinaw: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 78 and murky. Bluegill excellent on crickets and worms. Catfish fair on juglines using cut shad. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around the dam area. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Tenkiller: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water 78 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits in shallow water. Crappie slow some action in shallow water on minnows or jigs. Catfish fair on windy points on worms, shad or minnows. Report by Monte Brooks Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits in creek channels. Catfish good on cut baits, stinkbaits and sunfish on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around bridges and brush. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Channel catfish good on live bait and stinkbait along dam. Walleye good trolling shallow running crankbaits in the upper end of lake. White bass and striped bass hybrids good on slabs and live sunfish near submerged islands. Crappie fair in shallows on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

Ft. Supply: Elevation normal, water clear. Crappie good on minnows and jigs along the jetties in the shallows. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation normal, water 77-79 and stained. Crappie good on brush piles at 18-24 ft. White bass are off most points at 5-18 ft. Bass fair to good off points on topwater lures early, Texas-rigged blue fleck worms, spinnerbaits good up on banks. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 80 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on minnows and flies. Catfish fair on stinkbaits, worms and liver. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Water clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on soft plastics at 4-5 ft. Catfish being caught on juglines and trotlines with cut bait and shad. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around structure at the upper end and mouth of creeks. Walleye slowing but still being caught on fire tiger crankbaits and soft plastics around points and rocky ledges. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 2 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair on plastics flipping flooded brush. White bass good on jigs along riprap under bridges. Blue catfish good around rocky areas. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 8-12 ft. under bridges and around brush. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation normal, water 72. Crappie and bass good on minnows and small spinnerbaits around brush. Catfish fair on cut bait and sunfish. Fishing in the tailwater good. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 79 and clear. Largemouth bass excellent on plastic worms at 3-6 ft. in weed beds. Channel catfish good on shad and stinkbaits at 5-8 ft. in coves. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

Lower Mountain Fork River: Fishing good in all three zones on small midge patterns, various nymphs, wooly buggers, and several brightly colored streamers. Not much action on dry flies yet, but I would surely try an ant pattern when the weather is breezy. Report submitted by Beavers Bend Fly Shop.

McGee Creek: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water 74 and clear. Largemouth bass fair to good on plastic craws and crawfish colored crankbaits at 4-5 ft. right against the bank. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Elevation normal, water 80 and clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good. White bass being caught on minnows, jigs and crankbaits trolling early and late. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits, minnows, liver and shrimp. Walleye good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation normal and murky. Bass good on soft plastics when jigged around flooded timber at 4-8 ft. Crappie good on jigs and minnows. Channel catfish good on night crawlers around the lake as well as the spillway. Flathead catfish are being caught on minnows at the spillway. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water 76 and murky. Largemouth bass good on plastics and spinnerbaits at 2-6 ft. fishing the weed, rock and woody shorelines. Crappie fair on minnows at 5-8 ft. fishing the deeper water just off the spawning areas. White bass fair at 6-8 ft trolling crankbaits and jigs fishing in the Applegate Cove and Short Mountain areas. Blue and flathead catfish good on fresh cut bait and live bait at 3-10 ft. fishing the rocky shorelines. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Elevation 1 ft. above normal and slightly murky. Bass good on spinners, off points in plastics and in grass beds on spinners. White bass fair trolling islands. Catfish excellent on shrimp and cut shad on jugs and trotlines. Flathead catfish fair on jugs baited with live bait. Crappie excellent on live minnows at 10 ft. from the bottom under bridges and around timber on jigs. Walleye fair on plugs trolling the islands. Report submitted by Alan Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation normal, water 74 and mostly clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on live bait and spinnerbaits in the coves. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait and sassy shad from the Hwy 70 Bridge south. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on worms, live bait and cut baits from the hwy 70 bridge north. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs around the fish attractors and fishing docks. Sunfish good on worms around the fishing docks. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 2 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits. Crappie good with minnows and jigs. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad and liver. Flathead catfish excellent on sunfish. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal and murky. Crappie fair to good on minnows at Ralph's Resort at boat ramp and railroad bridge. Catfish good on juglines. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County

Foss: Elevation normal, water 70 and clear. Gates open. Striped bass hybrids fair on light blue hot and tots trolling in channel near buoy line. Walleye good on live bait. White bass good. Catfish fair. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: Elevation 1 ft. above normal and falling. Crappie slow on jigs and minnows. Catfish slow to fair on jugs and cut baits. Saugeye slow to fair drifting night crawlers. Striped bass hybrids slow to fair on shad. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County .

Lawtonka: Elevation above normal and clear. Crappie fair at dam on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Tom Steed: Elevation near normal and fairly clear. Striped bass hybrids good on sassy shad and cut shad in deep water. Blue catfish good on live bait and trotlines. Report submitted by Robin Pugh, game warden stationed in Tillman County .

Waurika: Elevation normal, water 70 and murky. Blue catfish good on cut and whole shad on jugs. Channel catfish good on punch and cut shad on rod and reel. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County .

An EMT training day held Saturday morning at the Medford airport.

Matt Miller, instructor for the EMT-Basic class that began February 18 and officially ended Saturday May 31.

Students attending the class are Chris Ferrell, Mike Glenn, Angela Scott and Jim Shepherd who was unable to attend Saturday’s class. All four students successfully passed the course.

“The in-house training courses are necessary in order for the City of Medford Emergency Medical Service to address the challenges of staffing their ambulance, “said Matt Miller, EMT-Paramedic and Training Officer for Medford. “All across the state ambulance services are struggling to survive and keep their ambulances staffed. Staffing is one of the biggest issues facing EMS providers,” said Miller. “We are very fortunate to live in a town with a city management so dedicated to maintaining its ambulance service. But we could still use the help of other citizens.” said Miller

Anyone that is interested in becoming an EMT with Medford EMS should contact the city offices in regards to availability of EMT classes here in Medford. The citizens should also know that EMS is much more than a service that just drives people to the hospital, it is a service that actually treats and stabilizes critically ill and injured people. Being part of your local EMS team is rewarding and fun and you could truly make a difference in someones life.

Those assisting with making the training day possible are Tom Woodson and Greg Herrera with Medford Fire, Alan Juhl with Medford EMS, Amy York and Joleen Corr with Miller EMS. The helicopter service that flew in was Air Evac Life team out of Cushing, Oklahoma. Contributing agencies were Medford EMS, Medford Fire Department, Miller EMS, and Air Evac Life team. In addition, the City of Medford allowed the use of the airport grounds for the training. Chris Ferrell donated the vehicle used.

Kayla and Trevor Scott (son and daughter of Angela Scott) participated in the training as well acting as patients.

Shown in the picture are Medford EMS personal loading a "Mock" accident victim into Air Evac Life team Helicopter out of Cushing, Oklahoma.

A Nash resident William Jay Trumbo, 43, 308 S. Arizona, has registered with the Grant County Sheriff’s Office, as a convicted sex offender.

According to the Oklahoma Sex Offender Registry his felony second degree rape occurred in 1993 in LaGrande, Oregon.

“As of April 3 Trumbo’s registration form was completed at The Grant County Sheriff’s Office and there are no subsequent notices from him or DOC regarding a change of address.” stated Grant County Sheriff Roland Hula.”

Execution Date Set for Kevin Young

The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals today set July 22 as the execution date for Oklahoma County death row inmate Kevin Young.

Young was sentenced to death for the May 1996 murder of 56-year-old Joseph Sutton in Oklahoma City.

Currently, Oklahoma County inmate Terry Lyn Short is scheduled to be executed June 17 for the 1995 murder of 22-year-old Ken Yamamoto in Oklahoma City.

Cases continued to the July 17, 2008 Board meeting:

Brian K. Rich, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging false statements and

admission to theft

Paul A. Howard, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging sexual misconduct

David R. Mitchell, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging sexual misconduct

Dhyia Ibrahim Al Qutshan, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging false statements

and sexual misconduct

Millard L. Henry, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging sexual misconduct

Dana D. Stull, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging substance abuse; violation of

probation

Case dismissed:

Herbert W. Lindley, M.D.

Selman Bat Watch provides unique glimpse of wildlife

Come see one million bats spiral out of their roost, flying over your head and into the nighttime sky at a Selman Bat Watch. The nightly exodus of bats attracts visitors to the Selman Bat Cave near Freedom where the state’s only Mexican free-tailed bat viewing occurs.

The Bat Watches will be held on the last three weekends in July and the first weekend in August. Visitors must pre-register in order to attend. You can download the registration form beginning June 2nd at wildlifedepartment.com.

The Department purchased the area around the bat cave in 1996 because of its ecological importance to the Mexican free-tailed bat. According to Melynda Hickman, wildlife diversity biologist for the Wildlife Department, the cave is important because it is one of only five major sites in Oklahoma that is used by females to raise their young.

Hickman says the bats provide a great service: free pest control. The bats spend daylight hours inside the cave. But most of the action is after sunset.

“They fly about the countryside hunting insects from dusk until dawn,” Hickman said, “We estimate they eat about 10 tons (20,000 pounds) of insects, moths and beetles every night.”

The bats’ evening emergence is the highlight of a Bat Watch, but there’s more to the evening than simply watching bats. There’s also learning and exploring. Buses take visitors to the Selman Bat Cave Wildlife Management Area, usually closed to the public. Visitors learn facts about bats and the prairie community. There is also an optional nature hike before the bats emerge. On Friday and Saturday evenings, staff and telescopes from the University of Central Oklahoma ’s Selman Living Laboratory will be at the observatory to assist stargazers.

The Bat Watches benefit the local economy by drawing tourists from a multi-state region into Oklahoma . Hickman feels Oklahomans are lucky to have the bats here.

“It is exciting to offer this rare opportunity to get close to wild bats and to share their importance to our environment and economy,” Hickman said.

The event is limited to 75 people each night, and registration is required. The cost is $10 for adults and $5 for youth aged 12 and younger. For more information, call 405-424-0099 or log on to wildlifedepartment.com.

Oklahoma Aquarium turns five years old

The Oklahoma Aquarium in Jenks turns five years old this month, and in that time has enjoyed successful growth while leaving its mark on Oklahoma.

The Oklahoma Aquarium houses over 200 exhibits consisting of both salt and freshwater fish.

“People need to come out and see the Aquarium,” said Colin Berg, education supervisor for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. “The exhibits are awesome, and they even have record fish on site, like the state record blue catfish that you can see up close. This really is a great partnership.”

Over the last five years, the Oklahoma Aquarium has welcomed about 2 million visitors, and approximately 1/3 of its guests come from out of state. Additionally, the Aquarium has led to an estimated $100 million in tourism for Oklahoma and has educated more than 100,000 pre-K to graduate level students through organized field trips, internships and other structured programs.

The Wildlife Department is proud to be a part of the Oklahoma Aquarium’s success. Along with maintaining an office branch at the Jenks-based Aquarium, the Department gets involved by holding aquatic education clinics at the site. Additionally, the Hayes Family Ozark Streams exhibit at the Aquarium was partially funded through the Oklahoma Sport Fish Restoration Program.

Visitors to the Oklahoma Aquarium can learn about the biodiversity and adaptation of many different species. Learning is only half the fun, though, as the Oklahoma Aquarium holds within it some very special visual opportunities.

The Hayes Family Ozark Streams exhibit features Oklahoma fish such as smallmouth bass and sunfish as well as the aquarium’s first mammals, including beavers, raccoons and river otters. The unique design of the exhibit allows guests to come nose to nose with the animals, separated only by glass. Hand-carved concrete mimics the rocky cliffs of northeastern Oklahoma at the foot of the Ozarks, and a crashing waterfall adds to the ambience. Even the lighting and temperature contribute to the environment. This exhibit gives visitors to the already popular Oklahoma Aquarium a chance to learn about stream ecology and the importance of protecting Oklahoma ’s native scenic waters. However, the Ozark Streams exhibit is not the only reason to visit the Oklahoma Aquarium. Other exhibits include the Karl and Beverly White Fishing and Tackle Museum, which showcases antique tackle and fishing gear; the Fishes of Oklahoma exhibit, offering the opportunity to see a state record blue catfish, seven-foot-long gars and an alligator snapping turtle that is more than 120 years old,; and the Ray & Robin Siegfried Families Shark Adventure, which has a walk-through tunnel and dome that allows you to see the largest bull sharks in captivity swimming alongside you and even right over your head.

Visitors to the Oklahoma Aquarium who present a current Oklahoma hunting or fishing license upon arrival receive $2 off admission.

For additional information about the Oklahoma Aquarium and how you can plan your visit, log on to okaquarium.org or call (918) 296-3474.

Need A Ride?

• Rural Transit Alternative

Need to get to the doctor in Enid and your car broke down? Have to catch a plane in Oklahoma City and no way to get there?

There is an alternative transportation solution in northwestern Oklahoma that is available to any one going just about anywhere.

There's a secret that most folks in rural Oklahoma should know. That secret is that there is a very valuable service available for those who are in need of critical transportation and don't have it. It's the Cherokee Strip Transit service.

Based in Garber, the service offers transportation to individuals to just about anywhere they want to go. Started in 1991, the system uses mini vans, both standard and wheelchair accessible passenger vans to transport passengers who don't have the ability or access to provide their own transportation by auto or from family and friends.

According to Rita Kroll, CST's director, the service's fares are based on mileage. Usually passengers should make their request three-days in advance so the transportation can be planned and scheduled as efficiently as possible.

“We provide service to any one regardless of age. We take them to doctors' appointments, the grocery store or any where they need to go,” Kroll stated.

Some fee examples are Cherokee to Alva $20; Alva to Oklahoma City $90; Alva to Enid $50 and Cherokee to Enid $30.

CST has drivers in Cherokee, Medford, Tonkawa, Kingfisher, Watonga and Perry. The main office is located in Garber. They are in the process of adding service in Blackwell. Kroll indicated that the best way to arrange for service is to call the main office in Garber between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. at 580-863-2279.

She indicated each city has a local number with an answering machine and each driver has a cell phone number. But since the drivers are on the road most of the day, they are not always able to respond to the calls.

For Cherokee the number is 580-596-2143 and cell number is 580-596-6139. The best hours to call are 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Cherokee Strip Transit is a part of Northern Oklahoma Development Agency (NODA), and it has contracts with several social agencies to provide services including Medicare, Medicate, TANF and others.

FISHING REPORT FOR MAY 28, 2008

CENTRAL

Arcadia: Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and plastics. Channel catfish good on cut baits around rocky points. Crappie good on minnows at 10-12 ft. Report submitted by Mark Murray, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Hefner: Elevation above normal, water 78 and murky. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits, White bass good on 2 in. grubs. Channel, blue and flathead catfish good on cut shad. Crappie good on minnows. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Overholser: Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on crankbaits. White bass good on 2 in. white grubs. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad. Crappie good on minnows. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Thunderbird: Elevation 2 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Saugeye good on jigs, sassy shad and medium-diving crankbaits off windy points early and late day. Crappie slowing down now to fair on minnows on structure at 3-6 ft. White bass good on jigs, minnows, and medium-diving crankbaits trolling or casting off points and humps. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation normal, water murky. Bass fair on spinnerbaits, crankbaits and plastics. Channel catfish fair on worms. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Birch: Elevation 1ft. above normal with no gate changes. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Channel catfish are good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation normal, water 77 and muddy. Crappie fair on jigs at 8-12 ft. Catfish good on cur bait and worms. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Chandler: Elevation normal, water muddy. Bass fair on spinnerbaits and plastics. Channel catfish slow. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Copan: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water murky. Crappie good on minnow and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Channel catfish are good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 72 and murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and salt crawls in flooding trees and grass. White bass good trolling rattletraps in open flats and bridges with structure above the dam; good to excellent on minnows and jigs below the dam. Catfish good on cut baits, worms and chicken livers along mud flats and rocky outcrops. Crappie fair on minnows suspended at 10 ft. above the dam; good on minnows below the dam. Paddlefish good below the dam. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: Elevation normal, water 70-76 and murky from Horse Creek to above Sailboat Bridge and stained from Horse Creek to the dam. Bass good on crankbaits, Carolina rigs, jigs, topwater lures baits and spinnerbaits off main lake and secondary points. Crappie slow with some being caught around brush piles and docks. Catfish being caught on jug mid-lake and Horse creek area on shad and gold fish. White bass are being caught in Horse Creek on jigging spoons at 12-25 ft. Report submitted by Littlefield’s Sporting Goods and Greg Lamb’s Guide Service.

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic worms in grass beds. Catfish fair on cut baits and stinkbaits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around the fishing dock and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hulah: Elevation 3ft. above normal with 2 low flow valves open at 28% and 3 sluice gates open 1/2 feet. Water is murky. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Channel catfish are good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 4 ft. above normal and rising, water muddy. Channel and blue catfish good on rod and reel, juglines and trolling with shad, stinkbait and worms from Coon Creek north to the state line in the Arkansas River. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Oologah: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water 70 and muddy. White bass fair trolling shad colored crankbaits at 10 ft. in Spencer and Blue Creeks. Channel catfish fair on worms along rocky banks at 5-10 ft. White bass fair on white and yellow jigs below the dam. Blue and channel catfish fair on shad below the dam. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water 70 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on white spinnerbaits and crankbaits at the lower end of the lake. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair drifting live shad in the main body of the lake. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs in riprap. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on live shad and slabs. Crappie good on minnows and jigs off Highways 177 and 15. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Webbers Falls: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits in creek channels and riprap. Catfish fair on cut baits. Crappie fair on minnows around bridges and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Crappie good on minnows and jigs in shallow water. Walleye good on shallow running crankbaits in the upper end of the lake. Channel catfish good along dam on stinkbait and live bait. White bass and striped bass hybrids good trolling crankbaits and drifting slabs. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

Ft. Supply: Elevation normal, water clear. Crappie good on jigs and minnows along the jetties in the shallows. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation normal, water 73 and clear. Crappie are biting at 18-24 ft. around brush piles. White bass are off most main lake points. Bass hitting lizards, spinnerbaits and crankbaits near shore. Channel catfish good in baited holes. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation slightly above normal, water 73 and murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on minnows and flies. Channel catfish fair to good on liver and worms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Water clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on soft plastics at 4-5 ft. Catfish being caught on juglines and trotlines with cut bait and shad. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around structure at the upper end and mouth of creeks. Walleye slowing but still being caught on fire tiger crankbaits and soft plastics around points and rocky ledges. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits flipping the brush. White bass good on jigs at 6-10 ft. in riprap at bridges. Blue catfish fair on shad at 6-10 ft. on flats. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 6-15 ft. in brush under the boat docks. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation normal and water 66. Largemouth bass and crappie good on minnows along the river channel and brush piles. Catfish fair to good on trotlines with cut shad and green sunfish for bait. Crappie and blue catfish good to very good in the tailwaters. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 79 and clear. Largemouth bass excellent on plastic worms at 3-6 ft. in weed beds. Channel catfish good on shad and stinkbaits at 5-8 ft. in coves. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

McGee Creek: Elevation 1 1/3 ft. above normal, water 73 and murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on plastic craws and crawfish colored crankbaits at 4-5 ft. against the bank. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Water 74. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on crankbaits, worms, minnows and jerk baits. White bass fair on minnows, jigs and crankbaits. Channel catfish good on worms, stinkbaits, shrimp and liver. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Walleye fair on minnows, jigs and crankbaits. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation normal and murky. Bass good on soft plastics when jigged around flooded timber at 4-8 ft. Crappie good on jigs and minnows. Channel catfish good on night crawlers around the lake as well as the spillway. Flathead catfish being caught on minnows at the spillway. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water 76 and murky. Largemouth bass good at 2-6 ft. using plastic baits and spinnerbaits fishing the weed, rock and woody shorelines. Crappie fair at 5-8 ft. using minnows fishing the deeper water just off the spawning areas. White bass fair ft trolling crankbaits and jigs at 6-8 in the Applegate Cove and Short Mountain areas. Blue and flathead catfish good at 3-10 ft. using fresh cut bait and live bait fishing the rocky shorelines. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Elevation slightly above normal. Bass excellent on spinnerbaits in weeds and along banks and on plastic worms around points. White bass good trolling crankbaits. Blue catfish good to excellent on juglines and trotlines with cut shad and shrimp. Flathead catfish good to excellent on juglines and trotlines with live bluegill and whole shad. Crappie fair on live minnows around bridges and the tower. Walleye fair trolling crankbaits around the islands. Report submitted by Alan Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation normal, water 73 and clear south and murky to muddy north. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait and sassy shad from Catfish Bay to the south. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on deep diving crankbaits and spinnerbaits near the riprap. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on live bait, cut baits and worms north of the hwy 70 bridge. Crappie fair to good on minnows around the fish attractors and underwater structures. Sunfish good on worms from the fishing docks. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 2 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad and liver. Flathead catfish excellent on sunfish. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 2 ft. below normal and steady. Crappie good to very good. Walleye good to very good though they tend to be small. Striped bass hybrids good but also many are small. White bass have slowed to fair. Blue catfish fair. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal and murky. Crappie fair at Ralph's Resort on minnows. Catfish good on juglines baited with cut bait. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County

Foss: Elevation normal, water 70 and clear. Gates closed. The holiday weekend slowed fishing with many boaters on the water. Walleye and striped hybrid bass fair. Catfish good on cut bait. Crappie fair. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal. Catfish slow to fair on juglines and cut bait. Saugeye slow to fair drifting night crawlers or trolling crankbaits. Striped bass hybrids slow to fair on shad. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County

Tom Steed: Elevation normal, water 65 and murky. White bass and striped bass hybrids good on minnows near the old highway. Catfish fair all over lake. Crappie fair on minnows in creeks. Report submitted by David Smith, game warden stationed in Kiowa County .

Waurika: Elevation normal, water 68 and murky. Striped bass hybrids fair on jigs and shad. Blue catfish fair on jigs and shad and on juglines with cut baits and live shad. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at Wichita Ridge, Chisholm, and the marina boat ramps. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County .

AT 0122 HRS US-81

FROM MEDFORD

NORTH TO THE KANSAS STATE LINE. WAS REPOENED. IT WAS CLOSED AT 1919 HRS 5/26/08 DUE TO

HIGH WATER ON THE

ROADWAY. IT WAS CLOSED FOR 6 HOURS AND 3 MINUTES.

GRANT COUNTY D.O.T. HAS CLOSED US81 FROM MEDFORD,

NORTH TO THE STATE LINE DUE TO HIGH WATER.

Services for Bob Hammer we be at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at the Christian Church in Medford.

The funeral service for Bobby Joe “Bob” Hammer, 74, of Enid, formerly of Medford, will be 10:30 a.m. Thursday, May 29, 2008, in First Christian Church of Medford. Rev. Bobby Smith and Rev. Craig VanDeburgh will officiate. A graveside service will be 3 p.m. in Ames Cemetery with military honors by Jaynes Kennedy Post No. 340 of Ames. Arrangements are by Hills-Ely Funeral Home, Medford.

Visitation will be 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home.

He was born Sept. 15, 1933, in Ringwood to Harvey Benjamin and Lucille Choate Hammer and died Monday, May 26, 2008, in St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center. He attended school in Ames graduating in 1951. He attended Oklahoma A&M College and then joined the Air Force. In 1953, he married Bonnie Reynolds in Ames. He was stationed in San Antonio, Texas, for one year, then Syracuse, N.Y., where he learned the Russian language. He was stationed in Japan then Montana, where he was honorably discharged in 1957. The couple moved to Alva where he attended Northwestern Oklahoma State University. In 1958 they moved to Stillwater, where he graduated from OSU in 1960 with degrees in animal science and agriculture education. In July 1960 they moved to Medford, and he taught vo-ag at Medford High School for three years. In 1963 he was employed as manager of Clyde Cooperative Association in Medford until 1990.

On Oct. 10, 1990, he married Janiece Lynn Anderson Taylor in Las Vegas. The couple made their home in Enid, where he was area manager for W.B. Johnston Grain Co. until he retired in June 2007.

He was a member of First Christian Church of Medford and served as deacon and elder. He was a member of Medford Lions Club, chamber of commerce, past president of Oklahoma Grain Dealers, State Farmer and honorary State Farmer.

He was preceded in death by one brother.

Survivors include his wife, Janiece, of the home; one son, Bruce Hammer of Blackwell; one daughter, Beverly Woods of Choctaw; two stepsons, Scott Taylor of Medford and Ty Taylor of Warner-Robbins, Ga.; one stepdaughter, Amy Moyer of Blackwell; his mother, Lucille Hammer of Enid; one brother, Jack D. Hammer of Enid; seven grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

Memorials may be made through Hills-Ely Funeral Home, P.O. Box 280, Medford, OK 73759, to the Medford Ambulance Fund or the Ames Cemetery Association.

The City of Medford is overlaying and crack sealing the airport runway for $263,336. The project was 95% funded through the Federal Aviation Administration. Engineer for the project is Myers Engineering from OKC and contractor is Evans and Associates from Ponca City. Approximatly 1,500 feet of cracks were sealed before the runway was overlaid. The project calls for 253,000 S.Yards of asphalt.

The City of Medford has taken over renting golf

carts at the Medford Golf Course with the retirement

of Roy Eyler.

“We have just received five new Yamaha

carts and they are available to rent starting

Saturday, May 24th,” said Dea Kretchmar, Medford City manager.

The rates will be the same as Roy's. Anyone

renting a cart has to be sixteen years old. A list of

rules is posted in the cart sheds and clubhouse.

“The golf course looks better than ever and people are

encouraged to come out and take a look around. New

memberships begin July 1st.” said Kretchmar.

Pond Creek and the town of Lamont sounded their tornado sirens Saturday evening. When funnel clouds were spotted in the area by radar and spotters. Hail also was reported in both areas.

SH74 FROM SH51 TO COVINGTON IS CLOSED DUE TO THE

STORM/ TORNADO ACTIVITY AND A HOUSE SITTING ON SH74 4

MILES S OF COVINGTON. HAVE REC'D REPORTS THAT THE

PEOPLE INSIDE THE HOUSE ARE OKAY

The Medford fire department responded twice Friday night for a smoke investigation on east Pawnee. “The residents experienced breakers in the home being blown and a while later smelling something burning. Our department responded but could not find anything,” said Dennis Brittian Medford fire chief.

A second call was received later by the MFD when the residents reported finding smoke in the attic. An electrical problem was discovered.

DROWNING OCCURRED AT 1713 HOURS ON 05/23/2008 AT THE COON CREEK COVE,

LOCATED ON KAW LAKE IN KAY COUNTY.

VICTIM: DUSTIN DACOTA SMITH, WHITE MALE, AGE: 18, OF OKLAHOMA CITY, OK.

TRANSPORTED TO GRACE MEMORIAL FUNERAL HOME, IN PONCA CITY, OK.

WHAT HAPPENED: SEVERAL SUBJECT WERE ATTEMPTING TO SWIM ACROSS THE COVE.

VICTIM BEGAN TO STRUGGLE AND WENT UNDER. 2 RESCUES WERE ATTEMPTED BY

BYSTANDERS AND WERE UNSUCCESSFUL. THE SUBJECTS BODY WAS RECOVERED AT 2034

HOURS BY DRAGGING METHOD.

INVESTIGATED BY TROOPER MATT DRUMMOND #256 OF THE LAKE PARTOL DETACHMENT,

AND ASSISTED BY TROOPER LT. MICHAEL ROE #77, TROOPER GARY FREENY #277,

TROOPER KEITH KUHN #481 ALL OF THE LAKE PATROL DETACHMENT, PONCA CITY FIRE

DEPARTMENT, KAY COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE, CORP OF ENGINEERS, AND THE MEDICAL

EXAMINER.

OHP TROOP K PERRY OPER: HANKINS

Carter Pleads No Contest to Medicaid Fraud

A Norman optician will pay almost $23,000 in restitution after pleading no contest today to Medicaid fraud, Attorney General Drew Edmondson said.

Cornelius Jemeel Carter was charged Jan. 14 in Oklahoma County District Court with one count of Medicaid fraud for allegedly double billing the Oklahoma Medicaid Program for services provided through his business, Senior Eye Care.

Carter was sentenced to a three-year deferred sentence and ordered to pay $22,880.11 in restitution, a $500 fine, $100 victim compensation assessment and court costs.

Investigators from Edmondson’s Patient Abuse and Medicaid Fraud Control Unit discovered Carter falsely billed and was paid twice for services he provided to clients at the Department of Human Services’ Southern Oklahoma Resource Center.

Edmondson’s Patient Abuse and Medicaid Fraud Control Unit has statewide jurisdiction to investigate and prosecute provider fraud and patient abuse and neglect in any Medicaid provider facility. Anyone with information regarding provider fraud or patient abuse can contact the Attorney General’s Office at (405) 521-4274.

Outdoor Marketplace returns to 2008 Oklahoma Wildlife Expo

Oklahomans interested in the outdoors should mark their calendars now for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s fourth annual Oklahoma Wildlife Expo slated for September 26-28 at the Lazy E Arena, just north of Oklahoma City .

The Wildlife Department will be working with a range of organizations, individuals and outdoor-related companies to host the Expo — an event intended to promote and develop appreciation for Oklahoma ’s wildlife and natural resources.

“The Expo is the state’s largest indoor and outdoor recreation event,” said Nels Rodefeld, information and education chief for the Wildlife Department. “Tens of thousands of people get a chance to enjoy the outdoors and maybe experience something new.”

Among many other activities, Expo visitors will be able to fish, shoot shotguns, kayak, ride mountain bikes, see and touch wildlife, attend dog training seminars and learn about recreation in the great outdoors. They will also be able to win a variety of free prizes thanks to the Expo’s generous sponsors. And just like last year, the Expo will feature the Outdoor Marketplace, a large area where commercial vendors will be selling their hunting and fishing-related merchandise and services. This year’s Marketplace will again feature venders under a large tent, but outdoor open-air spaces also have been added for displaying larger items such as ATVs and treestands. Nonprofit conservation organizations also will be able to sign up for free booth spaces to promote membership and educate sportsmen about their organizations. A 10’ x 10’ booth space under the tent costs $500, while a 20’ x 20’ outside space costs $500. Both include electricity.

“The Outdoor Marketplace was a big hit with Expo visitors last year, and we are glad to bring it back,” Rodefeld said. “It will be bigger and better than last year, and it will be a great opportunity to showcase your products to thousands of outdoorsmen.”

Log on to wildlifedepartment.com regularly to stay up to date on the upcoming Oklahoma Wildlife Expo.

For more information about obtaining a booth in the Outdoor Marketplace or to obtain an application for a booth, contact Rhonda Hurst, Wildlife Expo Coordinator

Oklahoma’s Free Fishing Days slated

Oklahomans looking to try something new with the family this summer may want to give fishing a try, and they can start June 7-8 during Oklahoma’s Free Fishing Days, which allow people to fish without state fishing licenses or permits (including trout licenses and fishing and hunting legacy permits).

Urban areas across the state offer angling opportunities through the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s Close to Home Fishing program, which provides quality fishing opportunities without a long drive into the country. Anglers also have access to a number of lakes, rivers, streams and small ponds where they can catch fish all day long as well. And those anglers who just don’t know where to start can turn to the Wildlife Department’s weekly state fishing report to find just the right place to go.

“The Department’s state fishing report reveals inside information on the best places to go angling, when the fish are biting and what baits they are hitting the most,” said Jeff Boxrucker, assistant chief of fisheries for the Wildlife Department.

Compiled by Wildlife Department personnel and independent reporters, the reports even include techniques and locations within specific waters to increase angler success. Anglers can receive the fishing report by subscribing to the Department’s weekly news release at wildlifedepartment.com/wl_news.htm.

“Fishing in Oklahoma normally requires a license and a fishing and hunting legacy permit, which you can purchase at various sporting good vendors across the state, but Free Fishing Days gives people a chance to just ‘test the waters’ and see if they would enjoy the sport,” Boxrucker said. “We are confident they will.”

Anglers should note that certain city permits may still apply to specific fishing areas during Free Fishing Days.

Oklahoma was the first state in the nation to offer free fishing days over 25 years ago and has since been followed by dozens of other states that have established similar days.

Anglers should be aware of and abide by all Texas fishing license and permit requirements when fishing the Texas portion of Lake Texoma June 7-8. The Texas Free Fishing Day is June 7, so anglers will be able to fish both Texas and Oklahoma portions of the lake for free that day. On June 8, free fishing will only be allowed on the Oklahoma portion of the lake. Anglers must follow all other fishing regulations.

FISHING REPORT FOR MAY 21, 2008

CENTRAL

Arcadia: Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits. Blue catfish good around rocky points at night. Crappie fair on minnows at 10-12 ft. Report submitted by Mark Murray, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Arcadia: Elevation normal, water 70. White bass being caught on white grubs. Channel and blue catfish being caught on cut shad. Crappie being caught on minnows at the heated dock and around rocks. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Hefner: Water 73. Smallmouth and white bass being caught. Crappie being caught on minnows. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Thunderbird: Elevation 2 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie being caught on minnows and jigs at 3-5 ft. around structure. Saugeye good on medium-diving crankbaits, sassy shad and jigs off windy points early and late day. White bass good on jigs, sassy shad, medium-diving crankbaits and in-line spinnerbaits. Largemouth bass good on plastic worms and tandem spinners in the weed beds in shallow coves. Catfish slow. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation normal, water muddy. Bass fair on plastic worms. Catfish fair on dough baits. Crappie fair on jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation normal, water 72 and murky. Crappie fair at 8-10 ft. on jigs. Catfish fair on cut bait around rocks. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Chandler: Elevation normal, water muddy. Bass being caught on plastic lures. Catfish fair on live baits. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Eucha: Elevation slightly above normal, water 70 and murky. Bluegill good on crickets and worms at 2-6 ft. on gravel bars. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Catfish fair on jug lines using cut shad. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 7 ft. above normal and dropping, water 69 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits in flooded grass and around woody plants. White bass good trolling jigs, spinnerbaits and rat-l-traps above the dam; below the dam white bass are good to excellent on jigs and minnows. Catfish good on cut shad, worms and crawdads over mud flats above the dam; catfish good on cut shad and rolling baits below the dam. Crappie slow. Paddlefish good below the dam. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 68-74. Horse Creek to above Sailboat Bridge dirty. Horse Creek to the dam is stained to lightly stained. Bass being caught on crankbaits, Carolina rigs, and spinnerbaits on main lake and secondary points. Jigs and topwater lures continue to produce. Crappie being caught up shallow, around the docks and brush piles at 6-12 ft. White bass good in Elk River on jigging spoons at 12-25 ft. Catfish good on shad and gold fish in the rivers, mid-lake and Horse Creek area. Report submitted by Littlefield’s Sporting Goods & Greg Lamb’s Guide Service.

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits in creek channels and along shoreline. Catfish good on stinkbaits and cut baits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at the fishing dock and around brush. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Keystone: Elevation 7 1/2 ft. above normal, water muddy. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and dark colored plastics at 4-8 ft. in flooded cover in coves. Smallmouth bass slow on chartreuse crankbaits, dark jigs and chunkbaits at 8-12 ft. around points. Spotted bass fair on small chrome crankbaits at 6-10 ft. around bluffs and deep coves. White bass fair on minnows and jigs at 4-8 ft. below the dam and mouths of creeks. Striped bass fair on buck tails, sassy shad and rattle baits at 3-6 ft. below the dam. Channel catfish good on chicken livers and worms at 4-8 ft. in creeks and coves. Blue catfish good on punch baits and cut shad at 5-10 ft. halfway back in coves. Flathead catfish good on punch baits and cut shad at 6-12 ft. around bluffs, riprap and below the dam. Crappie good on minnows and bright colored jigs at 3-10 ft. along spawning banks that are gravel with rocky areas. Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Oologah: Elevation 7 ft. above normal and falling, water mid-60's to near 70 and muddy. White bass good trolling with shad colored crankbaits at 10-15 ft. in the Blue and Spencer Creek areas. Channel catfish good on worms and livers at 5-10 ft. along rocky banks. Crappie fair on minnows around standing timber. Crappie suspended at 10-15 ft. Blue and channel catfish fair on shad below the dam. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water 70 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on white spinnerbaits and crankbaits at the lower end of the lake. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair drifting live shad in the main body of the lake. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs in riprap. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: White bass and striped bass hybrids good on live shad in deep water along flats. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Spavinaw: Elevation slightly above normal, water 68 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around the dam area. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Catfish fair on jug lines using cut shad. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Tenkiller: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water 72 and clearing. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair in shallow water of soft bass jigs or spinnerbaits. Crappie slow with some action at 4-8 ft. on gravel points. Catfish slow with some action on juglines with shad. Sunfish fair on worms around docks or gravel banks. Report by Monte Brooks Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls: Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits in weed beds and riprap. Catfish good on stinkbaits and cut sunfish. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around bridges and brush. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Ft. Supply: Elevation normal, water clear. Crappie good on jigs and minnows along the jetties in the shallows. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation normal, water 69 and stained. Crappie have moved to brush piles at 12-24 ft. White bass are chasing shad on ends of points. Bass being caught on Carolina-rigged lizards, tubes Texas rigged and spinnerbaits. Channel catfish being caught on baited holes. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 70 and clear. Largemouth bass fair to good on minnows and flies. Channel catfish fair on liver, worms and stinkbaits. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water 71 and clearing. Largemouth and small mouth bass being caught on soft plastic lures at 5-7 ft. along banks. Catfish fair on juglines and trotlines with sunfish. Crappie slow. Walleye good on deep running crawdad colored crankbaits at 10-15 ft. around islands and points. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 2 1/2 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastic lures flipping flooded brush. White bass good on jigs at 3-8 ft. around bridges and culverts. Blue catfish good on shad at 4-10 ft. over shallow flats. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 4-10 ft. around brush. Report submitted Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation normal, water 64. Crappie and bass good on minnows around brush. Catfish fair on cut bait. Crappie and blue catfish good below the dam during water releases. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 76 and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic worms at 3-6 ft. in weed beds and cattails. White bass and striped bass hybrids good on shad at 15 ft. in the discharge canal. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits at 8-10 ft. around points and coves. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

Lower Mountain Fork River: Trout very good in all three zones at various times on wooly buggers, soft hackles, midges and various streamers . Zones 2 and 3 are dependent on the water releases from the powerhouse. Report submitted by Beavers Bend Fly Shop.

McGee Creek: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, 70 degrees, and murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on plastic craws at 4-5 ft. right against the bank. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Elevation normal, water 70 and stained. Largemouth and smallmouth bass excellent. White bass good on minnows and jigs. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits, minnows and worms. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal water 73 and murky. Largemouth bass good at 2-5 ft. using plastic baits, spinnerbaits and shad type crankbaits fishing the weed, rock and woody shorelines. Crappie good at 3-6 ft. using minnows fishing for suspended fish just off the spawning areas. White bass fair at 10 ft. trolling crankbaits in the Applegate Cove area. Blue catfish good on fresh cut bait at 3-8 ft. near the rocky shorelines. Flathead catfish good on trotlines and juglines with live bait at 8-10 ft. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. above normal, water 69 and murky. Bass excellent on spinnerbaits in weeds and along banks and plastic worms around points. White bass good trolling crankbaits. Blue catfish good to excellent on juglines and trotlines with cut shad and shrimp. Flathead catfish good to excellent on juglines and trotlines with live bluegill and whole shad. Crappie fair on live minnows around bridges and the tower. Walleye fair trolling crankbaits around the islands. Report submitted by Alan Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 70 and clear south and murky to muddy north. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good in the coves at the south end of lake. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait and sassy shad from Platter Flats south. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on live bait, cut baits and worms with the majority of fish being caught above the Highway 70 Bridge. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs around underwater brush and fish attractors. Sunfish fair to good on worms around the fishing docks. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 4 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastic baits. Crappie good with minnows and jigs below dam. Channel and blue good on cut shad below the dam. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 2 ft. below normal and rising. Crappie poor compared to walleyes and white bass being caught when trolling. Walleye good, tend to be small. White bass good. Blue catfish fair around the old fish-o-rama. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Foss: Elevation normal with gates closed, water 70 and clear. Striped bass hybrids good near buoy line at 5 ft. near Lakeview. Walleye fair along dam on live bait. Crappie fair in marina area. Catfish good with prepared bait near Cutberth Creek. Bass fair. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: Elevation 3/4 ft. above normal. Crappie slow to fair on jigs and minnows. Saugeye slow to fair drifting night crawlers. Striped bass hybrids slow to fair on shad. White bass slow to fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish slow to fair on cut bait. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County .

Tom Steed: Elevation normal, water 65 and murky. White bass and striped bass hybrids good on minnows near the old highway. Catfish fair all over lake. Crappie fair on minnows in creeks. Report submitted by David Smith, game warden stationed in Kiowa County .

Waurika: Elevation above normal, water 68 and murky. Both gates are open and water is being released. White bass fair artificial baits and live baits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around Walker Creek Bridge and Wichita Ridge. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County

The Memorial Day weekend is upon us again this year, and while remembering

and honoring deceased loved ones, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol is

encouraging motorists to be especially careful on Oklahoma roadways. "There

were three fatalities on our roads last year during Memorial Day weekend,"

said Trooper Betsy Randolph. The cause of those fatal crashes was unsafe

speed. Alcohol was a contributing factor in one crash, and one person who

died was not wearing a seat belt. One motorcyclist was killed. He was not

wearing a helmet.

"There are some simple things people can do to ensure their safety and the

safety of their passengers, especially children, riding in vehicles this

weekend. Wear your seat belt, buckle up those little people, obey the speed

limit and don't ever drink and drive," said Trooper Randolph.

OHP will be participating in two national safety programs targeting

restraint violations. The "Click it or Ticket" campaign and "Operation

C.A.R.E (Combined Accident Reduction Effort) All American Buckle Up Week"

are enforcement programs that run before, during, and after Memorial Day.

"The Oklahoma Highway Patrol has a 'no tolerance' policy for seat belt and

child restraint violations. Troopers will focus on alcohol-related

offenses, speeding, seat belt and child restraint usage. You are likely to

see more troopers out and they will be enforcing all state laws in an

effort to keep everyone safe this holiday weekend," said Trooper Randolph.

Memorial Day weekend also means increased traffic on Oklahoma’s lakes and

rivers.

"The Lake Patrol Section of the Oklahoma Highway Patrol would like to

remind boaters that every vessel is required to carry one U.S. Coast Guard

- approved wearable life jacket for each person on board. Every person

under the age of 13 is required to wear a life jacket. We would also like

to remind people who might be drinking of the tendency for sun, wind and

waves to magnify the effects of alcohol," said Captain George Green. "The

penalties for operating a boat, jet ski, or any other water vessel while

under the influence of drugs or alcohol are the same as the penalties for

driving a car while intoxicated. Also, we ask all parents to keep a close

watch on their children when they are playing near the water."

"Let's make this a record - breaking Memorial Day weekend with fewer or no

fatality crashes," said Trooper Randolph

A once popular war is now considered one of the top despised wars this Nation has fought. The media’s negative campaign is a direct result of how American’s view the war in Iraq. The media began their blitz shortly after the war started. Have you noticed the media machines have eased their full frontal assault? Have you noticed the media barely mentions the accomplishments our great men and women strive to achieve?

The media fails to mention the accomplishments because they want the war to remain a stain on American History. They never want the public’s opinion to change.

Fortunately, smaller news agencies are actually performing real media coverage on Iraq and Afghanistan. These news reporters risk their very own lives to bring the truth back to America. We stand up and solute these men and women of the news agencies; those, which actually send a true and balance reporting of Iraq and Afghanistan.

We are proud to announce that the war in Iraq has taken a turn in the right direction, as a result of the hard work of our Armed Services and the Iraqi Military. However, you will not hear this in the main media channels. It is still a long way from total victory, but city by city the Iraqi Army—along with the American Military—is taking back the streets of Iraq. Civil War is no longer mentioned among the Iraqi citizens. All Iraqi citizens are coming together to force those that are causing Iraqi and American Military deaths out of Iraq.

Please continue to pray for our Military Members. The job is not finished, but we can see the finish line.

Krugerrands, a $1,000 bill and Billy Beer among items

A $1,000 bill, 10 one-ounce gold Krugerrands, a Nolan Ryan baseball card and an empty six-pack of Billy Beer cans - those are just some of the items from more than 300 abandoned safe deposit boxes scheduled for auction next Thursday in Oklahoma City, State Treasurer Scott Meacham announced today.

The contents of 324 abandoned safe deposit boxes will be auctioned starting at 11 o'clock, Thursday, May 22nd. The items to be auctioned have been in the custody of the

treasurer's office for several years.

"After trying for years to find the owners of the contents of these safe deposit boxes, the time has come to clear out our vault to make room for more property," Meacham said. "However, the money raised from the auction will be held in trust for the owners."

Meacham said a couple of rare items have been reunited with their owners, thanks to an aggressive effort by his unclaimed property staff.

"We originally planned to auction tickets to Woodstock and a first-edition Rolling Stone magazine, but my staff was able to identify the owners," he said. "Both of the owners are happy we were able to return their property."

A complete list of auction items has been posted to the treasurer's web site at www.treasurer.ok.gov.

State law requires banks to bring abandoned safe deposit box contents to the treasurer's office along with the name and last known address of the owners. The contents must be delivered to the state five years after the banks lose track of the owners. The treasurer then advertises the

information in newspapers and on the Internet.

The auction will be held at Dakil Auctioneers, 200 N.W. 114th Street, Oklahoma City.

The building is located north of Hefner Road on the west side of the Broadway Extension. Registration and inspection will begin at 9:00 a.m. For more information, contact the auction house at (405) 751-6179 or www.dakil-auction.com.

The Oklahoma "Click it or Ticket" campaign began today and will run through

June 1st. The Oklahoma Highway Patrol, along with 256 Oklahoma law

enforcement agencies, will participate in the event. Law enforcement

officers will target area motorists who are in violation of Oklahoma's

mandatory seat belt use act.

A 2007 seat belt observation study performed for the Oklahoma Highway

Safety Office gives the following statistics regarding Oklahoma safety belt

users:

The estimated seat belt use for drivers and front seat passengers in

Oklahoma for the summer 2007 was 83.1% statewide and 90.8% for the Tulsa

region. The study targeted passenger cars, vans, SUVs and pickups.

The following is a weighted percent table for all vehicles:

Statewide:

Cars 85.9%

Vans 87.8%

SUVs 86.5%

Pickups 75.3%

The Oklahoma Mandatory Seat Belt Use Act states in part, "Every operator

and front seat passenger of a passenger car operated in this state shall

wear a properly adjusted and fastened seat belt system, required to be

installed in the motor vehicle when manufactured."

The Oklahoma law regarding passenger and child restraint systems states, in

part, "Every driver, when transporting a child under six (6) years of age

in a motor vehicle operated on the roadways, streets, or highways of this

state, shall provide for the protection of said child by properly using a

child passenger restraint system."

Children at least six (6) years of age but younger than thirteen (13) years

of age shall be protected by use of a child passenger restraint system or a

seat belt.

The fine for violating the mandatory seat belt law is $20.00 and any person

convicted of violating the child restraint law shall be punished by a fine

of $50.00 plus court costs.

Medford emergency personal responded to a two-vehicle accident at 10:00 p.m. Sunday night May 18th, one mile east of Medford on Apache.

According to OHP trooper Matt Wilczek's accident report, a 2000 Chevrolet pickup driven by Brice Alan Cless, 16, Medford was southbound when it failed to yield at a 4-way uncontrolled intersection to a 1982 Mercedes eastbound driven by David J. Sladek, 46, Medford. Striking to Mercedes on the drivers side. After impact both vehicles came to rest southeast of the intersection.

Brice Cless was treated and release from Bass hospital in Enid. His passenger Cameron killain, 15 was not injured.

David Sladek was transported to the Blackwell hospital by Medford EMS department and admitted in serious condition with internal trunk injuries. His passenger William Postlewaite, 50, was transported by private vehicle to St. Mary’s and admitted with internal and head injuries and admitted in stable condition.

According to the report seat belts were in use in both vehicles and the cause of the accident was listed as failure to yeild to the vehicle on the right.

Medford resident Rosemary Cowger, 56, escaped injuries Saturday afternoon when she was involved in a car/motorcycle accident just north of Ponca City at Hubbard and Waverly when the vehicle she was driving was struck in the rear by a 2002 Harley Davidson Sportster driven by Roger Gibson, 49, Ponca City.

According to OHP report, Gibson and a passenger Shannon McDaniels 23, Ponca City WAS NORTHBOUND on Hubbard Road AT HIGH RATE OF SPEED. Cowger also northbound stopped AT A STOP SIGN, TURNING WEST. Gibson RAN

THE STOP SIGN, SWERVED RIGHT AND STRUCK the Cowger 1987 Toyota Camry in the rear as the vehicle was turning.

Gibson was admitted and listed in STABLE CONDITION WITH HEAD, ARM AND LEG INJURIES.

SHANNON MCDANIELS, was admitted IN SERIOUS CONDITION

WITH HEAD, ARM, LEG, TRUNK INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL INJURIES Both were transported to VIA CHRISTIE Hospital in Ponca city.

According to the report, HELMETS were not in use by either the driver or passenger of the motorcycle. The CONDITION OF Gibson was listed on the report as IMPAIRED BY ALCOHOL and the cause of the collision as DUI

The accident was INVESTIGATED BY TROOPER JIM ARMSTRONG #246 OF THE OSAGE COUNTY DETACHMENT.

ASSISTED BY TROOPER ALLEN YOUNG #332 AND TROOPER JUSTIN BARNEY #332 BOTH OF

THE KAY COUNTY DETACHMENT, PONCA CITY POLICE DEPARTMENT, PONCA CITY FIRE

DEPARTMENT AND THE KAY COUNTY SHERIFFF'S OFFICE.

Disciplinary Hearings

Billy Beets, M.D. – Applicant, full medical license – full license reinstated

Dahyabhai Dhimmar, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging prescribing violations –

License suspended; evaluation by CPEP required along with ethics course on

writing prescriptions for controlled dangerous substances (CDS).

Stephen V. Paul, P.A. – Disciplinary hearing alleging violation of Board Order – License

revoked.

Peggy Diane Satterly, R.C. – Disciplinary hearing alleging falsifying licensure renewal -

Surrender In Lieu of Prosecution accepted.

Elliott Howe – Applicant, reinstatement of a suspended medical license – Reinstated

under terms of indefinite probation restricting practice to White Eagle Clinic,

limiting work hours, requiring monitoring and other standard terms of

probation.

Kenneth Kirk, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging violation of probation – Voluntary

Submittal to Jurisdiction rejected. Case set for hearing at the July 17, 2008

Board meeting.

Wesley E. Pope, M.D. – Disciplinary hearing alleging sexual misconduct and prescribing

violations – Voluntary Submittal to Jurisdiction accepted imposing 90-day

suspension followed by a five-year probation with standard terms.

Mark Rigney – Applicant, reinstatement of surrendered medical license – Licensed

reinstated under terms of indefinite probation with terms that include all

previous terms of probation in addition to a restriction on practice location

FISHING REPORT FOR MAY 14, 2008

CENTRAL

Thunderbird: Elevation 3 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near or on structure at 2-5 ft. White bass good off points with medium-diving crankbaits, sassy shad, jigs and spinners. Largemouth bass good on tandem spinners and plastic worms in shallow areas with structure. Saugeye good on jigs, sassy shad and medium-diving crankbaits off points. Catfish slow. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County.

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation above normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits. Catfish slow. Crappie fair jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County.

Chandler: Elevation normal and muddy. Largemouth bass slow. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County.

Copan: Elevation 4 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie fair on minnow and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Blue catfish are good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County.

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 16 ft. above normal, water 64 and murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits in flooded grass and buck brush. White bass good upstream and off points. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Channel catfish good on artificial baits, shad, earthworms, chicken liver and chicken gizzard in the flowing water of the mud flats and off points. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County.

Grand: Elevation 4 1/2 ft. above normal, water 66-72 and murky. Bass being caught from boats on crankbaits and from rock banks on jigs and topwater lures. Catfish fair in the rivers on shad. White bass good in Elk River on jigging spoons at 12-25 ft. Report submitted by Littlefield’s Sporting Goods & Greg Lamb’s Guide Service.

Grand (upper end): Elevation above normal and rising, water 60-65 and murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and buzz baits. White bass fair to good on pink and white spinnerbaits and silver slab spoons. Catfish good on live bait, brooders, Secret 7 stinkbait and shad guts. Crappie fair on minnows and dark-colored jigs at 7-10 ft. in coves and docks. Paddlefish slow, with small fish being caught in rivers. Gar good on gar gitters. Report submitted by Sam Williams, Grand Lake Sports Center.

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Catfish good on cut bait and stinkbaits on bottom. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around brush and fishing dock. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

Hulah: Elevation 11 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Blue catfish are good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County.

Keystone: Elevation 11 ft. above normal, water muddy. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits, jigs and chunkbaits at 3-5 ft. in flooded cover in backs of coves and creeks. Smallmouth bass slow on crankbaits, jigs and chunkbaits at 5-10 ft. around points. Spotted bass fair on dark-colored worms and spinnerbaits at 4-8 ft. in deep coves just inside mouth. White bass fair on minnows and small jigs at 4-8 ft. in mouths of creeks and bridges. Striped bass fair on rat-l-trap baits and bucktails at 3-6 ft. below the dam. Channel catfish fair on worms at 4-8 ft. in creeks and shallow coves. Blue catfish good on cut shad and punchbaits at 5-10 ft. just inside coves. Flathead catfish good on large shiners and goldfish at 5-10 ft. around bluffs in deep coves. Crappie good on jigs and minnows at 2-10 ft. along riprap banks, gravel banks and below the dam. Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Oologah: Elevation 12 ft. above normal, water in mid-60s and muddy. Channel catfish good along rocky banks on livers and worms at 5-10 ft. Crappie fair around flooded trees at 8-10 ft. on minnows. Channel and blue catfish fair on shad below the dam. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County.

Webbers Falls: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and jigs in creek channels and riprap. Catfish good on cut bait on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around bridges and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County.

NORTHWEST

Ft. Supply: Elevation normal, water clear. Crappie good on jigs and minnows along the jetties in the shallows. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County.

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation normal, water 67 and stained. White bass excellent on points and in front of dam. Crappie good on jigs along banks in coves. Bass slow to good using Carolina-rigged lizards, spinnerbaits and topwater lures early. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 67 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on minnows and flies. Catfish fair on liver, worms and stinkbaits. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Largemouth bass being caught around structure on soft plastics. Crappie good in flooded timber on minnows and jigs. Walleye being caught after dark around islands and off rocky points. North Carson Creek boat ramp is open. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Eufaula: Elevation 2 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on plastic baits and jigs flipping flooded brush at 2-6 ft. White bass good around bridges and culverts where there is a current. Blue catfish good on shad at 3-10 ft. Crappie fair on minnows or jigs at 3-10 ft. in culverts, rocky areas and bridges. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County.

Hugo: Elevation normal, water 63. Crappie and bass fair on minnows around button brush. Catfish getting better on goldfish and cut bait using either trotlines or jugs. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan Counties.

McGee Creek: Elevation 1 2/3 ft. above normal, water 67 degrees and murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on plastic craws at 4-5 ft. right against the bank. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County.

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation above normal, water 71 and murky. Largemouth bass good at 2-5 ft. using plastic baits and spinnerbaits fishing the weed, rock and woody shorelines. Crappie good at 5-7 ft. using minnows fishing the deeper water just off the spawning beds. White bass slow at 10 ft. using jigs fishing below the dams. Blue catfish good at 3-10 ft. using fresh cut bait fishing the windy shorelines with rock spawning areas. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County.

Sardis Lake: Elevation 2 ft. above normal and clear to murky. Largemouth bass excellent on plastics around points and on white spinnerbaits with red flecks around timber. White bass excellent up creeks and trolling lake. Blue catfish good to excellent on cut bait and shrimp on juglines and trotlines and around islands and in flooded fields. Flathead catfish good to excellent on small baitfish on trotlines and juglines. Crappie excellent around bridges and brush piles on minnows. Walleye fair trolling islands. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County.

Texoma: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. below normal, water 68 and clear south and murky north. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on slow-moving baits in the south part of the lake. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait and sassy shad from the islands north. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on live bait and cut shad from Platter Flats north. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs around underwater structure and fish attractors. Sunfish good to excellent on worms around the fishing docks. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County.

Wister: Elevation 9 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastic baits. Crappie good with minnows and jigs below dam. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad below the dam. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County.

SOUTHWEST

Ft. Cobb: Elevation 3/4 ft above normal. Crappie slow to fair on minnows and jigs in shallow water. Saugeye slow on sassy shad and night crawlers. Striped bass hybrids and white bass slow to fair on sassy shad. Catfish slow to fair on cut baits. Report submitted by James Edwards, Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County.

Tom Steed: Elevation normal, water 65 and murky. White bass and crappie good on minnows. Report submitted by David Smith, game warden stationed in Kiowa County.

Waurika: Elevation above normal, water 68 and murky. White bass fair on artificial baits and live baits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around Walker Creek Bridge and Wichita Ridge. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County.

15: Structure Fishing workshop at the Broken Arrow Bass Pro shop. This class will teach you what lure to use and what structure to fish during the summer. Meet at the Fish Aquarium at 7 p.m.

15-18: The Annual " Canton Lake Walleye Rodeo."

16: National Wild Turkey Federation Broken Arrow chapter fundraising banquet will be held at the Clarion Hotel in Broken Arrow from 6-10 p.m. For more information contact Jesse Hardcastle at (918) 557-1083.

17: Wildflower Walk at Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge. A casual walk will be enjoyed at two or three stops in order to identify wildflowers located in a variety of habitats. Each tour will last approximately two and one half hours. Due to the length of the program, children must be at least eight years of age to participate. A $5 reservation fee per participant will be collected at the beginning of the tour. Reservations will be retained until 10 minutes prior to the beginning of the tour. After that time, standbys will be accepted. If the bus seating is filled after accepting standbys, late arrivals with reservations will not be able to participate in the program. The bus will depart promptly at 10 a.m. Reservations are accepted on a first come, first served basis and may be made by telephoning the Visitor Center at (580) 429-3222.

17: Oklahoma Youth Hunter Education Challenge will be held in Norman . Youth who have completed their hunter education certification are invited to participate. For more information contact Carey Pribil at (405) 613-8755 or log on to yhec.org.

17: National Wild Turkey Federation JAKES Day south of Grove. For more information contact Shane Berry at (918) 801-2840.

17: National Wild Turkey Federation Burgess Creek chapter fundraising banquet will be held at the Henryetta Civic Center in Henryetta from 6-10 p.m. For more information contact Margaret Baughman at (918) 652-4888.

17: The Muscular Dystrophy Association hosts an Annual Charity Fishing Tournament at Calypso Cove Marina, Lake Thunderbird . For more information contact Cindy Carlton at (405) 722-8001.

17-18: Backwoods Bowhunters 3-D shoot. The Backwoods Bowhunters Range is located 7 1/2 miles west of Hwy 4 or 4 1/2 miles east of Hwy 81 on Britton Road between Yukon and El Reno . For more information contact Pat Finnigan at (405) 262-7559 or Johnny Pappan at (405) 863-5736.

19: Sonar 101 at the Broken Arrow Bass Pro Shop. Bass Pro Shops Marine experts will cover fish finder installation and how to properly read a fish finder. It will begin at 7 p.m. in the Seminar Room.

18: Woodward Archers 3-D Shoot. Range Directions from 48th St and Oklahoma Ave : go one mile west, turn left off Hwy 15 go south two and one half miles west. For more information contact Ed Kinney at (580) 256-3320 or Frank Patterson, Jr. at (580) 256-6613. Memberships available; shoots are open events. Sign in begins at 7:30 a.m. and closes at 2:30 p.m.

20: Outdoor Cooking 101 at the Broken Arrow Bass Pro Shop. Camping Kate teaches you all about cooking in the great outdoors. Learn everything from pie iron to Dutch oven and foil pack cooking. This class will begin at 7 p.m. in the camping department.

24: Wildflower Walk at Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge. A casual walk will be enjoyed at two or three stops in order to identify wildflowers located in a variety of habitats. Each tour will last approximately two and one half hours. Due to the length of the program, children must be at least eight years of age to participate. A $5 reservation fee per participant will be collected at the beginning of the tour. Reservations will be retained until 10 minutes prior to the beginning of the tour. After that time, standbys will be accepted. If the bus seating is filled after accepting standbys, late arrivals with reservations will not be able to participate in the program. The bus will depart promptly at 10 a.m. Reservations are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis and may be made by telephoning the Visitor Center at (580) 429-3222.

24: Sooner Retriever Club Training day. For more information contact Bill Blochowiak at (405) 279-1288.

May 25: Pointing Dog Journal & Quail Ridge Hunting and Sporting Clays first Annual Fun Hunt and Picnic. To be held at 8 a.m. at Quail Ridge Hunting and Sporting clays in Tecumseh. Even will feature great prizes to be given away, free shooting seminar, free product Expo, dog training tips and tricks, barbecue from Van’s Pig Stand, sporting clays, wobble traps, good friends and more. Cost is $50 per hunter (includes released birds and lunch); $10 lunch for non-hunters. Licenses required for hunters; Sporting Clays, 5-Stand and Wobble available for additional cost. Registration required. To register, send check payable to Oklahoma Fun Hunt, 5804 Heritage Lane NE Piedmont , OK 73078 . For more information, contact Kelly McGonigal at (405) 306-0283 or StarSetters@hotmail.com or James Dietsch at (888) 855-0013 or jamesd@villagepress.com.

26: Proper Tournament Fish Care at the Broken Arrow Bass Pro Shop. This workshop will cover the correct method to catch and release bass. It will begin at 7 p.m. in the Seminar Room.

27: Base Camping Seminar at the Broken Arrow Bass Pro Shop. Learn the basics in car camping and what basic equipment you need and fun activities to do. Bass Pro Shops expert, Camping Kate, will be teaching this class in the Camping Department at 7 p.m.

31: National Wild Turkey Federation Creek County Cutters chapter fundraising banquet will be held at the Creek County Fairgrounds in Kelleyville from 6-10 p.m. For more information contact John Longacre at (918) 224-7700.

31: National Wild Turkey Federation Wheelin' Sportsmen Oklahoma Sponsor Appreciation Benefit will be held in McAlester . For more information contact Gary Garmon at (918) 423-2479.

Grant County 4-H Members Do Well in Trap Shoot

Five members of the Grant County 4-H Shooting Sports Shotgun Team did well at the recent NW District 4-H Invitational Trap Shoot held Saturday, May 10, at the Grand National Quail Gun Club north of Enid.

There were 119 individuals making up 34 teams from 15 counties across Oklahoma. The wind was strong out of the southeast when the contest started at 9 a.m. and stayed that way during the contest coming out of the west at the conclusion of the shooting. Wind speed and direction are critical in trap shooting.

Grant County 4-H members participating in this event were Stuart Strait, Ty Barnard, Jacob Bollman, Russell Rapp and Justin Kirby.

The Senior Team tied for 5th place with 2 other teams with a score of 129 out of a possible 150. To break the tie each team went back to the line and shot 10 more targets. The Grant County team broke 25 out of 30 to win the tie and take home the 5th place Senior Team trophies.

Individually, Justin Kirby tied for 2nd place in the 16 and over year olds age division with a score of 47 out of 50. He broke 8 out of 10 in the tie breaker and received the 3rd place trophy in his age division.

Congratulations to these young men for a great performance at this trap shoot contest. They are fired up for the next round of contest that will be held in the fall.

An Enid Judge's Son charged and sentenced in Grant County district court Thursday May 15 on two misdemeanor drug charges.

Christopher Matthew Grey, 35, Raleigh, N.C. was charge with unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of controlled substance.

According to the affidavit filed, on May 14 OHP trooper Kevin Edsall was traveling northbound on U.S. 81 approximately 5 miles north of Pond Creek when the trooper noticed a blue SUV traveling southbound. Edsall confirmed the SUV traveling 80 in a 65-speed zone.

According to court records, when the trooper asked for Grey’s driver license he noticed an odor that is associated with burnt Marijuana. A search of the SUV revealed a plastic bottle with a green leafy substance in it, as well as a glass pipe with burnt residue.

Grey was arrested and transported to the Grant County jail.

On May 15, the next day, the matter came before Judge Hammontree for sentencing. Grey appeared personally and without counsel. Steven Young, ADA, for Grant County represented the State. Grey entered a plea of guilty of the crime of possession of controlled substance and drug paraphernalia.

Judge Hammontree handed down a deferred sentence on, both first offense charges, for five years until May 2013 during which time Grey is placed on probation. The terms and conditions of probation are; Grey is not to violate any statutes of the states or federal government or any municipal ordinances. Grey is to pay costs, VCF, restitution, and deferral fee. Special rules and conditions of the probation; Grey is to obtain counseling for drug abuse until released by a counselor and provide proof of completion to the office of the district court, by May 31, 2009.

Nardin Heritage Celebration Set for May 24

The Friends of Nardin organization will host their 31st annual Antique Vehicle Parade and Heritage Celebration on Saturday, May 24.

The parade begins at 10:30 a.m. down Nardin's Main Street, features some of the finest antique vehicles around.

Last year over 60 units were in the parade, which included fine vintage cars, trucks, tractors and horse-drawn vehicles.

There are usually several horse-back riders in the parade too, and numerous children on bicycles, four-wheelers etc. It is one of the highlights of the day. There is no need to pre-register for the parade.

Immediately following the parade, a gunfight will break out on Main Street near the Ox-Yoke Saloon, which will be dispensing ice-cold sarsaparilla.

Gunfighters from the Enid will be in town for the occasion. Country and western music will be provided in the Pecan grove on the north side of Main Street by Don Storck and the Quarternotes of Wichita, Kan.

Sloppy joe sandwiches, polish sausage and hot dogs complete with baked beans, potato salad and potato chips. Ice-cold drinks, including sparkling water, various kinds of sodas and iced-tea will be available, along with some delicious home-made pies and cakes, will be available for a fee.

Following lunch, Lee Fairchild of Washington, Okla. will put his trained dogs through their paces.

Fairchild has performed at area rodeos and at football games during half-time around Oklahoma. His dogs are state champions when it comes to snatching a frisbee out of the air.

Next on the program will be an old-fashioned cake walk in the Pecan grove with some good old foot-stomping music provided by The Quarternotes.

Another gunfight will take place near the Ox-Yoke Saloon after the cake walk and at the same time an antique tractor pull will be going on at the south edge of town.

The tractor pull is put on by local antique tractor enthusiasts. Other events taking place throughout the day for the kids will be turtle races, horse and carriage rides, a kiddie barrel train ride, a 40 foot tall inflated "rocket" slide and a moon walk.

A quilt show in the Nardin Methodist Church gym and the Friends of Nardin Heritage House will be open for visitors to browse through the hundreds of photos and memorabilia from Nardin's past.

For further information, please contact L. V. Crow at 580-363-4760 or 580-789-1756 (Cell). Nardin is located just off of State Highway 11, six miles west of I-35 at the Blackwell exit.

Senate Approves School Security Act

Parent’s may feel a little more at ease sending their children to Oklahoma school’s next year with the state Senate on Wednesday approving a comprehensive measure intended to make Oklahoma schools safer. Senate Bill 1941, the Oklahoma School Security Act, includes numerous provisions to secure school facilities, reduce school violence and bullying and involve school administrators in making their schools safer places for students and staff.

Sen. Todd Lamb, author of the bill, said it was imperative that the Legislature take action to reduce the frequency of violent crime and bullying in schools.

"Passage of this bill is an important first step toward making our schools safer," said Lamb, R-Edmond. "We have a responsibility to ensure our schools are safe environments for students and educators. Parents should never have to worry for the safety of their children when they are at our schools."

SB 1941 would require that schools practice lockdowns two times each year. Under current law, schools are only required to practice lockdowns once each year. The bill would also ensure that school administrators have a place on regional Homeland Security Advisory boards.

Additionally, the measure includes provisions to reduce, and more effectively police, bullying. The Oklahoma School Security Act would add electronic communications to the state's bullying statutes. Electronic communications cannot be considered bullying under current law.

Lamb said the safety and security of the state's most vulnerable citizens should be the first priority of any government, and that the Legislature must do everything in its power to reduce the risk of tragedy.

"After the Columbine tragedy several years ago, the United States Department of Education conducted a study and found that 71 percent of school shootings were perpetrated by victims of bullying," Lamb said. "Given those findings, it's important that we give local school districts the chance to address the issue. I'm pleased the Senate voted in favor of the bill and look forward to its implementation in our schools."

SB 1941 now advances to the Governor's desk.

Medford’s First, Second, and Third graders enjoyed a very special end of the school year field trip May 14th with a lunchtime picnic, and miniature golf, in Medford Lions Park. Picture is second grader receiving a ride around Medford with Keith Hawkins and his team of mules.

Everyone is invited to a "Come and Go" 80th Birthday Celebration for Gerald Koehn Saturday May 24th 2008 in the Community Room at 615 N. Front Street from 2 to 4 p.m. The family is requesting no gifts.
The Busy Moms will hold their annual Spaghetti Supper Thursday evening starting at 5 p.m. at the Medford Civic Center Proceeds will be used to help defray cost for the Senior Citizens Christmas party.
Harry Frieouf will celebrate his 89th Birthday May 23. Hid family is request a Card Shower for him. His address is 218 South 7th St. Medford, Oklahoma 73759
harry Frieouf will celebrate his 89th Birthday Friday May 23rd. His family id requesting a card Shower for him his address is 218 S. 7th Medford, Oklahoma 73759
The Medford Chamber of Commerce is selling raffle tickets for camping gear valued over $300.00 to help raise money for the fireworks Display that will be held at the Medford Airport on Thursday July 3rd. The drawing for the camping gear will be held at 9 p.m. right before the display. but, the winner does have to be present to win. To purchase you raffle tickets contact any Chamber member a list of members is available at City Hall.
Rev. Randy Schuneman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Don Schuneman, will be speaking and showing pictures of his recent trip to the Holy Land at 6 p.m. Sunday night, May 18th at the Church of the Nazarene here in Medford. Randy is the pastor of the Church of the Nazarene to Bartlesville, Oklahoma. This will be interesting and informative, and everyone is in invited to attend this special service.

A long struggle came to a positive end when Gov. Brad Henry signed House Bill 3060, a measure creating a public umbilical cord blood bank in Oklahoma.

The new law, by Senator Jay Paul Gumm and Rep. Rebecca Hamilton, establishes the public cord blood bank, eventually giving every Oklahoma family the ability to donate umbilical cord blood. The pair of lawmakers has sponsored the measure for several years, finally securing passage over a number of obstacles this year.

"A cord blood bank will make possible the next great steps forward in medical care," said Gumm, a Democrat from Durant. "This new law eventually will give every Oklahoma family a chance to protect and save lives. Donors also will expand the genetic diversity in existing cord blood banks, which will open the doors to even more families facing life-threatening illnesses."

The bill directs the state Health Department to create the cord blood bank, subject to private and public funding. Banking would be free to Oklahoma families choosing to use the bank. Also, the bill requires doctors and hospitals treating pregnant women to educate their patients about cord blood banking, storage and usage.

The law also directs the state Commissioner of Health to investigate whether partnering with existing public cord blood banks would be more cost effective. The health commissioner is required to report findings to the Legislature before the 2009 session begins.

Currently, the only option to store cord blood Oklahoma families have is to contract with private umbilical cord blood banks. That cost is several thousands of dollars upfront, and hundreds annually in storage costs. The costs, Gumm said, are cost prohibitive for most young families starting out with a new baby.

Umbilical cord blood - now most often discarded as medical waste - is rich in adult stem cells, which can be used to treat a variety of illnesses. Among the maladies currently being treated with cord blood therapy are many cancers, leukemia, and several immune disorders; researchers say the list of maladies treatable with cord blood will only expand.

Creation of the Oklahoma cord blood bank comes at an exciting time of research, Gumm said. "Recently, the many network morning shows reported the story of a two-year-old boy with cerebral palsy," he related.

"After an infusion of his own stem cells during a clinical trial at Duke University, he is now showing fewer signs of the disorder; his parents had banked his umbilical cord blood. With enactment of HB 3060, the means is now in place to allow Oklahoma families the same opportunity."

Rep. Rebecca Hamilton, D-Oklahoma City, said the creation of a cord blank bank could especially benefit ethnic groups that have fewer cord blood samples banked, making genetic matches more difficult.

"This bill will save lives," she said. "A cord blood bank will allow Oklahoma to lead the way in ethical stem-cell research, collecting adult stem cells from the creation of life, rather than the destruction of life."

Gumm said passage of the measure represents an investment in life. "I believe history will show this will be one of the most important bills ever passed by the Oklahoma Legislature," he concluded. "This plan will leave a legacy of better health in Oklahoma, for the current generation and those yet unborn."

OHP TO HONOR SLAIN TROOPERS

Friday, May 26, 1978 was one of the deadliest days in the history of the

Oklahoma Highway Patrol.

Trooper Billy Young and Trooper Pappy Summers were shot and killed while

participating in a manhunt for two escapees from the McAlester

Penitentiary. Troopers Young and Summers encountered the fugitives on a

county road near Kenefic and were killed in the ensuing gunfight. Within

minutes, OHP aircraft spotted the escapees' stolen vehicle at a residence

in Caddo and directed OHP patrol units to that area. Another gunfight

erupted, and Second Lieutenant James "Pat" Grimes was shot and killed.

On Monday, May 26, 2008 at 10:00 a.m., the Oklahoma Highway Patrol will

honor the three slain troopers with a service in Caddo at the intersections

of McPhearson and Court Streets. The ceremony will include a 21-gun salute

by the OHP Honor Guard, the posting of a new American flag at the site, and

the setting of a wreath in remembrance of their fallen.

Everyone is encouraged to attend.

Ice Storm Victims to Get Free LaQuinta Rooms

Oklahomans who were overcharged for hotel rooms during last December’s ice storms will receive free rooms or refunds after Attorney General Drew Edmondson settled a price gouging case against LaQuinta Inns.

An investigation by Edmondson’s Consumer Protection Unit revealed the company violated Oklahoma’s Emergency Price Stabilization Act by artificially raising its room rates during a declared state of emergency. The company operates hotels under the names LaQuinta Inns, LaQuinta Inns and Suites and Baymont Inns and Suites.

“We began this investigation after receiving reports that prices had increased because of the ice storm,” Edmondson said. “We discovered LaQuinta overcharged consumers, on average, between $10-$20 per night. We are still working to determine the exact number of consumers who were overcharged. We are dealing with six locations, with a total of 735 rooms, over a 10-day period.”

According to the agreement, LaQuinta will provide a free night’s stay to eligible consumers who stayed one to three nights. Consumers who stayed four to six nights will receive two free nights and consumers who stayed seven or more nights will receive three free nights. The free nights are received on a per room basis, are not subject to blackout dates and can be used at any LaQuinta hotel within the continental United States. The certificates expire two years from the date of issuance.

Consumers who stayed at the following locations between Dec. 10 and Dec. 20, 2007, may be eligible:

La Quinta 632, 5501 Tinker Diagonal, Del City, OK 73115;

La Quinta 940, 800 South Meridian, Oklahoma City, OK 73108;

La Quinta 967, 930 Ed Noble Drive, Norman, OK 73072;

La Quinta 179, 4829 NW Expressway, Oklahoma City, OK 73132;

Baymont Inn 4014, 4530 East Skelly Drive, Tulsa, OK 74135;

Baymont Inn 807, 8315 South I-35, Oklahoma City, OK 73149.

Free room certificates will be mailed to eligible consumers starting in late July. LaQuinta will distribute certificates to eligible consumers unless the consumer contacts the attorney general to decline.

“In almost every instance, the free night certificate will be of greater value to the consumer,” Edmondson said. “Only those consumers wanting a refund of the overcharge will need to contact our office. Consumers wanting the certificate do not need to take any further action.”

Eligible consumers who wish to receive a reimbursement for the overcharge instead of the free room should contact the attorney general’s office by June 12 at (405) 521-3921, www.oag.ok.gov or in writing at 313 NE 21st Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. Consumers will need to present documentation of their stay. Consumers with questions regarding this settlement should contact the attorney general’s office.

The company will also pay the state $50,000 to be used for consumer protection enforcement activities.

Edmondson said business travelers who stayed at these locations during this time but were charged previously-negotiated corporate rates are not eligible. The settlement is intended for those people displaced by the ice storm, he said.

Oklahoma’s price gouging statute prohibits an increase of more than 10 percent in the price of most goods and services when a state of emergency has been declared.

“No person for the duration of a declaration of emergency by the Governor of this state or by the President of the United States and for thirty (30) days thereafter shall sell, rent, or lease, or offer to sell, rent, or lease, for delivery in the emergency area, any goods, services, dwelling units, or storage space in the emergency area at a rate or price which is more than ten percent (10%) above the rate or price charged by the person for the same or similar goods, services, dwelling units, or storage spaces immediately prior to the declaration of emergency unless the increase in the rate or price is attributable only to factors unrelated to the emergency and does not include any increase in profit to the seller or owner,” the statute says.

Leisa Ann Brittain former Grant County sheriff office dispatcher and Treasurer for the department’s reserves officers was sentenced Monday on felony and misdemeanor charges of embezzlement, making false entries in a public book, and second-degree forgery by Judge Ronald G. Franklin.

Brittain was given five years deferred sentence on each case plus make full restitution in the amount of $12,711.50 making payment of $250.00 a month starting June 5, 2008 plus jail and court cost amounting to over $5,600, along with a $40.00 probation and Parole fee payable each month.

Brittain is to report to her probation officer with 72 hours, Rules of her probation are; never leave the county of residence or state of Oklahoma without receiving written permission from the probation officer, violate any laws, statutes or ordinances of any jurisdiction which includes State, Federal and Municipal, not use or possess any alcoholic beverage, not use or possess, sell or deliver any controlled substance, do not associate with convicted felons or lewd persons, or carry a concealable weapon of any type. Be gainfully employed or engaged in an occupation. The deferred sentence will be accelerated if any part of the probation is broken.

Medford Dead-Beat Dad Being Charged

A Medford man Christopher E. Irvin has been charged and an Arrest Warrant issued in Grant County district court on one felony count of omitting to provide for minor children as order by the court.

According to the affidavit filed, an affiant of the District Four Child Support Enforcement Specialist reviewed the case filed and found the following; That on or between the 1stof April 2005 and the 8th of May 2008 Irvin omitted to pay child support for three minor children following a divorce hearing Dec. 23, 2003 involving Katherine Nibarger and the Defendant Christopher Irvin.

According to court records, Irvin the defendant, is now delinquent in child support in the sum of $18,018.02.

The affidavit further states that Irvin’s drivers license was revoked for failure to make required monthly payments from May 31, 2005 through July 19 2007, when it was reinstated for making three consecutive payments.

This crime is punishable by a fine of up to $5,000 or imprisonment for up to four years or both.

The cost of mailing a letter goes up a penny to 42 cents on Monday, the latest in what are expected to be annual price adjustments by the Postal Service.

A new law regulating the post office makes it easier to raise rates as long as the agency doesn't exceed the rate of inflation. Rates are to be adjusted each May.

But the post office also has introduced a way for people to save money when the price goes up, the Forever stamp, which remains valid for first-class postage regardless of any increases.

With the rate increase approaching, sales of the Forever stamp reached 64 million-a-day in April, postal officials said.

Forever stamps currently sell for 41-cents, but can be used after the rate increase without any additional postage. However, when the rate goes up, so does the price of Forever stamps.

Unlike the Forever stamps, other 41-cent stamps will require additional postage under the new rates, and postal officials said they printed an additional 1.5 billion 1-cent stamps in anticipation of the demand.

Gasoline, Lighter and Young Boys Equals Fire

The Medford fire department with their quick action and excellent skill saved two Medford homes from being destroyed by fire Saturday afternoon

When Medford firefighters arrived on the scene, in the 300 block of south second, a small building was fully engulfed in flames. Firefighters were able to extinguish the fire quickly and save the home directly in front and the home next door to the south. With wind speed of 42 mph gusts and the burning building could have caused major damage to both houses.

Darla Fore’s property sustained minor water damage and a broken door glass when firefighters needed to enter the house to check for possible fire in the attic

The MFD used at backhoe to take down the rest of the charred building to finish extinguishing the smoldering timbers.

Two young boys playing with a lighter and gasoline inside the building caused a loud explosion that was heard by residents that alerted them the fire.

The Medford Police department is conducting a follow-up and investigation on the fire. Names of the juveniles cannot be release because of their ages.

(Some may remember the property as the Dean and Jessie Yerian home on south second.)

Grease Fire causes Damage To Medford Home

Medford firefighters responded to a kitchen fire April 29th at 311 North 3rd in Medford when the residents forgot to turn off the burner causing a grease fire in their kitchen, stated Medford fire chief Dennis Brittain Wednesday morning.

“When our department arrived Medford police officer Jeremy Biggs had already responded in his patrol car which was equipped with a fire extinguisher and had the fire almost out.” said Brittain.

“An interesting note to this is, said Brittain, Biggs had came into the office a month ago and asked for a fire extinguisher for his car that prompted the city to start looking and buying extinguishers that we are now selling at the city office. It was one of these extinguishers that were used to help save the home from more extensive smoke and fire damage,” said Brittain.

Truman Stiner of Stiner Electronics Services of Blackwell is pictured installing the new speaker system in downtown Medford. The system was brought with funds raised from the 2007 Poker Run Sept 8th.

FISHING REPORT FOR MAY 7, 2008

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass slow. Catfish slow. Crappie fair jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation normal, water 65 and muddy. Striped bass hybrid fair on live bait and crankbaits. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Chandler: Elevation normal and muddy. Largemouth bass slow. Crappie good to excellent on jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Copan: Elevation normal and murky. Crappie fair on minnow and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Blue catfish are fair on cut shad. Channel catfish are good below the dam on worms and cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Eucha: Elevation slightly above normal level, water 65 and murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish fair on trotlines using cut shad. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 8 ft. above normal, water 62 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits in flooded grass and structure. White bass good up stream in running water. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs around brush piles and structure. Paddlefish good snagging at ChotUeau Bend. Below the dam fishing for white bass is good to excellent on jigs in the tailwaters. Crappie good on jigs and minnows. Catfish good on shad. Paddlefish snagging good on the east and west sides. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 64-70 and murky. Bass being caught on spinnerbaits, jigs and crankbaits from boats and around chuck rock banks. Crappie slow up shallow. Catfish good in the rivers on shad. White bass are being caught jigging spoons in Elk River at 12-25 ft. Paddlefish snagging has slowed. A few are being caught in both rivers but the run is over. Report submitted by Littlefield’s Sporting Goods & Greg Lamb’s Guide Service.

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits on the upper end of lake. Catfish fair on cut bait and stinkbaits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at fishing dock and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hulah: Elevation 6 ft. above normal, water murky. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-15 ft. near submerged structure. Blue catfish good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal and muddy. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs in Little Beaver, Five Fingers, McFadden and Osage coves at 3-10 ft. White bass good on jigs, sassy shads, and in-line-spinnerbaits in Little Beaver, Wolf and Bear creeks. Blue catfish and channel catfish good on cut shad and sunfish in the Pioneer, Bear, and Coon creek areas on juglines and trotlines. Paddlefish snagging fair below the 1,000 ft. marker of Kaw Dam. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Oologah: Elevation 9 ft. above normal and falling, water 60 and muddy. Blue and channel catfish fair drifting flats with shad 10 ft. Blue and flathead catfish fair on live goldfish and shad below the dam. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water stained. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits along rocky shorelines. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on cut shad at 30 ft. Crappie fair on minnows at 5-10 ft. in riprap. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: White bass and striped bass hybrids good on slabs and live shad. Channel catfish fair in channels and off points on cut and live bait. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs off Hwy 15. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Spavinaw: Elevation slightly above normal level, water 65 and muddy. Muddy conditions have slowed fishing, but some nice largemouth bass have been caught on spinnerbaits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Tenkiller: Elevation 12 ft. above normal, water 65 and clearing above Cookson. Largemouth and smallmouth bass slow with some action on spinnerbaits or bass assassins in flooded brush. Catfish hitting on minnows or worms in shallow water. Report by Monte Brooks Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits near riprap and creek channels. Catfish fair on shad and stinkbaits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at brush structure and bridges. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Crappie good in the upper end of the lake on minnows and jigs. Channel catfish fair on cut bait and shad. Walleye good on minnows and night crawlers in deeper holes in upper end of the lake. Striped bass hybrids and white bass good trolling crankbaits along dam and over submerged islands. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

Ft. Supply: Elevation normal, water clear. White bass fair on jigs and spinners along the dam. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows along the jetties in the shallows. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation normal, water 66 and stained to muddy. White bass good on points of south coves and along dam. Crappie good on brush piles. Bass fair on crankbaits, spinnerbaits and Carolina-rigged lizards. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 66 and clear. Catfish good on liver and worms. Bass fair to good on minnows and flies. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Largemouth bass being caught on soft plastics around structure. Crappie good on minnows and jigs in flooded timber. Walleye being caught after dark around islands and off rocky points. North Carson Creek boat ramp is open. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 3 1/2 ft, above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on plastic baits and jigs flipping flooded brush. White bass good around bridges and culverts. Blue catfish fair on shad on shallow flats. Crappie fair on minnows or jigs at 3-10 ft. in culverts and around brush piles. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation normal, water 63. Crappie good on minnows in creek arms. White bass fair trolling crankbaits in the river channel. Catfish good on green sunfish and goldfish. Fishing below the dam still good on jigs and cut bait. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan Counties .

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 75 and clear. Largemouth bass excellent on plastic worms at 3-6 ft. in cattails and weed beds. Channel catfish good on shad and stinkbait at 5-10 ft. along points. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

McGee Creek: Elevation 1 1/2 ft above normal, water 65 and murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on soft plastic lures and crawfish colored crank baits at 4-8 ft. along brush. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Channel catfish fair to good on stinkbait in flooded timber. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Water 59 and clear. Largemouth bass and smallmouth bass good on crankbaits, spinnerbaits, minnows and worms. White bass fair trolling minnows and jigs. Channel catfish good on stinkbait and worms. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs shallow. Walleye fair on minnows and jigs around dark. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation above normal and murky. Bass fair on soft plastics when jigged around flooded roadbeds. Crappie good at the spillway on jigs and minnows. Catfish good on night crawlers around the lake as well as the spillway. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation above normal, water 71 and murky. Largemouth bass good at 2-4 ft. using plastic baits and spinnerbaits fishing the weed and woody shoreline spawning areas. Crappie good at 2-5 ft. using minnows and jigs fishing just off the spawning areas, some fish are still moving in and out of the weed beds. White bass fair on jigs at 10-15 ft. below Webbers Falls and Kerr dams. Blue catfish good on fresh cut shad and worms at 3-10 ft. fishing the windy shorelines with weed or rock cover. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Elevation 2 ft. above normal and clear to murky. Largemouth bass excellent on plastics around points and spinnerbaits that are white with red flecks around timber. White bass excellent up creeks and trolling lake. Blue catfish good to excellent on cut bait and shrimp on juglines and trotlines and around islands and in flooded fields. Flathead catfish good to excellent on trotlines and juglines with small baitfish. Crappie excellent around bridges and rush piles on minnows. Walleye fair trolling islands. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water 65 and clear south and murky north. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on spinnerbaits and jig combination baits from platter flats south. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait and sassy shad near the islands. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on live bait and cut baits from the railroad bridge north. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs at Widow Moore Creek and the north and south dikes. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 15 ft .above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastic baits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs below dam. White bass excellent below the dam. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad below the dam. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 2 1/3 ft. below normal and rising. Recent high winds has limited fishing. Crappie poor. Walleye are improving to good-tend to be small. Striped bass hybrids fair to good-also tending to be small. White bass good. Blue catfish good to very good around the old fish-o-rama. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal and murky. Crappie slow to fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish fair to good on cut bait in creeks. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County

Foss: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal. Walleye fair along rocks on dam with live bait. Striped bass hybrids fair with live bait and white or chartreuse jigs. White bass slow. Catfish good with Danny King stinkbait. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: Elevation 1/4 ft. above normal. Catfish fair on cut baits. Saugeye slow to fair on sassy shad and drifting night crawlers. Striped bass hybrids and white bass slow to fair on sassy shad. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County .

Lawtonka: Elevation above normal and clear. Crappie fair to good off rocks around the dam on minnows. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Tom Steed: Elevation normal, water 64. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on minnows and jigs off the old highway. Report submitted by David Smith, game warden stationed in Kiowa County .

Waurika: Elevation normal, water 65 and murky. White bass being caught on artificial baits and live baits. Catfish being caught on juglines and rod and reel on live bait and punch bait. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around Walker Creek Bridge and Wichita Ridge. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County .

Mesonet Statistical Data for Medford, Oklahoma.

These values represent statistics for the day in progress.

They do NOT represent final daily values.

Statistical data for Medford: May 7, 2008 ( since 1:00 am CDT)

Class Parameter Value Time (CDT)

Air Temperature Maximum Temperature 67 F 6:35 am

Minimum Temperature 60 F 8:05 am

Average Temperature 62 F

Dewpoint Temperature Maximum Dewpoint Temperature 66 F 6:35 am

Minimum Dewpoint Temperature 57 F 7:25 am

Average Dewpoint Temperature 60 F

Relative Humidity Maximum Relative Humidity 97 % 7:00 pm

Minimum Relative Humidity 85 % 1:45 pm

Average Relative Humidity 93 %

10 cm Soil Temperature (sod) Maximum TS10 Soil Temperature 67 F 1:15 am

Minimum TS10 Soil Temperature 63 F 10:00 pm

Average TS10 Soil Temperature 65 F

10 cm Soil Temperature (bare) Maximum TB10 Soil Temperature 68 F 1:15 am

Minimum TB10 Soil Temperature 63 F 10:00 pm

Average TB10 Soil Temperature 65 F

Barometric Pressure Maximum Barometric Pressure 28.60 in 1:05 am

Minimum Barometric Pressure 28.40 in 4:45 pm

Average Barometric Pressure 28.48 in

Wind Speed Maximum Wind Speed 40 mph 7:05 am

Average Wind Speed 9 mph

Wind Direction Prevailing Wind Direction NNE (24%)

Secondary Wind Direction ENE (14%)

Rainfall Rainfall 1.10 in

Solar Radiation Maximum Solar Radiation 598 W/m2 1:05 pm

Total Solar Radiation 3.8 MJ/m2

1 teaspoon prepared horseradish

1 teaspoon dry mustard

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon pepper

1 pound ground beef, moistened

1/2 onion, finely chopped

1 egg

2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce

1 cup bread crumbs

1 cup ketchup

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a small bowl, mix together the horseradish, mustard, salt, and pepper. Set aside.

In large bowl, mix ground beef, onion, egg, and Worcestershire sauce. Add contents of small bowl and mix thoroughly. Add the bread crumbs and combine well.

Place mixture into a 1-pound loaf pan. Pour ketchup over top and place in oven.

Mesonet Statistical Data for Medford, Oklahoma.

These values represent statistics for the day in progress.

They do NOT represent final daily values.

Statistical data for Medford: May 6, 2008 ( since 1:00 am CDT)

Class Parameter Value Time (CDT)

Air Temperature Maximum Temperature 74 F 12:25 pm

Minimum Temperature 58 F 5:25 am

Average Temperature 63 F

Dewpoint Temperature Maximum Dewpoint Temperature 64 F 10:50 am

Minimum Dewpoint Temperature 58 F 5:25 am

Average Dewpoint Temperature 61 F

Relative Humidity Maximum Relative Humidity 97 % 5:35 am

Minimum Relative Humidity 71 % 12:30 pm

Average Relative Humidity 92 %

10 cm Soil Temperature (sod) Maximum TS10 Soil Temperature 65 F 1:15 am

Minimum TS10 Soil Temperature 62 F 8:00 am

Average TS10 Soil Temperature 63 F

10 cm Soil Temperature (bare) Maximum TB10 Soil Temperature 68 F 1:15 am

Minimum TB10 Soil Temperature 64 F 8:45 am

Average TB10 Soil Temperature 66 F

Barometric Pressure Maximum Barometric Pressure 28.85 in 3:05 am

Minimum Barometric Pressure 28.71 in 7:05 am

Average Barometric Pressure 28.75 in

Wind Speed Maximum Wind Speed 19 mph 6:20 am

Average Wind Speed 8 mph

Wind Direction Prevailing Wind Direction SSE (53%)

Secondary Wind Direction S (11%)

Rainfall Rainfall 0.44 in

Solar Radiation Maximum Solar Radiation 992 W/m2 12:20 pm

Total Solar Radiation 5.7 MJ/m2

Teachers Lounge 301 N. Main

Medford, Oklahoma 73759

Posted this 5 day of May, 2008, at 3:15 p.m. at the main office entrance, cafeteria doors and workroom to the Medford School building and the school website.

Posted by Gloria Gonzales. Deputy Clerk

(NOTE: The Medford Board of Education may discuss, vote to approve, vote to disapprove, vote to table or decide not to vote on any item on this agenda)

Call to order and recording of members present and absent to establish a quorum

Consent Agenda:

All of the following items, which concern reports and items of a routine nature normally approved at a board meeting, will be approved by one board vote, unless any board member desires to have a separate vote on any or all of these items. The consent agenda consists of the discussion, consideration, and approval of the following items:

Approve, or disapprove, with corrections minutes of the April 7, 2008 regular meeting and the April 11, 2008 special meeting.

Approval of monthly financial reports ending May 2, 2008.

i. Treasurer’s cash balance report

ii. Encumbrance and warrant registers in the general and building funds

iii. School activity fund monthly summary

Teachers report

Principals report

Superintendents report

Discussion, motion and possible action on the employment of support staff as listed on Exhibit “A” for 2008-2009.

Discussion, motion, and possible action to employ a HS Softball coach for the 2008-2009 school year.

Discussion, motion, and possible action to employ a Para-Professional for the 2008-2009 school year and for the 2008 summer school session pending the passing of the Para-Professional exam.

Discussion, motion, and possible action on summer employees as listed on Exhibit “B” for 2007.

Discussion, motion, and possible action on extra-duty assignments 2008-2009.

Discussion, motion, and possible action on the Title I Site Plan for 2008-2009.

Discussion, motion, and possible action on the Alternative Education Plan for 2008-2009.

Discussion, motion, and possible action on the Professional Development Plan for 2008-2009.

Discussion, motion, and possible action on admission prices to athletic contests for 2008-2009.

Discussion, motion, and possible action on temporary appropriations for 2008-2009.

Vote on any open transfer requests for the 2008-2009 school year.

Vote to accept any resignations given to date.

Vote to contract with Hedges for a speech pathologist for summer services.

New Business – Item(s) that were unknown about at the time agenda was posted.

Vote to adjourn.

FISHING REPORT FOR APRIL 30, 2008

CENTRAL

Thunderbird: Elevation 3 ft. above normal and murky. Saugeye fair to good on jigs off points. Crappie beginning to move up to shallow water to spawn, but are just not there yet. Some are being caught on minnows and jigs on structure at 4-5 ft. White bass good on jigs and in-line spinnerbaits off points and trolling. Largemouth bass good on tandem spinnerbaits in shallow areas of warmer water around structure. Catfish slow. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation above normal and murky. Largemouth bass slow. Blue catfish slow. Crappie good jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation normal, water 65 and muddy. Striped bass hybrid fair on live bait and crankbaits. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Chandler: Elevation above normal and muddy. Largemouth bass slow. Crappie good on jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Copan: Elevation 3 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Blue catfish fair on cut shad. Channel catfish good on worms and cut shad in flooded areas and below the dam. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Eucha: Elevation slightly above normal, water murky on the upper end and muddy on the lower end. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 16 ft. above normal, water 60 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits. White bass good up creeks and in moving water. Channel catfish good on cut bait, shad, worms and livers in flooded mud flats. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand-upper end: Elevation above normal and dropping, water 64 and clearing. Largemouth bass good on dark colored plastic worms shallow along shoreline. White bass and crappie fair to good on minnows, spinnerbaits and jigs with power baits in Elk River . Channel, blue and flathead catfish good on brooders, shad and stinkbaits at 30-40 ft. Paddlefish slow, smaller fish are being caught. Report submitted by Sam Williams, Grand Lake Sports Center .

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits along shoreline, creek channels and brush. Catfish good on cut baits and stinkbaits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at fishing dock and brush. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hulah: Elevation 11 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Blue catfish fair on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 11 1/2 ft. above normal, water 62 and murky. Blue catfish good on cut shad on rod and reel, juglines and trotlines from Coon Creek to Trader's Bend in the Arkansas River . Catfish fair on minnows and jigs at 4-10 ft. in Little Beaver and Big Beaver Creeks. White bass good in Little Beaver Creek and below Kaw Dam. Paddlefish snagging fair below the dam. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Oologah: Elevation 13 1/2 ft. above normal, water 60 and muddy. Channel catfish good on worms and dough baits fishing around flooded willows and flooded fields. Blue catfish fair on shad using juglines on flats in upper end of the lake at 10 ft. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around flooded trees at 5-8 ft. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water stained. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits along points. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on white sassy shad and rooster tails along dam. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 5-10 ft. along riprap. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: White bass fair on live shad and slabs in the main lake. Catfish fair on cut and live bait in channels and off points. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs off Hwy. 15 and Hwy 177. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Spavinaw: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 63 and muddy. Muddy conditions have slowed fishing, but some crappie being caught in the dam area. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Webbers Falls: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits, crankbaits and jigs in creek channels and riprap. Catfish good on cut baits and stinkbaits on bottom in creek channels. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around bridges and brush. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County

NOTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Striped bass hybrids good on live bait from the beach to Longdale landing. Walleye good on minnows and crankbaits in the upper end of the lake. Crappie good on minnows and jigs in upper end of the lake. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

Ft. Supply: Elevation normal, water clear. White bass fair on jigs and spinnerbaits below the dam. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation normal, water 65 and stained to muddy. Crappie good off brush piles in coves. White bass along dam and in south coves. Bass fair using spinnerbaits, crankbaits and Carolina rigged lizards Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 62 and clear. Bass fair on minnows and flies. Catfish fair to good on liver and worms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Largemouth bass being caught on soft plastics around structure. Crappie good on minnows and jigs in flooded timber. Walleye being caught after dark around islands and off rocky points. North Carson Creek boat ramp is open. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 7 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits in flooded timber. White bass good on jigs along the dam. Blue catfish fair on shad in shallow flats. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 4-8 ft. around brush and bridge areas. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation 7 ft. above normal, water 63. Crappie and bass fair to good with minnows and jigs along flooded brush. Blue catfish and crappie good in the tailwaters. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan Counties .

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 73 and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic worms along weed beds and in cattails at 3-5 ft. Channel catfish good on chicken liver and shad in the discharge canal at 15 ft. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

McGee Creek: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water 64 degrees and murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on soft plastic lures and crawfish colored crankbaits at 4-8 ft. along brush. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Channel catfish fair to good on stinkbait in flooded timber. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Elevation normal, water 60 and stained. Largemouth bass excellent on spinnerbaits, crankbaits and soft plastic jerk baits. White bass fair on jigs and minnows and trolling with crankbaits early and late. Catfish fair on stinkbait and worms. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs in shallow water. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation above normal and murky. Bass fair on crankbaits. Crappie fair in flooded timber and great at the spillway on jigs and minnows. Catfish fair at the spillway. Anglers should use caution. Lake is elevated and many structures could be hidden. Many boat ramps are closed also. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation above normal, water 68 and murky. Largemouth bass good on plastic baits at 1-4 ft. in spawning areas. Crappie fair to good on minnows at 1-3 ft. along the weed beds. White bass slow. Blue catfish good on fresh cut bait and worms at 3-10 ft. along the windy shorelines. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Elevation 2 ft. above normal and clear to murky. Largemouth bass excellent on plastics around points and white with red flecks spinnerbaits around timber. White bass excellent up creeks and trolling lake. Blue catfish good to excellent on cut bait and shrimp on juglines and trotlines and around islands and in flooded fields. Flathead catfish good to excellent on small baitfish on trotlines and juglines. Crappie excellent around bridges and rush piles on minnows. Walleye fair trolling islands. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation 5 ft. above normal, water 62 and clear south and murky north. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on spinnerbaits south end of lake. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait and sassy shad from catfish bay south. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on live bait, cut shad and worms from Platter flats north. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs around underwater structures and brush piles. All other fishing is slow. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 24 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastic baits. Crappie good with minnows and jigs below dam. Channel and blue catfish good on shad below the dam. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 2 ft. below normal and rising slowly. Crappie poor. Walleye fair to good. Striped bass hybrids fair to good. White bass fair to good. Blue catfish good to very good around the old fish-o-rama. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal with 3 floodgates open. Catfish fair on cut bait. Walleye fair on jigs behind the dam. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County

Foss: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water 65 and clear. Gates closed. Walleye fair on live bait along dam on points. Striped bass hybrids fair on white and chartreuse jigs. Catfish slow. Crappie fair around fish house. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water stained. Striped bass hybrids and white bass slow to fair on sassy shad. Crappie slow on jigs and minnows around docks. Saugeye slow on night crawlers and sassy shad. Catfish slow to fair on cut baits. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County .

Lawtonka: Elevation above normal with 1 floodgate open. Crappie good at the dam on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Tom Steed: Elevation normal, water 64. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on minnows and jigs off the old highway. Report submitted by David Smith, game warden stationed in Kiowa County .

Waurika: Elevation normal, water 65 and murky. White bass being caught on artificial baits and live baits. Catfish being caught on juglines and rod and reel on live bait and punch bait. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around Walker Creek Bridge and Wichita Ridge. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County .

2 are arrested in connection with attempt at ATM theft

Two men were arrested in connection with second degree burglary early Saturday morning after police responded to an alarm at an ATM on West Willow, ac-cording to an Enid Police Department report.

Weston Dent, 28, of Wakita, and Jared Wheel-er, 26, of Enid, were arrested but not before they tried to run from police, the report states.

Enid police responded to an alarm shortly after 2 a.m. Saturday at First National Bank of Pond Creek ATM, 2132 W. Willow, according to the report.

When an officer ar-rived, the back door of the business appeared to have been pried open, and two men were standing beside a vehicle, according to police. The two took off when an officer pulled into the parking lot of the business. They later were caught and taken to Garfield County Detention Facility.

New crappie records set, but could be broken again soon

Two recent crappie catches at Texoma and Thunderbird fill spots in the state’s lake record books as well as tip off one of the hottest times of the year to catch crappie.

The Texoma crappie was caught by Edmond angler Charles Cather on a jig and tipped the scales at 2.8 lbs. The Thunderbird crappie was caught April 28 by Shelby Adcock, Moore , and weighed 2.3 lbs. And officials with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation say anglers hoping to catch their own lake record crappie, or even just a mess of fish to serve at the dinner table, may have their best chance now.

“We’re coming into a time of the year when catching a lake record crappie could be easier than ever,” said Greg Summers, fisheries research laboratory supervisor for the Wildlife Department. “But even if you don’t catch a record, you can certainly catch high numbers of fish, and you can do it without a boat and with simple tackle.”

Summers is referring to annual the spawning activity of crappie, when they move to shallow waters — usually only two to three feet deep. Naturally, this activity makes the shallows along banks an excellent place for anglers to target the highly sought after fish as well to introduce youngsters to the sport of fishing.

“All anglers really need for bait this time of year for crappie fishing is a handful of jigs or minnows,” Summers said.

Anglers hoping to score on crappie this time of year should concentrate on brush and rocky structure in shallow water. Anglers know crappie will bite a variety of bait, are easily accessible from the bank and make excellent tablefare.

For a complete list of regulations, anglers should consult to the current “Oklahoma Fishing Guide” or log on to wildlifedepartment.com.

The Web site also offers more information about the lake record crappie and the Wildlife Department’s Lake Record Fish Program. Through an easily-operated search feature, visitors to the site can view a wealth of lake record fish information, ranging from the size of record fish caught to what kind of bait or rod and reel was used to catch them.

Lakes included in the program include Arbuckle, Broken Bow, Canton , Eufaula, Ft. Cobb , Grand, Kaw, Keystone, Sardis , Skiatook, Tenkiller, Texoma and Thunderbird.

Species eligible for spots in the lake records book include blue, channel and flathead catfish and largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass in addition to crappie, paddlefish, striped bass, striped bass hybrids, sunfish (combined) walleye/saugeye and white bass. Minimum weights are set for each species are detailed on the Wildlife Department’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com.

Anglers who catch a potential record from a participating lake should contact designated business locations around the lake that are enrolled as lake record keepers. A listing of official lake record keepers is available on wildlifedepartment.com.

Once it has been determined that an angler has landed a record fish, the media is notified and the public will be able to view information about the catch on the Wildlife Department’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com.

All past and current state record fish are registered in the Lake Record Fish Program as records for their respective lakes.

To see the complete database of all lake record fish caught, or to learn more about the Lake Record Fish program, log on to the Wildlife Department’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com.

FISHING REPORT FOR APRIL 30, 2008

CENTRAL

Thunderbird: Elevation 3 ft. above normal and murky. Saugeye fair to good on jigs off points. Crappie beginning to move up to shallow water to spawn. Some are being caught on minnows and jigs on structure at 4-5 ft. White bass good on jigs and in-line spinnerbaits off points and trolling. Largemouth bass good on tandem spinnerbaits in shallow areas of warmer water around structure. Catfish slow. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation above normal and murky. Largemouth bass slow. Blue catfish slow. Crappie good jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation normal, water 65 and muddy. Striped bass hybrid fair on live bait and crankbaits. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Chandler : Elevation above normal and muddy. Largemouth bass slow. Crappie good on jigs. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Copan : Elevation 3 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Blue catfish fair on cut shad. Channel catfish good on worms and cut shad in flooded areas and below the dam. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Eucha: Elevation slightly above normal, water murky on the upper end and muddy on the lower end. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Ft. Gibson : Elevation 16 ft. above normal, water 60 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits. White bass good up creeks and in moving water. Channel catfish good on cut bait, shad, worms and livers in flooded mud flats. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: In the upper end, elevation is above normal and dropping, water 64 and clearing. Largemouth bass good on dark-colored plastic worms shallow along shoreline. White bass and crappie fair to good on minnows, spinnerbaits and jigs with power baits in Elk River . Channel, blue and flathead catfish good on brooders, shad and stinkbaits at 30-40 ft. Paddlefish slow; smaller fish are being caught. Report submitted by Sam Williams, Grand Lake Sports Center .

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits along shoreline, creek channels and brush. Catfish good on cut baits and stinkbaits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at fishing dock and brush. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hulah: Elevation 11 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Blue catfish fair on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 11 1/2 ft. above normal, water 62 and murky. Blue catfish good on cut shad on rod and reel, juglines and trotlines from Coon Creek to Trader's Bend in the Arkansas River . Catfish fair on minnows and jigs at 4-10 ft. in Little Beaver and Big Beaver Creeks. White bass good in Little Beaver Creek and below Kaw Dam. Paddlefish snagging fair below the dam. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Oologah: Elevation 13 1/2 ft. above normal, water 60 and muddy. Channel catfish good on worms and dough baits fishing around flooded willows and flooded fields. Blue catfish fair on shad using juglines on flats in upper end of the lake at 10 ft. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around flooded trees at 5-8 ft. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water stained. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits along points. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on white sassy shad and roostertails along dam. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 5-10 ft. along riprap. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: White bass fair on live shad and slabs in the main lake. Catfish fair on cut and live bait in channels and off points. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs off Hwy. 15 and Hwy 177. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Spavinaw: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 63 and muddy. Muddy conditions have slowed fishing, but some crappie being caught in the dam area. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries.

Webbers Falls: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits, crankbaits and jigs in creek channels and riprap. Catfish good on cut baits and stinkbaits on bottom in creek channels. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around bridges and brush. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County

NOTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Striped bass hybrids good on live bait from the beach to Longdale landing. Walleye good on minnows and crankbaits in the upper end of the lake. Crappie good on minnows and jigs in upper end of the lake. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County.

Ft. Supply: Elevation normal, water clear. White bass fair on jigs and spinnerbaits below the dam. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County.

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation normal, water 65 and stained to muddy. Crappie good off brush piles in coves. White bass biting along dam and in south coves. Bass fair using spinnerbaits, crankbaits and Carolina-rigged lizards. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 62 and clear. Bass fair on minnows and flies. Catfish fair to good on liver and worms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Largemouth bass being caught on soft plastics around structure. Crappie good on minnows and jigs in flooded timber. Walleye being caught after dark around islands and off rocky points. North Carson Creek boat ramp is open. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Eufaula: Elevation 7 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits in flooded timber. White bass good on jigs along the dam. Blue catfish fair on shad in shallow flats. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 4-8 ft. around brush and bridge areas. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County.

Hugo: Elevation 7 ft. above normal, water 63. Crappie and bass fair to good with minnows and jigs along flooded brush. Blue catfish and crappie good in the tailwaters. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan Counties.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 73 and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic worms along weed beds and in cattails at 3-5 ft. Channel catfish good on chicken liver and shad in the discharge canal at 15 ft. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County.

McGee Creek: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water 64 degrees and murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on soft plastic lures and crawfish-colored crankbaits at 4-8 ft. along brush. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Channel catfish fair to good on stinkbait in flooded timber. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County.

Murray: Elevation normal, water 60 and stained. Largemouth bass excellent on spinnerbaits, crankbaits and soft plastic jerk baits. White bass fair on jigs and minnows and trolling with crankbaits early and late. Catfish fair on stinkbait and worms. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs in shallow water. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County.

Pine Creek: Elevation above normal and murky. Bass fair on crankbaits. Crappie fair in flooded timber and great at the spillway on jigs and minnows. Catfish fair at the spillway. Anglers should use caution. Lake is elevated, and many structures could be hidden. Many boat ramps are closed also. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation above normal, water 68 and murky. Largemouth bass good on plastic baits at 1-4 ft. in spawning areas. Crappie fair to good on minnows at 1-3 ft. along the weed beds. White bass slow. Blue catfish good on fresh cut bait and worms at 3-10 ft. along the windy shorelines. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County.

Sardis Lake: Elevation 2 ft. above normal and clear to murky. Largemouth bass excellent on plastics around points and white spinnerbaits with red flecks around timber. White bass excellent up creeks and trolling lake. Blue catfish good to excellent on cut bait and shrimp on juglines and trotlines and around islands and in flooded fields. Flathead catfish good to excellent on small baitfish on trotlines and juglines. Crappie excellent around bridges and brush piles on minnows. Walleye fair trolling islands. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County.

Texoma: Elevation 5 ft. above normal, water 62 and clear south and murky north. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on spinnerbaits south end of lake. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait and sassy shad from catfish bay south. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on live bait, cut shad and worms from Platter Flats north. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs around underwater structures and brush piles. All other fishing is slow. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County.

Wister: Elevation 24 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastic baits. Crappie good with minnows and jigs below dam. Channel and blue catfish good on shad below the dam. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County.

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 2 ft. below normal and rising slowly. Crappie poor. Walleye fair to good. Striped bass hybrids fair to good. White bass fair to good. Blue catfish good to very good around the old fish-o-rama. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park.

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal with three floodgates open. Catfish fair on cut bait. Walleye fair on jigs behind the dam. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County

Foss: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water 65 and clear. Gates closed. Walleye fair on live bait along dam on points. Striped bass hybrids fair on white and chartreuse jigs. Catfish slow. Crappie fair around fish house. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water stained. Striped bass hybrids and white bass slow to fair on sassy shad. Crappie slow on jigs and minnows around docks. Saugeye slow on night crawlers and sassy shad. Catfish slow to fair on cut baits. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County.

Lawtonka: Elevation above normal with one floodgate open. Crappie good at the dam on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County.

Tom Steed: Elevation normal, water 64. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on minnows and jigs off the old highway. Report submitted by David Smith, game warden stationed in Kiowa County.

Waurika: Elevation normal, water 65 and murky. White bass being caught on artificial baits and live baits. Catfish being caught on juglines and rod and reel on live bait and punch bait. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around Walker Creek Bridge and Wichita Ridge. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County.

A FATALITY COLLISION OCCURRED AT 1710 HOURS ON 05/03/08, TWO MILES EAST AND

FIVE AND ONE-HALF MILES NORTH OF BURLINGTON ON COUNTY ROAD IN

ALFALFA COUNTY

A 1998 WINDSTAR VAN DRIVEN BY HELENA PETERS, 13,

THE ADDRESS WAS LISTED AS BURLINGTON. PERERS WAS TRANSPORTED BY ALFALFA COUNTY E.M.S. TO

KIOWA DISTRICT HOSPITAL IN KIOWA, KANSAS. PRONOUNCED DEAD ON ARRIVAL

OF MASSIVE INJURIES.

THE OHP REPORT STATED THAT THE VAN PETERS WAS DRIVING WAS NORTHBOUND ON COUNTY ROAD AT A HIGH

RATE OF SPEED, RAN OFF RIGHT SIDE OF ROADWAY, ROLLED 2 AND 1/4 TIMES

COMING TO REST ON DRIVER'S SIDE. THE REPORT STATED PETERS WAS EJECTED OUT REAR OF VEHICLE.

SEATBELTS WERE EQUIPPED BUT NOT IN USE BY DRIVER, ACCORDING TO THE ACCIDENT REPORT.

THE CAUSE OF THE ACCIDENT WAS LISTED AS UNSAFE SPEED FOR TYPE OF ROADWY.

THE ACCIDENT WAS INVESTIGATED BY TROOPER KEN JORDAN #724 OF ALFALFA COUNTY DETACHMENT.

ASSISTED BY TROOPERS COLE PATTERSON #599 AND LINDA HARTLEY #340,

LT TONY LUCERO #106, KHP TROOPER BRIAN QUICK, ALFALFA COUNTY E.M.S. AND

SHERIFF'S OFFICE AND BURLINGTON RESCUE.

Make the most of your meetings

The public is invited to hear Dana Baldwin, extension educator from Major County speak about making the most of your meetings on Thursday May 15 at 10:00 am. The educational lesson will be held at the Grant County OSU Cooperative Extension Office Grant County OSU Cooperative Extension Office at 112 E. Guthrie Room 301 Courthouse Medford, Oklahoma. For more information or to request copies of the printed handout contact Robyn Rapp, extension educator at 580-395-2134 or robyn.rapp@okstate.edu

Tractor Training

A program to certify 14 and 15 year old youth for safe tractor and machinery operation will be held May 28, 29 and 30, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Grant County Commissioners’ District #2 Training Room, 524 North Front Street in Medford.

Cost of the program is $30 which will include lunch, refreshments and study materials. Registration by Monday, May 19 is required. Contact your Grant County OSU Extension Center at 580‑395-2134 with student’s name, phone number and address

Grant County 4-H Fashion Revue and Impressive Dress

Grant County 4-H held their Fashion Revue and Impressive Dress contest recently at the Wakita Bi Centennial building. Fashion Revue garments are sewn by the 4-H’er according to guidelines set out in 4-H literature. The purpose of the Impressive Dress contest is to acquaint members with selecting appropriate dress for various activities and events. Garments may be purchased or constructed for this contest.

Fashion Revue: advanced special occasion garment: Lexy Rapp, 1st and Champion; advanced polar fleece garment: Abbey Kilian, 1st and Reserve Champion. Impressive Dress: Advanced girls casual wear: 1st Karyssa Childress; Lexy Childress; Lexy Rapp. Advanced girls active sportswear: 1st Jennifer George; blue - Lexy Rapp; Advanced girls dress wear: Lexy Childress; 1st Abbey Kilian; blue - Lexy Rapp; blue - Jennifer George; blue – Karyssa Childress; blue – Lexy Childress. Advanced Girls Champion: Abbey Kilian; Advanced Girls Reserve Champion: Lexy Childress. Advanced boys casual wear: 1st Russell Rapp; Advanced boys dress wear: 1st - Russell Rapp; Advanced Boys Champion: Russell Rapp. Intermediate girls casual wear: 1st Kathryn Yunker; blue - Elizabeth Elliot, blue - Ashley Sellers; Intermediate girls dress wear: 1st Kathryn Yunker; blue - Ashley Sellers; blue - Elizabeth Elliot; Fun event: Lexy Rapp. Intermediate Girls Champion: Kathryn Yunker; Intermediate Girls Reserve Champion: Elizabeth Elliot.

The Oklahoma Lottery has contributed more than $187 million to Oklahoma Education. It has also collected millions in state and federal taxes and thousands in debts owed to the state.

Since its launch in 2005 through mid-April 2008, the Oklahoma Lottery has withheld more than $5 million in state taxes and almost $32 million in federal taxes on prizes.

In cooperation with the Oklahoma Department of Human Services and the Oklahoma Tax Commission, the Oklahoma Lottery checks on every winner over $601 to determine if they owe child support or tax debt. If the winner is found to have a debt, the amount owed and the taxes on the prize are deducted from the prize value and the remainder of the cash, if any, is awarded. More than $86,000 has been collected in child support and since July 2007 more than $10,000 in tax debts.

In addition, the Lottery has paid more than $35 million in compensation to lottery retailers.

Net proceeds of all Lottery games are used to support improvements and enhancements for Oklahoma education. More than $187 million has been contributed to education since November 2005.

Proceeds are used statewide to supplement existing funds for a variety of important education purposes, including: teacher compensation and benefits, early childhood development programs, college scholarships, classroom technology and construction of educational facilities.

The state could soon be getting a boost in funds dedicated to the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges, following the Senate approval of House Bill 2551 on Wednesday.

The measure would remove language requiring the State Board of Equalization to certify three percent growth in the General Revenue Fund before appropriating $50 million to the Rebuilding Oklahoma Access and Driver Safety (ROADS) Fund.

Sen. Kenneth Corn, Senate author of the bill, said approval of the measure would complete a funding commitment to the Department of Transportation as part of an eight-year plan to improve the state's roads and bridges.

"Making a firm commitment to provide increased funding for road and bridge improvements is a step in the right direction for our state," said Corn, D-Poteau. "For Oklahoma to become a destination for business and industry, we must make significant improvements to our transportation infrastructure. It's time for the Legislature to get serious about rebuilding our roads."

When the ROADS Fund was established in 2005, the legislation provided for annual funding increases of $50 million as long as state revenues grew by a rate of three percent each year. Removing the trigger would allow the Legislature to provide increases in funding independent of growth projections.

Corn said that each year since the fund was established, the three percent growth trigger has prevented annual funding increases.

"Today's unanimous passage is a signal that the Senate understands our roads and bridges must be among our top priorities," Corn said. "We have a long way to go but this is a another step in the right direction."

The Grant County Sheriff’s Reserve officers met on April 25 at 7 p.m. for their regular meeting and election of officers.

Lamont chief of police Sim Warrior and Capt Juhl convened the meeting and after a brief treasurers report by Latasha Jennings, the election of new officers for the next 2 years were held, new officers are; Captain Latasha Jennings, Lieutenant Chris Ferrell, Sec/Treas Mike Payne.

Prior to the election of officers, Capt Juhl stated due to additional commitments with the city of Medford’s ambulance service, he would not seek or accept any office. He wanted to thank everyone for their support during his tenure.

Attending the meeting were Capt Alan Juhl, Latasha Jennings, Merble and Carol Bellin, Chris Ferrell, Mike Payne, Sim warrior and Sheriff Roland Hula.

Capt Jennings scheduled the next meeting for May 14th at 7 p.m.

FISHING REPORT FOR APRIL 23, 2008

CENTRAL

Arcadia : Elevation normal. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits. White bass good. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad. Crappie good at heated docks. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Hefner: Elevation below normal, water murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits. White bass good. Channel catfish good on cut shad. Crappie good on the dam. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Overholser: Elevation normal, water murky. White bass good on 2 in. white grubs and minnows. Striped bass hybrids good on 2 in. white grubs. Channel catfish good on cut shad. Crappie good on minnows and jigs on the rocks. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation above normal and murky. Channel catfish fair on dough bait. Crappie fair on minnows. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 57 and muddy. Striped bass hybrids good on cut baits and live baits. Crappie good on jigs in shallow water. Saugeye fair on crankbaits around docks. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Copan : Elevation 6 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie good on minnow and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Blue catfish good on cut shad. Channel catfish good in flooded areas on worms. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Eucha: Elevation slightly above normal, water 61 and murky. The upper end of the lake is slowly clearing while the lower end continues to be muddy. Largemouth bass have been active on spinnerbaits and crankbaits. White bass good on the upper end. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Grand: North end - elevation above normal, water 58-64 and murky to muddy, clearing in Elk River . Largemouth bass fair to good on crankbaits and jigs at 8-10 ft. Channel, blue and flathead catfish good on shad, worms, brooders and goldfish at all depths. Paddlefish slow, with mainly smaller fish being caught. Report submitted by Sam Williams, Grand Lake Sports Center .

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits and spinnerbaits along shoreline and creek channels. Catfish good on stinkbaits and cut baits on bottom. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at fishing dock and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hudson : Elevation above normal. White bass fair to good on small lures in creeks. Paddlefish snagging good in the upper end of the lake. Report submitted by Steve Loveland, game warden stationed in Mayes and Rogers counties.

Hulah: Elevation 13 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15ft. Blue catfish good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 12 ft. above normal and murky. White bass excellent on in-line spinnerbaits and sassy shad in the upper portions of Little and Big Beaver Creeks. Channel and blue catfish good in the Bear Creek flats on juglines and trotlines at 5-14 ft. using fresh cut shad for bait. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs in flooded brush and timber areas of the major creeks and on the Washunga Bay riprap. Paddlefish snagging is very slow below the dam due to lack of released water. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Keystone: Elevation 16 ft. above normal, water muddy. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits, jigs and chunkbaits at 3-6 ft. in back of coves with flooded cover. Smallmouth bass slow on crankbaits at 8-12 ft. around points. Spotted bass slow on rattletraps at 4-8 ft. around points. White bass fair on minnows and tube jigs at 3-8 ft. in creeks and below the dam. Striped bass fair on buck tails and sassy shad at 3-8 ft. below the dam. Channel catfish good on worms at 5-10 ft. in back of coves and creeks. Blue catfish good on cut shad at 5-10 ft. below the dam and in the mouths of creeks. Flathead catfish good on goldfish and large shiners at 5-10 ft. below the dam and in riprap areas. Crappie fair on minnows and bright-colored jigs at 4-10 ft. below the dam and along riprap across creeks. Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Oologah: Elevation 13 1/2 ft. above normal, water 60 and muddy. Channel catfish good on worms and dough baits fishing around flooded willows and flooded fields. Blue catfish fair on shad using juglines on flats in upper end of the lake at 10 ft. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around flooded trees at 5-8 ft. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 5 ft. above normal, water clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits along windy points on the lower half of the lake. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair in open water. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-20 ft. around structure. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Spavinaw: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 60 and muddy. Muddy conditions have slowed fishing. Largemouth bass being caught on spinnerbaits with Colorado blades. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Tenkiller: Elevation 20 ft. above normal, water 60-62 and steady. Smallmouth bass good off creek banks on small plastic worms on jig heads. White bass fair in creeks on spinners or spoons. Report by Monte Brooks Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls : Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits and spinnerbaits along riprap, creek channels and rocky points. Catfish good on stinkbaits and cut baits on bottom. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at brush structure at bridges and along shoreline. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NOTHWEST

Ft. Supply : Elevation normal, water clear. Walleye fair on jigs and minnows below dam. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle : Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 61 and stained to muddy. Crappie good on small jigs in most coves. White bass being caught up Guy Sandy hitting rattletraps. Bass being caught in coves using jerk baits, spinnerbaits and Texas-rigged lizards. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River : Elevation normal, water 65 and clear. Bas fair on minnows and flies. Catfish fair to good on liver and worms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Elevation 22 ft. above normal. Largemouth bass good on worms, plastics and crankbaits. Catfish good on juglines and trotlines baited with sunfish. Crappie being caught around structure. The only open boat ramp is south of Smithville at the narrows. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 9 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits flipping into flooded timber. White bass good on jigs below the dam. Blue catfish fair on shad in shallow flats. Crappie fair on minnows or jigs at 4-10 ft. in deeper brushy areas. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation 10 ft. above normal, water 61. Crappie fair to good on minnows at 6-10 ft. Largemouth bass fair on plastics in flooded vegetation. Crappie and blue catfish good on jigs below the dam. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan Counties .

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 73 and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic worms at 5-8 ft. in weed beds. White bass and hybrid striped bass fair on crankbaits at 8-10 ft. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

McGee Creek: Elevation 8 ft. above normal, water 62 and murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on soft plastic lures and crawfish-colored crankbaits at 6-12 ft. along brush. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Channel catfish fair to good on stinkbait in flooded timber. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray : Water 54 and clear. Largemouth bass excellent on soft plastic baits, crankbaits and jerk baits in shallow water. Channel catfish fair on worms, minnows and stinkbaits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs in shallow water. Walleye good on minnows, jigs and soft crankbaits around the dam. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation above normal and murky. Bass good on crankbaits in submerged road beds. Crappie fair in flooded timber and great at the spillway on jigs. Catfish being caught on night crawlers around Turkey Creek and in the upper river channel. Lake is elevated and many structures could be hidden. Many boat ramps are closed also. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water 66 and murky. Largemouth bass good on plastic baits at 1-3 ft. in the weed and rocky spawning areas. Crappie good on minnows at 1 ft. in the weed and stumpy spawning areas. White bass fair on jigs below Webbers Falls and Kerr dams. Blue catfish good on fresh cut bait and worms at 3-10 ft. in the rocky and weedy areas the wind has stirred up. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake : Elevation 5 ft. above normal and muddy. Bass fair on plastics around shallow structure at 2-3 ft. White bass fair in creek channels using plastic bait and yellow and white grubs. Catfish excellent on worms in flooded fields. Crappie fair on minnows around brush piles, tower and bridges. Walleye fair trolling islands. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation 6 ft. above normal, water 60 and clear south and murky north. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on combination baits on the south half of the lake. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait and sassy shade on the south half of lake. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on live bait and cut baits from Platter flats north. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs in Widow Moore and upper Rock Creeks. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 24 1/2 ft. above normal, water is 3 ft. over spillway and murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastic baits. Crappie good with minnows and jigs below dam. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad below the dam. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 2.57 ft. below normal and rising slowly. Crappie poor. Walleye, white bass and striped bass hybrids fair to good. Blue catfish good to very good around the old fish-o-rama. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal with three floodgates open. Catfish fair on cut bait. Walleye fair on jigs behind the dam. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Foss: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water 55 and clear. Striped bass hybrids good with live bait along dam. Walleye fair near rocks. Crappie fair with minnows. Catfish good. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb : Elevation 2 1/2 ft. above normal and falling. Crappie slow on jigs and minnows. Striped bass hybrids and white bass slow. Catfish slow on cut bait. Saugeye slow. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County .

Lawtonka: Elevation above normal with one floodgate open. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at the dam. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Waurika: Elevation above normal, water 55 and murky. White bass and hybrid striped bass fair on pearl-colored jigs and live bait. Blue catfish fair on juglines and rod and reel with cut bait. Crappie fair in shallows around rock and structure. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County .

This program operates free from discrimination on the basis of political or religious opinion or affiliation, race, creed, color, gender, age, ancestry, marital status or disability. A person who feels he or she may have been discriminated against or would like further information should write: Director, Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, P.O. Box 53465 , Oklahoma City , OK 73152 , or Office of Equal Opportunity, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington , D.C. 20240 .

Huge striped bass hybrid takes lake record spot at Canton

Lifelong Oklahoma angler James Wesley Jones, Jr. of Canton said he loves fishing because it is a relaxing activity, but there was likely no relaxing going on April 19 when he landed a 23.2-lb. (23 lbs., 3 oz.) striped bass hybrid from Canton Lake. The huge fish qualifies as a lake record for Canton and falls only about an ounce shy of taking the state record spot as well, which is held by Paul Hollister and his 23-lb., 4 oz. fish caught April 1, 1997, from Altus-Lugert Lake .

Jones caught his fish in the evening using a 1-oz. rattletrap. Though the hybrid fell short of the state record, it reminds anglers that if they catch a potential state record fish, they should contact an employee of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation for procedures on certifying state records. Lake record fish are weighed on scales through lake record keepers registered with the Wildlife Department, but the weighing of state records must be done on certified scales with a witness from the Wildlife Department present.

Jones said the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s new Lake Record Fish Program does more than just recognize fish, but that it also encourages the sport of fishing. Before the program was in place, his near state record fish could have gone overlooked by anglers across the state, but the recognition his fish received through the Lake Record Fish Program reminds anglers of the potential that Oklahoma’s lakes hold for producing monster-sized fish.

“It gets people motivated to fish knowing that there are larger fish in the lake,” Jones said.

He said it is common in discussions among anglers to wonder about the sizes of the largest fish caught in lakes across the state.

“You don’t have to wonder anymore,” he said. “You can just go on and find out.”

Jones is referring to the Wildlife Department’s Web site, wildlifedepartment.com, which includes an easily-operated search feature that allows those interested to view a wealth of lake record fish information, ranging from the size of record fish caught to what kind of bait or rod and reel was used to catch them. And right now, lake records are being set and broken on a regular basis, which means the wealth of information on the Web site is updating and growing regularly as well.

Other recent lake records include a 4.8-lb. smallmouth bass caught by Derek Thurman of Collinsville . His fish went down as a record smallmouth for Skiatook Lake, but that record was broken just days later, on April 5, when angler Jim Horn of Cleveland landed a 6.6-lb. smallmouth bass from Skiatook using a bait casting rod and reel set up with a jig.

Lakes included in the program include Arbuckle, Broken Bow, Canton , Eufaula, Ft. Cobb , Grand, Kaw, Keystone, Sardis , Skiatook, Tenkiller, Texoma and Thunderbird.

Species eligible for spots in the lake records book include blue, channel and flathead catfish and largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass in addition to crappie, paddlefish, striped bass, striped bass hybrids, sunfish (combined) walleye/saugeye and white bass. Minimum weights are set for each species are detailed on the Wildlife Department’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com.

Anglers who catch a potential record from a participating lake should contact designated business locations around the lake that are enrolled as lake record keepers. A listing of official lake record keepers is available on wildlifedepartment.com.

Once it has been determined that an angler has landed a record fish, the media is notified and the public will be able to view information about the catch on the Wildlife Department’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com.

All past and current state record fish are registered in the Lake Record Fish Program as records for their respective lakes.

To see the complete database of all lake record fish caught, or to learn more about the Lake Record Fish program, log on to the Wildlife Department’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com.

LAKE RECORDS CAUGHT AND CERTIFIED MARCH 31 TO APRIL 24

Canton Lake

Striped Bass Hybrid

Weight: 23.2

Angler: James Wesley Jones, Jr.

Date: April 19

Bait: Hard baits/Plugs

Photo link: http://lake-record.ou.edu/fishsite/public/fishView.php?id=458

Grand Lake

Blue Catfish

Weight: 43 lbs.

Angler: Jerry Kropff

Date: April 3

Bait: Natural bait

Photo link: http://lake-record.ou.edu/fishsite/public/fishView.php?id=433

Grand Lake

Largemouth bass

Weight: 6.7 lbs.

Angler: Heath Konkler

Date: April 5

Bait: Hard baits/plugs

Photo link: http://lake-record.ou.edu/fishsite/public/fishView.php?id=437

Skiatook

Smallmouth bass

Weight: 6.6 lbs.

Angler: Jim Horn

Date: April 5

Bait: Jig

Photo link: http://lake-record.ou.edu/fishsite/public/fishView.php?id=456

Skiatook

Smallmouth bass

Weight: 4.8

Angler: Derek Thurman

Date: April 1

Bait: Hard baits/plugs

Photo link: http://lake-record.ou.edu/fishsite/public/fishView.php?id=449

Skiatook

Walleye/Saugeye

Weight: 8 lbs.

Angler: John Eller

Date: March 31

Bait: Soft plastic bait

Photo link: http://lake-record.ou.edu/fishsite/public/fishView.php?id=448

FISHING REPORT FOR APRIL 16, 2008

CENTRAL

Arcadia: Elevation 3 1/2 ft. above normal, water 56-59 and muddy. Largemouth bass good on black worms at 3 ft. in the morning around the north ramps and south banks. Channel catfish fair to good on plastic worms at 3-5 ft. in the morning around the south banks and in flooded timber on shad in the morning. All other fishing is fair. Report submitted by Linnie Mason, gate attendant.

NORTHEAST

Bell Cow: Elevation above normal and murky. Largemouth bass slow. Channel catfish fair on cut bait. Crappie slow. Report submitted by Gary Emmons, game warden stationed in Lincoln County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water 57 and muddy. Catfish fair on cut bait and worms. All other fishing has slowed due to heavy rains and fluctuating water levels. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Copan: Elevation 7 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie slow on minnow and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Blue catfish fair on cut shad. Channel catfish good in flooded areas on worms. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Eucha: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 54 and muddy. Prior to last week's heavy rains largemouth had been very active on spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Crappie have been slow on jigs and minnows. White bass action reported on upper end of lake. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 24 ft. above normal, water 58 and murky. White bass good up creek and in streams. Catfish good on worms, minnows and cut bait in running water. Boater are urged to use caution due to high water levels. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: Elevation 7 ft. above normal, water 51-58 and muddy. There is full generation and eight flood gates are open. The water is starting to fall this week. There are just a few ramps usable, and a lot of logs and debris on the lake. Bass are being caught on spinnerbaits and jigs. Crappie slow. Catfish fair in the rivers on shad. Paddlefish are being snagged in Riverview Park , Miami . There are more being caught from the Bee Creek to Twin Bridges. Trolling in boats is the method being used. Report submitted by Littlefield’s Sporting Goods & Greg Lambs Guide Service.

Grand: Elevation dropping, water 56-58 and muddy. Largemouth bass good on purple baits at 5-7 ft. in Honey Creek off points and at 7-10 ft. in Elk River off points. White bass slow. Channel and blue catfish good on worms, shad and blood baits in shallow water along shoreline. Blue and flathead catfish good on juglines and trotlines with goldfish and brooders at 20-40 ft. Crappie fair on minnows and dark colored jigs at 7-10 ft. Paddle fish slow. Report submitted by Sam Williams, Grand Lake Sports.

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits along shoreline and creek channels. Catfish good on stinkbaits and cut baits on bottom. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at fishing dock and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hulah: Elevation 14 ft. above normal and murky. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Blue catfish good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal and muddy. White bass excellent in the upper portions of Little Beaver using jigs, sassy shads and in-line spinners. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush and rocks, lake wide at 4-12 ft. Paddlefish snagging slow below Kaw Dam. Blue and channel catfish fair on juglines using shad and sunfish at 6-25 ft. in the Washunga, Bear, and Pioneer areas. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Oologah: Elevation 11 1/2 ft. above normal, water 50-60 and muddy. Blue and channel catfish fair on juglines baited with shad on flats in upper areas of the lake 10ft. Black bass fair on spinnerbaits and jigs around flooded vegetation. Crappie fair around standing timber on minnows and jigs at 10-15 ft. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 8 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits along windy points on the lower half of the lake. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair in open water. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-20 ft. around structure. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: White bass and hybrid striped bass good discharge channel on ghost minnows. Catfish fair on cut and live bait. Crappie slow. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Spavinaw: Elevation 1 ft. above normal level. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Webbers Falls: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits in creek channels and riprap. Catfish good on cut baits on bottom. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near bridges and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs in upper end of the lake. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs in upper end of the lake. White bass good on jigs in upper end of lake and river. Striped bass hybrid and channel catfish good on crawdad tails and night crawlers along north shore. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 58-61 and muddy up creeks, stained elsewhere. Crappie on brush piles, some have moved to the shallows. White bass chasing shad in back of coves. Bass fair on crankbaits, spinnerbaits and Texas rigged worms. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 58 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on minnows and flies. Channel catfish fair on liver and worms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Elevation 22 ft. above normal. Largemouth bass good on worms, plastics and crankbaits. Catfish good on juglines and trotlines baited with sunfish. Crappie being caught around structure. The only open boat ramp is south of Smithville at the narrows. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 8 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits flipping into flooded timber. White bass good on jigs below the dam. Blue catfish fair on shad in creek openings. Crappie fair on minnows or jigs in flooded timber. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation 15 ft. above normal. White bass fair to good in the upper feeder creeks. Crappie fair on minnows. Catfish and crappie good below the dam. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan Counties .

Konawa: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 73 and murky. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits along points and road beds at 8-10 ft. Channel catfish good on shad in the discharge canal at 15 ft. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

Lower Mountain Fork River: Trout slow to fair due to recent rain. Fishing should improve when the spillway gates are closed. Report submitted by Beavers Bend Fly Shop.

McGee Creek: Elevation 6 1/3 ft above normal, 58 degrees, and murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on soft plastic lures and crawfish colored crankbaits at 6-12 ft. along brush. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Elevation normal, water 53 and stained. Largemouth and smallmouth bass excellent on spinnerbaits and jerk baits. White bass fair around Martin's Landing on minnows and jigs and on crankbaits trolling. Channel catfish fair on stinkbait, worms and chicken liver. Crappie good on jigs and minnows shallow. Walleye good on jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation extremely high and murky. Bass good in submerged road beds on crankbaits. Crappie fair in flooded timber and great at the spillway on jigs. Catfish being caught on night crawlers around Turkey reek and in the upper river channel. Anglers should use caution. Lake is elevated at a near record and many structures could be hidden. Many boat ramps are closed also. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation above normal, water 61and murky. Largemouth bass fair at 2-5 ft. using plastic baits and spinnerbaits fishing the weed, rock and woody shorelines. Crappie good at 1-3 ft. using minnows and jigs fishing the spawning areas around the lake. White bass slow using jigs fishing downstream from Webbers Falls dam. Blue catfish good at 5-15 ft. using fresh cut shad and worms fishing the edge of the current on all the runoff water coming into the lake. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Elevation 5 ft. above normal and muddy. Bass fair on plastics around structure shallow at 2-3 ft. White bass fair in creek channels plastic bait and yellow and white grubs. Catfish excellent worms in flooded fields. Crappie fair on minnows around brush piles, tower and bridges. Walleye fair trolling islands. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation 4 1/2 ft. above normal, water 60 and rising. Water muddy North and clean South. Striped bass fair on live bait Platter Flats south. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits Platter Flats south. Channel and blue catfish fair on live bait and cut bait north end of lake. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs in Widow Moore Creek. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 27 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Water is 6 ft. over the spillway. Largemouth bass good on soft plastic baits. Crappie good with minnows and jigs below dam. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad below the dam. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 3 ft. below normal and rising. Crappie poor. Walleye fair. Striped bass hybrids fair to good. Blue catfish good to very good around the old fish-o-rama. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal with nine floodgates open. Catfish and walleye good behind the dam. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County

Foss: Elevation 1 ft. below normal and gates closed. Water temp in the 50's and clear. White bass good in the river on jigs. Striped bass hybrids good along dam with live bait. Walleye fair along dam. Catfish fair with dough bait. Crappie fair. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: Elevation 3 1/2 ft. above normal and water murky. Catfish slow on cut baits. Striped bass hybrids and white bass slow on sassy shad. Crappie slow on jigs and minnows. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County .

Lawtonka: Elevation above normal with two floodgates open. Catfish fair to good at Jackson Creek on cut bait. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Tom Steed: Elevation normal, water murky. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair on spinnerbaits off the old highway. Crappie slow on minnows at 12-15 ft. near the dam. Report submitted by Dave Smith, game warden stationed in Kiowa County .

Waurika: Elevation above normal, water 53 and muddy. The water is rising and the spillway is closed. White bass and hybrid striped bass good on pearl or white colored jigs around the dam. Blue catfish fair on rod and reel and juglines on cut bait. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County .

Wakita, Hawley, and Manchester FD was summons for mutual aide at 5 p.m. Tuesday evening April 15th to help Kansas firefighter fight a large grass fire located 4 miles north of Waldon in Harper County.

“It burned approximately 1000 acres. One fire fighter from Kansas was taken to the Hospital in Anthony for smoke inhalation, treated and released. According to Gary Lillie, spokesperson with the Hawley FD.

A second grass fire was reported also Tuesday evening, two and one half miles north of Jet. Jet, Nash, Nesctunga and Hawley FD sent units to help fight the second Blaze. No further information is available on the Jet fire.

A conversation about insurance reform and affordable healthcare in Oklahoma will continue with the approval of a patient's bill of rights amendment authored by State Senator Jim Wilson. The amendment, which will require insurance companies to pay for health care procedures deemed medically necessary by a physician was attached to HB 2531 and now moves to the House of Representatives for an up-or-down vote.

"The debate about healthcare just reached a new level today with the passage of this amendment," Wilson, (D-Tahlequah) said. "Oklahomans fundamentally understand that the current health care system is broken, leaving far too many Oklahomans without healthcare and imprisoned by the irresponsible and negligent decisions of insurance company executives trying to grow their bottom line on the backs of the sickest and most vulnerable among us. We've given those Oklahomans a voice today and we intend to keep this momentum alive."

Wilson explained while passage of the amendment today ensured an-up-or-down in the Republican controlled House of Representatives, it could be sent to a conference committee where he fears it could meet its ultimate death.

"Conference committee's are often times where good bills go to die, and if the past actions of the Republicans in regard to healthcare are any indication to the fate of this bill, it will likely be sent to a conference committee to die," Wilson said. "We want this conversation about fixing the broken insurance industry and giving Oklahomans better healthcare coverage to continue. So I want to personally ask the Republicans for once to put policy over politics, forget about their rich friends in the insurance industry who they seem to be protecting, and keep this momentum alive."

Members of the Medford Lions Club were honor guests of Medford Cub Scout Troop 345 and their families, Tuesday evening with a special cook-out in Medford Lions Park
Town of 7,000 Bands Together to Sue Company over Lead and Arsenic Contamination

Nix, Patterson & Roach LLP, a nationally recognized plaintiffs’ law firm, filed a major class action lawsuit yesterday in Kay County, Oklahoma, on behalf of roughly 7,000 residents of the town of Blackwell, Oklahoma. The lawsuit accuses defendants Phelps Dodge Corporation and its parent company, Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold, Inc., of failing to properly address lead, arsenic, and cadmium contamination in the Blackwell area.

This contamination is related to the operation of the Blackwell Zinc Smelter, which was located in Blackwell from 1916 until 1974 and was at one time the largest smelter of its type in the United States. According to recent tests, 76 percent of Blackwell homes contain lead dust above safety levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and 90 percent of Blackwell homes are contaminated with arsenic above EPA safety standards.

As owners of the company which operated the Blackwell Zinc Smelter, Freeport-McMoRan and Phelps Dodge are liable for contamination related to smelting activities. This lawsuit demands that the defendants comprehensively remediate all contaminated property and reimburse residents for damage to property values. The legal action also asks defendants to provide for a medical-monitoring program open to all Blackwell residents.

Lead, arsenic, and cadmium can cause a wide variety of health problems, including brain damage, neurological damage, learning disabilities, and cancer. Blood tests conducted by the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) show that 30 percent of Blackwell children have enough lead in their blood to cause brain damage.

In the early 1990s, the EPA deferred oversight of the Blackwell Zinc Smelter site to the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) rather than place it on the National Priorities List (NPL). Since that time, the DEQ has set minimum cleanup levels for the defendants that are insufficient to protect human health.

“The contamination of Blackwell represents a public health crisis,” said Nelson Roach, a partner with Nix, Patterson & Roach and an attorney representing the plaintiffs. “Past and current attempts to remediate this town haven’t cleaned up the problem—they’ve covered up the problem. The children of this community are going to continue to be at risk until these companies are forced to remove this contamination properly.”

Charges were filed and an arrest warrant issued on a Medford women in Grant county district court April 14.

Mindy Lynn Ferry, 19, was charged with one felony count of unauthorized use of a vehicle and one misdemeanor count of petit larceny.

According to court documents filed by under Sheriff Tim Wilkerson on March 30, a report was taken of a stolen car. The suspect in the report was listed as Mindy Ferry.

A 1997 Ford Thunderbird was entered into the National Crime information center computer as being stolen from 602 West Highway 11 in Medford, Oklahoma.

The owner of the Thunderbird, Syrena L Hicks, allegedly also had a bankcard missing from her billfold.

On March 31, the Wichita Kansas police department recovered the Thunderbird from 1924 South Broadway in Wichita Ks. No one was around the vehicle at the time of recovery.

Later that night Ferry was identified in the same area. The Wichita PD spoke with Ferry and according to the affidavit, admitted taking the vehicle without permission.

The Redbud OHCE group is helping the Medford and Pond Creek/Hunter 4-H Club by sponsoring the recycling project for them. You may deposit only Kan-Okla. old phone books in a deposit box at Karl’s Apple market or Medford Patriot Star in Medford. Buy Rite Food, First State Bank in Pond Creek. If this is not convenient, you may take the old phone books to the third floor of the courthouse.

With the purchase of a newer model street cleaner from the city of Blackwell. The city of Medford offered for sale on e-bay the city surplus cleaner. It went to the high bidder this week for $1,001.00.

A powerful storm system is beginning to exit the state. In the wake of yesterday's storms there will be strong winds across the state today with an isolated chance of showers and thunderstorms. Temperatures will be much cooler into the weekend with a chance of freezing temperatures across the northern half of the state Saturday morning.

Injuries and Fatalities

Injuries were reported in Muldrow following the storm that moved through the area Wednesday night.

A 62-year-old woman died when her vehicle hydroplaned on US-62 near Apache, according to the Oklahoma Highway Patrol (OHP). OHP also worked numerous traffic collisions, including an injury wreck on US-75 in Okmulgee County. Eastbound lanes of the Will Rogers Turnpike are closed at mile marker 260 due to an injury accident involving two semi tractor trailers. Troopers advise that roadways are flooded in some areas and slick in still more. They urge motorists to slow down and drive for the conditions.

Apply now for Wildlife Department’s Controlled Hunts

Hunters can now submit their applications for the “2008-09 Controlled Hunts” over the Internet by logging on to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com.

“Hunters do not want to miss out on this unique opportunity. From pronghorn hunts in the Panhandle to youth turkey hunts, there is something for everyone,” said Micah Holmes, information supervisor for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. “The online application process is fast, simple and safe.”

After an individual submits an online application, they receive a message immediately confirming that their application was accepted.

“Sportsmen get instant confirmation that their application was filed correctly,” Holmes said.

Applicants have until May 15 to apply online.

Administered by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, the Controlled Hunts Program offers a wide variety of highly desirable hunts through a random drawing. Some hunts are held to provide high-quality hunting experiences on high-profile areas where it is necessary to regulate hunting pressure. Others are held to achieve management goals for certain species, and others are held to provide hunting experiences in areas where access is otherwise limited.

All applicants, including lifetime license holders, must pay a $5 application fee to enter the Controlled Hunts drawings. The fee is paid only once per person per year regardless of the number of categories entered.

For complete application instructions, including tips on enhancing your chances of being selected, log on to http://www.wildlifedepartment.com/controlhunt.htm.

CENTRAL

Draper: Elevation normal, water clear. Crappie fair on minnows off fishing docks. Bass fair on tandem spinners in shallow areas near structure. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

Thunderbird: Elevation 1 ft. above normal and clear. Crappie good on minnows and jigs over structure at 6-8 ft. Largemouth bass good on tandem spinners and plastic worms in shallow areas of coves and near structure. White bass good in Little River on in-line spinners, jigs and sassy shad. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

Wes Watkins: Elevation 1-2 ft. below normal, water 43 and murky. Catfish fair to good on minnows, worms, fresh cut baits, chicken livers and cut baits in deeper waters along main channel and down by dam area. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits in shallow waters. Report submitted by M.M. Fowler, St. Gregory’s.

NORTHEAST

Carl Blackwell: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 56 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on jigs. Hybrid striped bass fair trolling with crankbaits. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 9-10 ft. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Copan: Elevation 2 ft. above normal. Crappie good on minnow and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Blue catfish fair on cut shad. Early reports of white bass being caught on jigs. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Eucha: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal and rising, water 58 and dingy. Largemouth bass action has been excellent in shallow water using spinner baits. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish fair on juglines using cut shad. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 9 ft. above normal, water 55 and murky. White bass good in creeks. Catfish good on worms on the mud flats and rocky points. Paddlefish snagging good above Spring Creek to the low water. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 51-58 and murky above Horse Creek and stained from Horse Creek to the dam. Bass good on spinnerbaits, topwater lures and jigs. Crappie slow. Catfish fair in the rivers on shad. White bass are biting well in both rivers. Paddlefish snagging fair in Riverview Park in Miami . There are more being caught from Bee Creek to Twin Bridges. Trolling in boats is the method being used. Report submitted by Littlefield’s Sporting Goods & Greg Lambs Guide Service.

Greenleaf: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits along shoreline and creek channels. Catfish good on cut baits and stinkbaits on bottom. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at fishing dock and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hulah: Elevation 3 1/2 ft. above normal. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near submerged structure at 10-15 ft. Blue catfish good on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water 57 and murky. Blue and channel catfish good in Coon and Bear Creek flats, on juglines with shad and green sunfish. Crappie fair in Beaver and Otter creeks on jigs and minnows at 4-12 ft. White bass fair to good on sassy shad, roadrunners, and in-line spinnerbaits in Little Beaver Creek, with mostly small males being taken at this time. Largemouth bass fair on jerk baits and 3/8 oz. chartreuse and black spinners in Little Beaver and rocky lake coves. Paddlefish snagging fair below the 1,000 ft. mark of Kaw Dam when generation occurs. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Oologah: Elevation 6 ft. above normal and dropping, water 50-60 and muddy. White bass fair on jigs in Big Creek area and the Verdigris River above the lake. Blue catfish fair on shad on juglines in upper areas of the lake at 6-12 ft. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Skiatook: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits along windy points on the lower half of the lake. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair in open water. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-20 ft. around structure. All other fishing slow. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: White bass and hybrid striped bass good on ghost minnows and rattletraps. Crappie fair off Hwy. 15 on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Spavinaw: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal and rising, water 59 and murky. Largemouth bass have been active on spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish fair on juglines using cut shad. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Tenkiller: Elevation 9 ft. above normal, water 57-58 and murky. White bass fair on spoons and spinners in the creeks. Report by Monte Brooks Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits along riprap, creek channels and brush structure. Catfish good on stinkbaits and cut baits on bottom at mud flats. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at bridges and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Hybrid striped bass, channel catfish and walleye good along north shore on crawdad tails and night crawlers. Walleye good along dam on jigs and crankbaits in the evening. White bass good along dam and upper end of lake. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

Ft. Supply: Elevation slightly above normal, water clear. White bass good along the dam and below the dam. Crappie good on minnows along the jetties and at the gate tower. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water 59-61 and stained to muddy. Crappie good on docks and brush piles. White bass being caught up creeks and in back of coves. Bass fair using jigs, crankbaits and Carolina rigged lizards. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 62 and clear. Bass fair on minnows and flies. Catfish fair on liver and worms. Trout slow to fair on power bait, super dupers, roostertails and mealworms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Hugo: Elevation 10 ft. above normal, water 52. White bass fair in upper creek channels. Blue catfish and crappie good below the dam. Crappie good on minnows around brush. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan Counties .

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 72 and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic worms along pints and in weed beds at 5-8 ft. White bass good on minnows and jigs in the discharge canal at 15 ft. Channel catfish good on shad in the discharge canal at 15 ft. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

McGee Creek: Elevation 6 ft. above normal, water 55 and murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on soft plastic lures at 6-14 ft. and fair on deep shad-colored crankbaits along rocky points. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Elevation normal, water 53 and clear. Largemouth bass and smallmouth bass good on spinnerbaits, crankbaits and plastic jerk baits. White bass good on minnows and jigs, Channel catfish slow. Crappie good on minnows and jigs, Walleye good on minnows and jigs early in the morning and evening. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation extremely high and murky. Bass good in submerged road beds on crankbaits. Crappie fair in flooded timber. Catfish being caught on night crawlers around turkey creek. Contact the US Army Corps of Engineers, Pine Creek Office at (580) 933-4239 for info on ramp closures. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water 58 and murky. Largemouth bass fair using spinnerbaits and plastic baits fishing the weed, rock and woody shoreline cover. Crappie good at 6-8 ft. using minnows fishing in the deeper water off the spawning beds. White bass good using shad imitation lures fishing up the major creeks. Blue catfish good at 5-15 ft. using fresh cut bait fishing the windy shorelines around the lake. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Elevation 3-4 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on plastics around submerged brush. White bass fair in creek channels and deep holes on grubs. Blue catfish good in flooded fields on worms and on juglines and trotlines baited with cut bait. Crappie being caught around brush, tower and bridge on minnows. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water 56 and murky north and clear south. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair to good on spinnerbaits at south end of lake. Striped and white bass fair to good on live bait, slabs and sassy shad-from Platter Flats south. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on minnows and cut baits from Platter Flats north to the Washita River . Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs at Widow Moore, Kansas and upper Rock creeks. All other fishing is slow. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 27 ft. above normal. Going over the spillway and murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastic baits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs below dam. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad below the dam. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal with one floodgate open. Walleye and saugeye fair behind dam on figs and grubs. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County

Foss: Elevation 14 in. below normal, water 50s and clear. Fishing should improve since gates have been closed. Sand Bass good in the river. Hybrid striped bass fair on live bait near the dam. Walleye fair on live bait along dam. Crappie good around fish house. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Tom Steed: Elevation above normal, water murky. White bass and saugeye fair on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Tom Steed, game warden stationed in Kiowa County .

The Oklahoma Highway patrol has closed US177 approx 2 1/2 miles north of US64 in Noble County near the Black Bear

Creek is under water, unknown depth.

The Grant County Conservation Fair Baking Contest was held recently at the Medford Civic Center. Prizes for the bread contest are furnished by Farmers Grain Company, Pond Creek.

Adult Division: Whole Wheat Bread: 1st Kristy Williams 2nd Beth Peters 3rd Mildred Mitchell 4th Evelyn Truhlar 5th Wanda Bollman 6th Effie Misak. White Bread: 1st Wanda Bollman 2nd Effie Misak 3rd Evelyn Truhlar 4th Mildred Mitchell 5th Shirlene McKee 6th Kristy Williams. White Dinner Rolls: 1st Evelyn Truhlar 2nd Mildred Mitchell 3rd Wanda Bollman 4th Effie Misak. Whole Wheat Dinner Rolls: 1st Evelyn Truhlar 2nd Mildred Mitchell 3rd Wanda Bollman 4th Effie Misak. Fancy Bread: 1st Wanda Bollman 2nd Effie Misak 3rd Evelyn Truhlar 4th Lisa Reimer. Variety Bread: 1st Wanda Bollman 2nd Evelyn Truhlar 3rd Effie Misak 4th Lisa Reimer. Senior Division (ages 14-18) White Bread 1st Abbey Kilian. Quick Bread: 1st Kaley Jantzen 2nd Abbey Kilian 3rd Caleb Watts 4th Sarah Zeman 5th Daniel Watts. Participation: Isaac Watts. Fancy Bread: 1st Katy Jantzen 2nd Abbey Kilian. Intermediate Division (ages 10 – 13) Whole Wheat Bread: 1st Cody Williams White Bread: 1st KaLanne McKee 2nd Cody Williams. Quick Bread: 1st Cody Williams 2nd Jeremiah Watts 3rd KaLanne McKee 4th Katherine Muegge. Muffins: 1st Rachel Watts 2nd Bria Taylor 3rd Cody Williams 4th Meagan Sanders. Junior Division (preschool – age 9) Participation: Muffins: Sierra Williams, Joe Jantzen, Cheyenne Williams, JinYu Burnham, Benjamin Watts. Drop Cookies: Samuel Watts, Joe Jantzen, Harrison Muegge.

HOME & COMMUNITY EDUCATION CHERRY PIE CONTEST RESULTS

The Grant County Oklahoma Home and Community Education (OHCE) held their annual Cherry Pie Baking Contest in conjunction with the recent Conservation Fair. The pies were judged in the afternoon and were auctioned to the highest bidder. The proceeds from the auction will be used for OHCE community service and educational projects throughout the year.

Results of the contest are as follows: 1st – Wanda Bollman Goodwill, purchased by Grant County Bank; 2nd Donna Jean Tebow, Willing Workers, purchased by State Exchange Bank, Lamont; 3rd – Effie Misak, Redbud, purchased by Bank 7, Medford; 4th – Cheryl Watts, Willing Workers, purchased by State Exchange Bank, Lamont; 5th –Linda Wade, Goodwill, purchased by First State Bank, Pond Creek; 6th – Evelyn Truhlar, Redbud, purchased by Grant County Farm Bureau; Dorothy Rapp, Goodwill, purchased by Farm Credit of Enid; Wilma Hajek, Redbud, Alice Heusel, Willing Workers, purchased by State Exchange Bank, Lamont.

Grant County OHCE would like to express their appreciation to all the individuals and organizations purchasing pies, to the Grant County Conservation District for sponsoring the contest and to the Grant County Bank for sponsoring the ribbons & premiums.

Entry Deadline Soon for Grant County 4-H Fashion Revue & Impressive Dress

Grant County 4-H Fashion Revue & Impressive Dress Contest will be held Monday, April 14, 2007 at 7:00pm at the Wakita Bi-Centennial Building, 200 South Spruce Street. There is still time for 4-H’ers to enter before the Monday April 7 deadline.

The public is invited to come to the contest and fashion show to see the result of Grant County 4-Her’s project work.

For the fashion revue contest, the 4-H member must construct his or her garments. Garments for Impressive Dress may be purchased or constructed by the 4-H’er.

The evening will include several fun events that community members may wish to participate in or watch. Entry forms and narrations for all events must be received in the extension office by April 7.

Class descriptions and entry forms for the 4-H contests and fun events are available from the Grant County OSU Cooperative Extension Office, 112 E. Guthrie Room 301 Courthouse Medford, Oklahoma, 580-395-2134 or on the Grant County Extension website at http://oces.okstate.edu/grant

4-H’ers must deliver Fashion Revue garments, entry forms & narration to the extension office 112 E. Guthrie Room 301 Courthouse Medford, Oklahoma by April 7, 2008 for flat judging. Deliver entry forms & narration for Impressive Dress to the extension office by April 7 also. After flat judging the Fashion Revue garments will be available for pickup at the extension office on Monday April 11.

Optional modeling practice and tips for participants will be held before the contest at 6:30pm at the Wakita Bi-Centennial Building. For more information contact Robyn Rapp, Extension Educator at 580-395-2134 or robyn.rapp@okstate.edu.

Oklahoma’s price gouging statute prohibits an increase of more than 10 percent in the price of most goods and services when a state of emergency has been declared.

“No person for the duration of a declaration of emergency by the Governor of this state or by the President of the United States and for thirty (30) days thereafter shall sell, rent, or lease, or offer to sell, rent, or lease, for delivery in the emergency area, any goods, services, dwelling units, or storage space in the emergency area at a rate or price which is more than ten percent (10%) above the rate or price charged by the person for the same or similar goods, services, dwelling units, or storage spaces immediately prior to the declaration of emergency unless the increase in the rate or price is attributable only to factors unrelated to the emergency and does not include any increase in profit to the seller or owner,” the statute says.

March 2008, Cindy Bobbit, - "Success or failure?"

It has been 13 months since the February 2007 Presidential disaster ice storm was declared and eight months since the last Presidential disaster flood of 2007 was declared for Grant County. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) wants all permanent disaster repairs made within 12 months from the date of declaration. This has been a very difficult task due to several facts.

First a “kick off” meeting must be scheduled with FEMA, as well as the Oklahoma Emergency Management Agency (OEMA), some time after each and every declaration is made. Paperwork is then completed to determine each county’s eligibility. Once a determination is made and if a county qualifies, a FEMA project specialist and an OEMA project officer are assigned. The larger, harder hit counties generally receive priority, but assistance is also given on a first-come, first-served basis. Once the project specialist and project officer arrive at the county, all damaged sites must be viewed, measured and assessed. A report is then written for approved sites. For each site, the paperwork includes an estimated and itemized log of all equipment (trucks, trailers, pickups, packers, graders, backhoes, trackhoes, etc.), all product (culverts, steel, rip rap, fill dirt, shale, rock, etc.) and manpower (non-paid regular hours or paid overtime hours). The county commissioner, the FEMA project specialist and OEMA Project officer approve this paperwork, and it then sent to FEMA program assistance coordinator for additional approval. Generally, funds for smaller projects (less than $50,000) distributed as soon as the paperwork is approved. All large projects must be 100 percent completed and 100 percent approved before receiving any funds.

For Grant County, this first part took months and months to complete. District 2 has received FEMA funds (75 percent) for all its small projects (as originally filed) and is waiting on the OEMA (12.5 percent) funds. The County provides the other 12.5 percent of costs. If small projects exceed the estimated costs, documents must be submitted with final prices reflected. These “over cost” claims may or may not receive approval and funding. District 2 has submitted “over cost” claims, and the County is yet to receive reimbursement.

The second obstacle to disaster repair is the excess rainfall that began in March 2007 and continued through October 2007, which hindered the completion of many projects. In December the rain, snow, and/or ice began, and today, Grant County continues to be in a “wet cycle.”

The third and largest obstacle to disaster repair is that Grant County District 2 has 682 road miles, and not all of these roads were eligible for FEMA funds. However, all 682 miles needed and continue to need repairs and attention.

Repair of six of the 17 miles of road that received ice damage has been completed. Unfortunately, the other 11 miles have not been completed; therefore, District 2 applied for a 6-month extension to complete these repairs. What remains to be finished includes adding rock to five miles on the Jefferson road, two miles on the Renfrow road, and four miles on the ARM road. No monies have been received for any of these projects because these 17 miles were written up as one large project, which is estimated to cost $88,000.

Possibly the most challenging aspect of large FEMA projects is that the county must front 100 percent of the cost with FEMA and OEMA reimbursing the county at 75 percent and 12.5 percent after the work has been done. This is very difficult on such limited funds.

One reason that the 11 miles are not finished is that District 2 chose to work these rock roads in between building roads and hauling shale in the Renfrow area as well as laying shale and rock on other roads in poor condition. You have to give and take to TRY to make as many improvements as possible. I know I have failed in making everyone happy but I have been fair to everyone involved.

Another large project that District 2 is currently working on is the repair of the State Line Bridge over the Chikaskia River. The repairs to the bridge have been engineered, bids were released and a bid was accepted. The bid was awarded to Graham Excavating and Construction out of Stillwater, Okla. Their work is to be completed on or before May 1, 2008. Additionally, District 2 applied for an Emergency Watershed Project (EWP) grant to rep rap both the east and west banks and on both north and south sides. More information will be available about this project later.

When determining the success or failure of a project, I think Winston Churchill said it best: “Success is the ability to go from failure to failure without losing your enthusiasm.”

I am very enthusiastic about Grant County and the improvements that have been and continue to be made. No – they are not as fast as I would like or as fast as you desire, but District 2 employees give 200 percent effort every day for you. District 2 employees include Bryan Brown, Robert Moss, Jon Trenary, Rich Donaldson, Bob Werneke, Steve Wilson, Tom Phillips, Richard Metcalf, Jeremy Bellin, Ronnie Cambron, Gene Clayton, Bruce Shook, Joey Hayes, Jimmie Loveall, Greg Doty and David Cink.

As always, for more information check out our website at www.grantdistrict2.com. Questions and comments may be made by calling me at the office at 580-395-2859 or by e-mail at gtcommd2@wiredok.com.

A two-vehicle accident occurred on US 81 at the Grant and Garfield county line Sunday evening March 23, when according to a report from OHP Trooper Cole Patterson, a 2004 Chevy pickup was northbound driven by Todd Sellers, Kremlin, had slowed to make a left hand turn.

An 84 Chevy Impala driven by Patricia Hayes, Pond Creek, attempted to pass. The two vehicles collided at the intersection.

Hayes was issued a citation for left of center with in 100 feet of an intersection.

Both drivers were transported to an Enid hospital by Pond Creek fire/EMS, treated and released.

A fatality accident occurred on Easter Sunday March 23 at 7:05 p.m. one mile north of Medford on US 81.

According to a report received from Oklahoma Highway patrol, a 2004 PT Cruiser driven by Nolan W. Mercer, 67, Caldwell Kansas was transported to Blackwell Hospital by the Medford EMS services and was dead on Arrival with head and trunk injuries.

The report stated that the vehicle Mercer was driving on US 81 failed to negotiate a curve and ran off the east side of the road, hit a concrete culvert and then rolled 2 and ½ times coming to rest upside down on its top.

The cause of the accident as listed in the report was alcohol related and unsafe speed on curve.

Seat belts were not in use by the driver.

The accident was investigated by troopers Jeff Jech, Cole Patterson, John Marion and Linda Hartley. Assisting was the Grant County Sheriff;s department, Medford PD and Medford Fire and EMS services.

A family pet a white Poodle also parished in the accident

Mercer was also in another serious accident March 13, on the Jefferson Blacktop. He was a passenger with Linda Wittum when the pickup she was driving rolled. Wittum remains in ICU in St. marys Hospital in Enid.

Frankie Robbins, Medford, is pictured registering at the Medford Civic Center, to give blood during the recent blood drive. 50 pints of blood was received, which according to officials was a great turnout considering the flu and cold season.
Love Bears and Huggies will soon be on there way to Grant county service men and women serving overseas. OHCE Redbud and Grant county 4-H Members met recently at the Medford Christian church to make and package the care gifts.

A large group of representivies from 12 different Grant county entities and county officers met Thursday evening at the Medford services building to discuss and ask question concerning the 1.1 million dollars Grant County received in sales tax revenue in what once alleged sale of Western Gas Resources to Altas and now claims was an exchange of stocks and not subject to sales tax.

During the meeting, Grant County Treasurer Penny Dowel told the group, That just before the meeting she had receive a telephone call from Trey Caovich, controller from Atlas, expressing his concern about the return of the money being asked by OTC from Grant county, stating that he would like to meet with Grant county commissioners to see if Altas could help, possibility.

During the commissioners regular meeting, Monday morning Grant county ADA Steven Young told the commissioners he felt the meeting went well Thursday evening and that each entities would come up with their own pay back plan and turn those figures into Treasurer Dowel. That he (Young) should have those figures for the commissioners to review by next Mondays meeting.

Steven Young ADA for Grant County is pictured Thursday evening answering questions concerning the 1.1 Million dollars being asked by OTC to be returned

FISHING REPORT FOR MARCH 19, 2008

NORTHEAST

Birch: Elevation normal, water in the lower 40's and clear. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 15-30 ft. around brush piles. Blue catfish good on cut shad at 10-15 ft. near creek channels. Striped bass hybrids and white bass fair on jigs and spinners up the creeks. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Carl Blackwell: Elevation normal, water 51 and murky. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish fair on cut bait. Report submitted by Jon Cunningham, game warden stationed in Payne County .

Copan: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. above normal. Crappie slow on minnow and jigs near submerged structure. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. above normal, water 43 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on salt craws and jigs around rocky points and deep structure. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 15-20 ft. around docks. Paddlefish snagging fair around rocky points. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Grand: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 46-57 and dirty above Sailboat Bridge and from Sailboat Bridge to Horse Creek and stained from Horse Creek to the dam. Bass being caught on jigs, spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Crappie slow with a few being caught on darker colors, Grandpa's gigs in the browns, blacks, or grays at 10-25 ft. Catfish being caught drifting and on jugs with shad at 15-20 ft. in mid-lake. White bass in the upper end of the Neosho River and in Spring River . Paddlefish being snagged trolling in boats at Riverview Park in Miami ; there are more being caught from the mouth of Elk River up to Osage hollow. Report submitted by Littlefield’s Sporting Goods & Greg Lamb’s Guide Service.

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits along creek channels and shoreline. Catfish good on stinkbaits and cut baits on bottom. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 8-12 ft. around brush structure and fishing dock. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Hulah: Elevation normal. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs near submerged structure. Blue Catfish fair on cut shad. Report submitted by Joe Alexander, game warden stationed in Washington County .

Kaw: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 47 and murky. Blue catfish excellent on the trotlines and juglines on the flats in the Coon Creek and Washunga Bay areas using cut shad at 6-18 ft. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs off of the Washunga bay riprap, Pioneer, and Osage cove areas at 6-15 ft. White bass fair in the upper Arkansas and Little Beaver areas on sassy shads and in line spinners. Paddlefish snagging fair to good for smaller males below the 1,000 ft. mark of Kaw dam on both sides of the river. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Keystone: Elevation 3 3/4 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass good on jigs, chunk baits and spinnerbaits at 4-8 ft. in creeks and rocky points along clay banks. Smallmouth bass fair on crankbaits, jigs and chunk baits at 6-10 ft. around secondary points in deep coves. Spotted bass fair on spinnerbaits and small jigs at 4-8 ft. in small coves off main lake. White bass fair on small jigs and minnows at 4-8 ft. in creeks. Striped bass good on buck tails and sassy shad at 3-6 ft. below dam. Channel catfish good on worms at 5-10 ft. in creeks. Blue catfish fair on shad at 10-20 ft. midway back in coves. Flathead catfish slow on goldfish and shad at 10-20 ft. around rocky bluffs. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 4-20 ft. in creeks and deeper around docks and main lake. Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Oologah: Elevation 1 ft above normal, water upper 40's to low 50's and murky. White bass good on jigs in the Verdigris River and Big Creek above the main lake. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs in creeks around the lake at 4-8 ft. Blue catfish fair on shad off flats on the upper end of the lake at 10-15 ft. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Pawhuska Lake: Elevation normal, water in the upper 40's and clear. Trout excellent on power bait and fair trolling super dupers at 10-20 ft. Spotted bass fair on crappie jigs and spinnerbaits at 10-15 ft. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Osage County.

Skiatook: Elevation 6 ft. above normal, water clear. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs along creek channels in standing timber. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits. White bass good. Hybrid striped bass good in the discharge channel on sassy shad and rattletraps in the evening. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs in deep water over brush piles. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Tenkiller: Elevation 5 ft. above normal and falling, water murky mid-lake to clear at both ends of the lake. Largemouth bass slow on bass jigs with some action in coves. Crappie slow with on 1/16 oz. jigs some action at 30 ft. around brush. White bass starting to hit in the upper end trolling. Report submitted by Monte Brooks, Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits along riprap and creek channels. Catfish good on cut baits and stinkbaits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at bridges and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County

NORTHWEST

Ft. Supply: Elevation above normal, water clear. White bass good on jigs and spinnerbaits along the dam. Crappie good on jigs at the gate tower and at the jetties. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. above normal, water 49 and stained. White bass excellent up creeks in shallow water using rattletraps and grubs. Crappie fair off docks and brush piles using jigs. Bass fair using crankbaits, jigs and Carolina-rigged lizards. Report submitted by Jack Melton

Blue River: Elevation slightly above normal and rising, water 59 and murky to muddy. Largemouth bass slow on minnows and flies. Channel catfish fair on liver and worms. Trout fair on power bait, super dupers, rooster tails and mealworms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Elevation rising, water 49 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on spoons and deep running crankbaits around islands and off points. Catfish good on juglines and trotlines baited with cut bait. Crappie fair on minnows or jigs around structure in the upper end of the lake. Walleye good in the upper end of the lake staging at 40-45 ft. on deep running crankbaits. White bass have started running in the upper end of the Mountain Fork on white and yellow rooster tails. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal and clear. Largemouth bass fair on jerk baits and plastic baits at 3-6 ft. around rocky areas. Blue catfish fair on shad deep in creek channels at 10-20 ft. Crappie fair on minnows around the I-40 riprap and boat docks at 6-15 ft. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation normal, water 49. White bass good on jigs and trolling crankbaits. Channel catfish fair. Crappie good on minnows at 10-15 ft. All fishing good below the dam. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 55 and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic worms in weed beds at 4-8 ft. White bass and hybrid striped bass good on shad and minnows at 15 ft. in the discharge channel. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

Lower Mountain Fork River: Trout success has been reduced due to recent rains. The river is running high and very muddy. Once the rain subsides, the river system clears pretty quickly and will return to good fishing in a couple of days. So the fishing should be back to normal by the weekend, assuming the rain subsides soon. Report submitted by Beavers Bend Fly Shop.

McGee Creek: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water 49 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastic lures and jig and pig at 10-20 ft. and fair on deep running crank baits along rocky points. Crappie fair on minnows at 12-18 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Murray: Water 49 and clear. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair on crankbaits and jigs on soft plastics. White bass being caught on minnows, jigs and crankbaits. Crappie are being caught at 3-10 ft. on jigs and minnows around the dam. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County .

Pine Creek: Elevation above normal, water murky. Bass are good on soft plastics. Crappie good on minnows around submerged tops and timber. Catfish fair on chicken liver and night crawlers. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation normal, water 55 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and plastic baits at 5-6 ft. fishing the weed, rock and woody banks. Crappie fair on minnows at 10 ft. drift fishing in the old creek channels. White bass good using shad imitation lures fishing up in the major creeks, fish have started moving up the creeks. Blue catfish fair at 3-6 ft. using fresh cut bait fishing the windy shorelines that contain some cover. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good to excellent on plastics, spinnerbaits and plugs along riprap, in coves and off points. White bass excellent on grubs and sassy shad in creek channels. Blue and flathead catfish fair on jugs and trotlines baited with live shad or cut bait. Walleye fair on grubs in creek channels and around riprap. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water 49 and clear. Striped bass fair to good on live bait and sassy shad near the islands at 15-20 ft. Largemouth and smallmouth bass fair on slow moving bait at 15-20 ft. around riprap. Channel and blue catfish fair to good on live bait and cut shad at 10-15 ft. in the upper Red River . Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs at 10-15 ft. deep around brush and fish attractors. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 15 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass good on soft plastic baits. Crappie very good with minnows and jigs below dam. Channel and blue catfish very good on cut shad below the dam. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 4 ft. below normal and rising. Crappie poor. Walleye's fair on those too small to keep; poor on "keepers", White bass fair. Trout fishing has slowed to fair in the river. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal with 1 floodgate open. Walleye and saugeye fair to good behind the dam on jigs and spinners. Crappie good at Ralph's Resort on jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County

Foss: Elevation 1/2 ft. above normal, water 50 and clear. Crappie and catfish fair. Walleye and striped bass hybrids slow. Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb: Elevation 3/4 ft. above normal. Crappie slow around marina and boat slips. Saugeye slow along east end of dam. Catfish slow on cut baits. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County .

Lawtonka: Elevation normal and clear. Crappie fair off the dam in deep water. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Waurika: Elevation normal, water 46 and murky. Blue catfish being on shad and punch bait. Crappie being caught on jigs and minnows in the marina and Wichita Ridge. White bass are being caught off points and along dam. Report submitted by Phillip Cottrill, game warden stationed in Jefferson County .

Free newsletter subscription available

The Grant County Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Office offers a free educational newsletter each month to area residents. To subscribe contact the office at 112 E. Guthrie Room 301 Courthouse Medford, Oklahoma 73759-1246, email beth.m.peters@okstate.edu or phone 580-395-2134. The newsletter may also be viewed on our new website http://oces.okstate.edu/grant.

If you are already a subscriber and your mailing address or email address has changed, please contact the extension office to update your contact information.

Editors of the newsletter are Scott Price, Grant County Extension Educator, Ag/4-H Youth Development and C.E.D. and Robyn Rapp, Grant County Extension Educator Family & Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development. They draw on their own expertise in many different program areas as well as publish sound information from research based sources.

The Grant County Agricultural Newsletter concentrates on crop, livestock, ag business, garden, and landscape information. Family and Consumer Sciences Newsline contains articles related to family life, parenting, financial management, health, environment, along with event information for the Oklahoma Home and Community Education (OHCE) groups. Grant County 4-H Clover Connection is full of 4-H project information, skill and character building articles, county, district and state 4-H event information, and announcements about fun educational activities available to all area young people.

1 pound Hot Sausage

1 pound Regular

Sausage

1/2 Green Bell Pepper, and 1/2 onion

chopped (can use

more or less)

2 pound bag frozen

Hash Browns, thawed

Seasoned Salt and

Pepper to taste

2 cups Cheddar and

Jack Cheese mix

12 Eggs

1/2 cup Milk, may add a

bit more if needed....

Tabasco to taste

Brown sausages,onoin and bell pepper. Set aside.

Grease a 12 x 15 x 2-inch baking dish and layer the following:

Evenly spread the meat mixture over the bottom on prepared dish; followed by the hash-browns that have been sprinkled with seasoned salt and pepper. Now if you want to wait until the morning to bake, cover and refrigerate....when ready to bake, remove from fridge and set on counter for about 30 minutes to remove the chill and prepare the remaining ingredients.

In a large bowl, whisk eggs with milk and Tabasco — a few extra splashes of milk if needed.

Evenly sprinkle cheese over potatoes.

Pour egg mixture over layers and bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes to 1 hour.

West Cherokee was closed to traffic when a old water line under the street developed a leak.

“The water main is on the north side of the street and was put in long before Joe Reed’s drive,” said Dennis Britain, water supervisor. “A service line was connected to the main and ran across the street to provide water the house on the south side of Cherokee.

Years later, the Reed drive was built over that service tap. A leak developed in the old line somewhere under the street. An effort to avoid destroying the street and a private drive, the city cut a hole on both sides of Cherokee and pushed a long rod under the street, Then we pulled a new section of pipe back under the street and by doing this we bypassed the leak.” stated Brittain.

The Medford public school system recently

participated in Oklahoma

Farm Bureau’s DUI Prevention

Program, due to the support of

Grant County’s FBW Committee

And Board of Directors.

Medford High schools students spent Tuesday afternoon March 11, learning about the damaging

Affects of drinking and Driving.

OFB Safety Specialist David Turner gave

A presentation on the statistics

Associated with underage

Drinking, followed by sobriety

Tests conducted by Grant County

Sheriff’s deputy , Jeremy Brittain Roger Christman, Medford police chief

and Oklahoma Highway Patrol trooper Marion

Students were then challenged

to maneuver through

A course in go-carts wearing

Intoxication simulation goggles.

Picture

Medford school principle Jay Edelen is pictured trying his driving skills wearing the intoxication simulation goggles Tuesday afternoon during the OFB DUI prevention program. Marcie Lusk, OFB agent, is instructing Mr. Edelen.

A Medford woman, Linda Sue Wittum, 37, was admitted to St. Mary Hospital in Enid early Thursday morning March 13, and listed in critical condition from head, trunk and internal injuries after being involved in a one vehicle accident on the Jefferson Blacktop one and six tenths of a mile east of Red Hill Road.

According to the Oklahoma Highway patrol report, the 2008 Nissan Titian pickup Wittum was driving was eastbound ran off the south side of the roadway into the ditch and over corrected going back across the blacktop into the north ditch and began to roll. Rolling approximately three times coming to rest on its wheels in a field. According to the

Report, seat belts were in use, and no one was pinned or ejected in the accident.

A passenger, Nolan W. Mercer, 67, Caldwell Kansas, was transported to Bass Baptist hospital in Enid and admitted in serious condition, with head, trunk, internal and arm injuries.

The cause of the accident as list on the report, was alcohol related. The accident is under investigation, according to the report.

Assisting with the accident were troopers Marion and Jech, Grant County Sheriff’s department, deputy Jeremy Brittain, Pond Creek Fire/Rescue, Medford ambulance services and the Medford PD, Roger Christman.

The public is invited to hear Marcy John, extension educator from Alfalfa County speak about salads that can serve as a complete meal Thursday March 20 at 10:00 am. The educational lesson will be held at the Grant County OSU Cooperative Extension Office Grant County OSU Cooperative Extension Office at 112 E. Guthrie Room 301 Courthouse Medford, Oklahoma. For more information or to request copies of the printed handout contact Robyn Rapp, extension educator at 580-395-2134 or robyn.rapp@okstate.edu.
News 9 was in town today to do a story on the County-wide emergency services tax. We finally had a chance to give our side of the story. It will air tonight at 6:00.
Posted this 7th day of March, 2008, at 1:35 p.m. at the main office entrance, cafeteria doors, and workroom in the Medford School Building and the school website.

Posted by Gloria Gonzales. Deputy Clerk

(NOTE: The Medford Board of Education may discus, vote to approve, vote to disapprove, vote to table or decide not to vote on any item on this agenda.

Call to order and recording of members present and absent to establish a quorum.

Teacher’s report

Principal’s report

Superintendent’s report

Consent Agenda - (All of the following items, which concern reports and items of a routine nature normally approved at a board meeting, will be approved by one board vote, unless any board member desires to have a separate vote on any or all of these items. The consent agenda consists of the discussion, consideration, and approval of the following items):

Approve with corrections minutes of February 11, 2008 regular meeting.

Approval of monthly financial reports ending March 7, 2008.

i. Treasurer’s cash balance report

ii. Encumbrance and warrant registers in the general, and building funds.

iii. School activity fund monthly summary

iv. Transfer of funds within the Activity Account:

1. $150.35 from All Sports to FFA

Discussion, motion and vote to approve or not to approve Summer Drivers Education Program, tuition fees and instructor(s).

Board to consider and take action on a resolution determining the maturities of, and setting a date, time and place for the sale of the $590,000 General Obligation Building Bonds of the School District voted and approved on the 4th day of March, 2008.

Discussion, motion and vote to enter into Executive Session to discuss the following items:

· Evaluation and employment of certified staff as listed on Exhibit A. 25 O.S. §307 (B)(1).

Vote to convene or not to convene into executive session.

Vote to acknowledge the board has returned to open session without any action being taken in executive session.

Reading of executive session minutes compliance statement.

Motion, consideration and vote to renew or table the renewal of the following individuals for 2008-2009:

Brenda Almond, Julie Angle, Lori Bowman, Bridget Cink, John Cope, Becky Cope, Ross Doane, Christy Edelen, Ryan Ellis, Tammile Goodman, Chuck Goodner, Patti Junghanns, Carla Landis, Amy Mears, David Moore, Carolyn Murphy, Merlene Payne, Gina Pierce-Holmes, Lane Pruett, Jamie Smith, Brenda Struble, April Taylor, Pat Thompson, Gerald Tucker, Teresa Zachary.

New Business – Item(s) that could not have been foreseen or known about at the time agenda was posted.

Vote to adjourn

Area FD Keep Busy, Over The Weekend

Pond Creek Fire Department and mutual aide from Carrier, Nash, Hawley, Hunter and Kremlin responded to a Sunday grass and structure fire 4.5 of a mile south of four-corners on US 81.

The fire started on the south side of the drive on property belonging to Don Stout and spread to a near by feed storage shed which was a total loss. It is not known have the fire started.

Heavy smoke caused dense visibility on US 81 for traffic until the fire was under control.

Duck season is closed. Conservation Order Light Goose Season (COLGS) open until March 30. For zone maps and complete waterfowl hunting regulations log on to wildlifedepartment.com

NORTHEAST

Ft. Gibson: Lake level is 2.18 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. Due to the extreme high water through the summer and early fall the vegetation is in poor shape. Their are some agricultural crops in the area. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low, with low success.

Webber Falls : Lake level is 2.73 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair, with smartweed, barnyardgrass, bidens, cut soybeans, corn, milo in area and wheat in area. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low, with low success.

With a 78 percent majority, Medford voters said “yes” to Medford Public Schools technology upgrades.

The final tally in Tuesday’s election to upgrade technology at the elementary and secondary school sites was 269 in favor and 74 opposed.

The $590,000 bond issue also will replace the current heating system in the school gymnasium, as well as resurface the track.

A Grant County Election Board spokeswoman said while 343 people cast ballots on Tuesday’s election, close to 1,000 individuals could have voted.

The bond will raise taxes about 3.48 percent over five years.

State Health Department Launches Redesigned Web Site

Public Health Information Portal

The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) has launched a new redesigned Web site with a focus on creating a one-stop public health information center for the citizens of Oklahoma. The redesigned Web site replaces the agency's old Web site using the services of OK.gov, the state's official Web portal.

"We are excited about the potential services this new redesigned Web site will allow us to provide the citizens of Oklahoma," said Secretary of Health and Commissioner of Health Dr. Mike Crutcher.

The newly designed OSDH Public Health Information Portal, www.health.ok.gov, offers a more professional Web presence to the public with many new and improved user-friendly features including the following:

- User-oriented navigation system helping citizens find what they need quickly.

- Improved search engine function through OK.gov's Google search application.

- Print and e-mail buttons on Web pages for quicker processing of information.

- Improved graphics and cleaner layout enhancing readability and promoting a consistent look and feel throughout the site.

Upcoming features of the OSDH Public Health Information Portal will include credit card payment modules, which will allow citizens the ability to pay for many health department services online.

Also on this web site you can fine Nursing Home health inspection and Grant County restaurant health inspection, Along with rath of public information for here in Grant County.

The National Transportation Safety Board released their final probable Cause report February 28 involving the plane crash on December 20th 2007 at Medford airport. It states as follows;

The private pilot attempted a night landing on an unlighted runway. Prior to landing, he said he tried to activate the runway lights, but was unable to turn the lights on. The pilot noted that since there was moonlight and he was familiar with the airport; he elected to land without the runway lights. He reported that he thought he could see the runway, and that he was on the runway, until "he felt the nose-wheel sink." The airplane came to rest inverted.

An inspection of the runway lighting system revealed that the lights were not functioning properly.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's decision to attempt a night landing without runway lighting. A contributing factor was inoperative runway lights.

A Pond Creek man, Joey Grant Hays Jr., 20, was charged in Grant County district court February 28, with one felony count of furnishing alcoholic beverage to a minor, and one misdemeanor count of furnishing low-point beer to any person under the are of 21.

According to court records, on January 18th Joey Hays Jr. furnish alcoholic and 3.2 beer to a person who was under the age of twenty-one at his residents in Pond Creek.

These crimes are punishable by a fine of not less then $2,500 and or imprisonment from one to five years.

It’s decision time for Med-ford School District patrons. On Tuesday, polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. to decide the fate of a $590,000 bond issue for Medford Public Schools.

If approved, the bond would provide technology upgrades at both the elementary and high school sites, including new computers, servers, software and other equipment.

The bond also would allow for the replacement of the current heating system in the school gymnasium and re-placement of the current running surface on the track.

The bond would raise taxes approximately 3.48 percent, so if a taxpayer’s amount was $100 this year, it would be $103.48 next year.

The payment schedule for the bond is five years.

Polling places are regular voting precincts.

The Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported a tornado touchdown just south of Manchester in Grant County, near the Kansas state line. The OHP said numerous power lines were downed in the area and a barn has been destroyed.

Oklahoma 132 was closed Sunday night north of Oklahoma 11 because of eight downed power poles.

A dispatcher at the Grant County Sheriff’s office, said the amount of damage still was being assessed Sunday night.

Severe Thunderstorm Watch remains valid until 8 PM CST this

evening for the following areas

In Oklahoma this watch includes 7 counties

In northern Oklahoma

Garfield, Grant, Kay, and

Noble

In northwest Oklahoma

Alfalfa Harper Woods

This includes the cities of... Alva... Buffalo... Cherokee... Enid...

Medford... Perry and Ponca City.

Cold air will deepen over the region behind a cold front. The

front will pass through northwest portions of Oklahoma before

midnight... and the rest of the area overnight and early Monday

morning. Although most of the snow activity will be located over

the northwest half of Oklahoma through Monday morning...

A vacant house in Hunter was still smoldering Saturday morning after fire destroyed the structure Friday evening.

According to a Hunter resident, the house had been unoccupied for approximately 4 years and the yard had grown up with weeds and brush.

Hunter and Pond Creek fire departments responded to the structure fire.

Garfield county deputies and OHP troopers were called to Hunter to help with traffic control, to help emergency equipment access the fire scene.

The origin of the fire is under investigation.

A large round hay bale in a field on the black top west of Hunter reminds us of the coming of Easter and the resurrection of Christ.

The selenite crystal dig area on Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge will not open in April this year. Vials of chemicals were found in the area in April 2007. The area will remain closed until an investigation of the area can be completed. However, the remainder of the refuge's public access sites will be open. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct a public meeting to provide details of the investigation of the Crystal Digging Area at the Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge. The meeting will be Thursday, March 6, from 6-8 p.m. in the auditorium of the Cherokee High School, 512 E. Fifth St in Cherokee, Okla. The Crystal Digging Area occupies approximately 300 of the 18,000 acres that comprised the former Great Salt Plains Bombing Range, a formerly used defense site located near Cherokee, Okla.

In April 2007, a visitor at the Crystal Digging Area uncovered a vial from a chemical agent identification set (CAIS) while digging for crystals. Due to this discovery, the Crystal Digging Area was closed to the public.

Subsequent investigation by the Army resulted in recovery and disposal of 162 vials from one area. The remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) will determine if CAIS or munition hazards remain in the Crystal Digging Area. The RI/FS will evaluate the potential for additional CAIS burial areas, and if such burial areas are located, effective remedial alternatives will be developed. The Army and Fish and Wildlife Service’s number-one priority at this site is the safety of visitors.

"At least 30,000 visitors arrive at the salt flats each year to dig selenite crystals," said Jon Brock, manager of Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge. "We’re disappointed that the site remains closed, but public safety is our primary concern. The last thing we want is for someone to be injured while exploring this part of the refuge."

Formerly used defense sites were used by the military to train Soldiers, Airmen, Sailors and Marines as well as to test new weapons and warfare capabilities. From 1942-1946, U.S. Army Air Corps pilots practiced bombing and gunnery at the Great Salt Plains Bombing Range.

Two Charged in Illegal Rancho El Nevado Horse Track Investigation

Two Texas men face charges including racketeering, conspiracy and commercial gambling for allegedly operating an unlicensed, illegal Love County horse racing track called Rancho El Nevado, Attorney General Drew Edmondson said.

Arturo Cavazos and Juan Antonio Lopez are accused of one count of conspiracy, two counts of commercial gambling, two counts of charging an admission fee to an unlicensed horse racing track, two counts of making a thing of value available for use in a criminal offense and one count of racketeering. The charges were filed yesterday in Love County District Court.

Cavazos, 43, owns the land on which the track is located and Lopez, 41, serves as race organizer. According to the state’s charges, illegal races were run at the track from July 2004 to August 2007.

The state also alleges the track operated card and dice games in addition to the illegal races.

Edmondson’s office is prosecuting Cavazos and Lopez in cooperation with Love County District Attorney Craig Ladd and the Oklahoma Horse Racing Commission.

Rancho El Nevado is the second illegal horse racing facility the state has investigated in Love County. Almost 20 people have pleaded guilty in connection with the state’s ongoing investigation into the Red River Playground.

Firefighters from over northwest Oklahoma and southern Kansas battled a grass fire on the Grant and Alfalfa county line, that lasted most of Monday and into the evening hours.

Over twenty-six fire departments from five Oklahoma counties, Woods, major, Alfalfa, Garfield, Grant, and two Kansas counties, Barber and Harper along with other private agencies’ battled the raging grass fire or provided much needed water to battle the fire, Monday February 25.

The fire started north of the Byron Fish Hatchery and spread southeastward until it reach Oklahoma 11 around 4:00 p.m. Monday afternoon.

40 mile per hour prevailing winds from the NNW, tall dry grass and tress added fuel that helped march the fire over several miles of wildlife inhabited land.

Oklahoma 11 was closed at 11 and 132 to traffic because of heavy smoke and the need to use the highway for refilling brush rigs with water.

Burlington Coop provided fuel at the scene to refuel brush rigs that had become low on fuel fighting the fire.

Graders and Bull Dozer from Grant and Alfalfa counties help build firebreaks and push trees in an attempt to quite the flames.

The Red Cross and the Nescatunga Rescue unit served sandwiches and drinks to weary firefighters during the fire.

Pond Creek ambulance responded to be on stand-by on Oklahoma 11, in case of injuries.

Most of the FD had been released by dark.

A truck driver, Alvis Joe Bradford, Jr. Wakita, hauling crude oil for CMT Marketing and Transporting escaped serious injury Monday when the Freightliner he was driving rolled on its side on Red Hill Road around noon Monday, February 25.

According to the accident report from OHP trooper Steve Spark, at the accident scene, Bradford was southbound on Red Hill Road and for unknown reasons the tankers right side-wheels slipped off the roadway pulling the Freightliner into the west bar-ditch laying the tanker loaded with crude oil, on its side.

Bradford was transported to Bass hospital in Enid by Pond Creek EMS personal, where he was treated and released according to a Bass spokesperson Monday evening.

Picture;

Danny Easterly, Pond Creek Assistant Fire Chief, is shown standing-by, in case of an oil spill from of a Freightliner loaded with crude oil while the wreckage is being removed from Red Hill Road.

A Lamont man, Jody Jay Holeman, 31, has been charged in Kay county district court with one felony count of possession of controlled substance, a second offense after a former convention of two or more, and two misdemeanor counts of driving under the influence and resisting an officer.

According to the affidavit filed in charges, on February 16, 2008 officer John Sanders of the Tonkawa police department observed a black Chevrolet 1976 pickup fail to stop at a stop sign on N. 4th St. in Tonkawa.

According to the affidavit, when officer Sanders approached the vehicle and made, contact with driver the affidavit stated the officer immediately detected a strong odor of alcohol coming Holeman’s breath. Holeman told the officer he had only had “two beers” When Sanders asked Holeman to step out of the pickup he was unbalanced when he stood up, the affidavit stated.

The officer then noticed a clip-on knife in his right pocket. Then Sanders started to pat him down to see if Holeman had, any other weapons on him Holeman took off running.

A foot pursuit then followed, Holeman was chased into a field where Holeman began fighting Sanders. The fight ended when Sanders used pepper spray in Holeman’s eyes.

Holeman was then escorted back to the patrol car. A search of the pickup revealed a small wooden box containing a green leafy substance and a “one-inch pipe.

According to court records, Holeman told Sanders later “Boss, I did not fight you” He then stated to Sanders he was running from the box and was afraid of going back to prison.

Holeman is due back in court on APRIL 18, 2008. He was released on bond.

Meeting scheduled to gather public input on wind power policy

A public meeting will be held in Woodward to gather input from hunters and other wildlife enthusiasts about the possible lease or sale of Cooper Wildlife Management Area for wind power development.

The meeting will be held Wed., March 12, at 6 p.m. at the High Plains Technology Center . The Wildlife Conservation Commission, the governing board that sets policy for the Department of Wildlife Conservation, has created a subcommittee to look at wind power issues and make a recommendation to the full Commission regarding specific offers the Wildlife Department may receive for purchase or lease of its properties.

“We have a letter of interest from OG&E about Cooper. The Commission is looking at this issue closely because it is a policy decision that could impact several other areas in western Oklahoma that are owned by the Department,” said Greg Duffy, Wildlife Department director.

“For people who are interested in voicing their opinion but will be unable to attend the meeting in Woodward, we would encourage them to go to our Web site and email us their comments. We will compile all comments and make sure that they are presented to the Wildlife Commission.”

The Wildlife Department’s Web site can be accessed at wildlifedepartment.com.

FISHING REPORT FOR FEBRUARY 20, 2008

CENTRAL

Arcadia : Elevation normal, water clear. White bass being caught on chartreuse jigs. Channel catfish being caught on cut shad. Crappie being caught on chartreuse jigs around heated docks and on white jigs and minnows. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Hefner: Elevation below normal, water clear. Crappie being caught around the heated dock on chartreuse jigs. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

NORTEAST

Birch: Elevation normal, water in the lower 40s and clear. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 15-30 ft. around brush piles. Blue catfish fair on cut shad at 30-40 ft. fishing flats near the creeks channels. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits around brush structure and in creek channels. Catfish fair on cut bait on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at fishing docks and around brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Kaw: Elevation slightly above normal and murky. Crappie fair using minnows and jigs at 20-25 ft. over deep water brush piles. Hybrid striped bass and striped bass fair on bucktail jigs and sassy shads below the dam, eastside. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Keystone: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass slow on crankbaits, jigs and chunkbaits at 10-15 ft. around points at coves with creeks. Smallmouth bass slow on finesse jigs at 10-15 ft. around points at coves with creeks. Spotted bass slow on small crankbaits at 10-15 ft. in main lake pockets and coves. White bass slow on minnows and jigging spoons at 20-30 ft. around ledges along river channel. Striped bass fair on bucktails and jerk baits at 3-6 ft. below dam. Channel catfish fair on chicken liver and worms at 8-12 ft. in creeks. Blue catfish fair on cut shad at 10-20 ft. in mouths of coves. Flathead catfish slow on large shiners and live shad at 15-20 ft. in main lake bluffs and coves with bluffs. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows at 15-25 ft. near ledges along creek and river channels. Walleye slow on large shiners and jerk baits at 4-8 ft. in holes downstream below dam to Riverside Drive . Saugeye slow on small jigs and blackhead minnows at 4-8 ft. in holes downstream below dam to Riverside Drive . Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Lower Illinois: Trout good on black #18 midges, #14 copper Johns, Streamers, Bead headed Prince's.

Oologah: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water in the lower 40s and clear. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 15-20 ft. around brush piles. Striped bass hybrids, walleye and crappie fair on jigs below the dam. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Pawhuska Lake : Elevation normal, water in the upper 30s and clear. Trout excellent on power bait, mini-marshmallows, homemade bait and corn and fair on super dupers and little cleos at 3-12 ft. Spotted bass are being caught on bucktail jigs at 5-15 ft. near drop offs. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Skiatook: Elevation normal, water in the upper 30s and clear. Crappie fair on large minnows along creek channels with standing timber. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: Fishing fair to good on ghost minnows and sassy shad and on topwater lures in the evening. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Tenkiller: Elevation 3 ft. above normal and stained. Crappie fair in brush at 20-25 ft. on tube jigs, and around docks at 10-15 ft. on minnows or 1/32nd oz. jigs. Sunfish fair around docks on worm-tipped jigs. Report submitted by Monte Brooks, Cookson Village Resort.

Webbers Falls : Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits in riprap and creek channels. Catfish good on cut baits and stinkbaits in creek channels and on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and tube jigs at brush structure and around bridges. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton : Elevation normal. Crappie fair along dam near brush. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle : Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 46-49 and stained. Crappie being caught around shelters and drop-offs near dam. White bass good along channel drop-offs up creeks. Bass fair to good on crankbaits, drop-shot and Carolina rigs. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River : Elevation normal, water 45 and clear. Largemouth bass slow on minnows and flies. Channel catfish fair on liver and worms. Trout good on power baits, super dupers, roostertails and mealworms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Elevation rising, water 49 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on spoons and deep-running crankbaits around islands and off points. Catfish good on juglines and trotlines with cut bait. Crappie fair on minnows or jigs around structure in the upper end of the lake. Walleye good in the upper end of the lake staging at 40-45 ft. on deep running crankbaits. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 1 ft. below normal and clear. Largemouth bass and white bass slow. Blue catfish fair on fresh shad drifting the flats. Crappie good along riprap around I-40 and around boat docks over sunken brush piles at 10-20 ft. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation 3 1/2 ft. above normal, water 46. White bass and crappie fair on jigs and trolling shad-colored crankbaits in the upper Kiamichi River channel. Largemouth bass slow on jigs and slow rolled spinnerbaits along the drop-offs. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 54 and clear. Largemouth bass good on plastic worms along points and weed beds at 15 ft. White bass and hybrid striped bass good on crankbaits and jigs in the discharge canal at 15 ft. Report submitted by Darrell Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

Lower Mountain Fork River : Trout good on tiny flies and very light tippets. Most popular flies have been quite small and the color red has been very productive. Two-fly rigs seem to be the favorite method using flies such as Soft Hackles, Zebra Midges, UFO and Disco Midge. Report submitted by Beavers Bend Fly Shop.

McGee Creek: Elevation 2 ft. above normal, water 47 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastic lures and jig and pig at 16-30 ft. over submerged humps. Crappie fair on minnows at 16-25 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Pine Creek: Elevation below normal, water clear. Bass good on red shad-colored soft plastics. Crappie fair on minnows. Catfish fair on beef blood magic bait. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation below normal, water 48 and stained. Largemouth bass slow on plastic baits and jigs at 7-8 ft. around wood and rock structure next to deeper water. Crappie fair on minnows at 10 ft. in the old creek channels. White bass slow on jigs at 10 ft. below Webbers Falls dam. Blue catfish good on fresh cut bait at 6-10 ft. along the windy shorelines. Walleye and sauger fair on jigs and minnows fishing below Webbers Falls dam. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden stationed in Haskell County .

Sardis Lake : Bass good to fair on plastics around points and mouths of creek channels and around riprap. Crappie good off of Jack Fork bridge with minnows. Catfish good on cut bait fishing deep on flats near creek channels. White bass fair around mouths on creek channels or if schools of shad can be located. Walleye slow to fair on warmer days around islands and riprap. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 47 and clear. Striped bass fair on live bait at 10-20 ft. in the coves. Channel and blue catfish fair on live minnows at 10-15 ft. in the upper Red River . Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation 8 1/2 ft. above normal and murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on soft plastic baits. Crappie good with minnows and jigs. Channel catfish and blue catfish good on cut shad. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 5 ft. below normal and rising. Crappie and walleye poor. Trout fishing very good on corn in the river. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal and murky. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Foss: Elevation normal, water 42 and clear. Hybrid striped bass fair in deep water on slabs. Crappie good around fish house with baby bass jigs. Catfish fair. Walleye slow. Report submitted By Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Ft. Cobb : Elevation 1 1/4 ft. above normal. Crappie slow to fair around marina and boat slips. Catfish slow to fair on cut baits. Report submitted by James Edwards Jr., game warden stationed in Caddo County .

Medford and Wakita fire departments responded to an early morning oil well fire, five miles north of Clyde Thursday morning at 7:05 a.m. February 21.

“Lighting apparently struck two tank batteries on the GAW oil well site during the night when a band of sleet showers passed through our area,” said Dennis Brittain, Medford fire chief. “One of the tanks was steel and the other involved was fiberglass. Medford and Wakita FD worked together to first cool the burning tanks and then applied a layer of firefighting foam to smother the fire,” said Brittain.

The foam unit used is a piece of equipment that was recently added to Medford’s fire department, it was purchased with Grant County Emergency Sales tax monies,” stated Brittain.

The full Moon is going to get totally eclipsed on the night of February 20–21, putting on a gorgeous show as it glides through Earth's shadow. Skywatchers in nearly the entire Western Hemisphere will get an excellent view.

In America, the eclipse happens during convenient evening hours on Wednesday, the 20th, when people are up and about. In the time zones of Europe and West Africa, the eclipse happens during the early-morning hours of Thursday, the 21st.

It’s not just rabbits that multiply like rabbits. Thousands of kittens and puppies are born every hour in the United States. While these animals are adorable, the fate of most of them is not. Spaying or neutering is the most effective way to ensure their offspring won’t be born only to die prematurely and without a family.

It is estimated that more than 70,000 kittens and puppies are born each day in the United States. Between 6 and 8 million dogs and cats enter animal shelters across the United States each year. Of these, approximately 3 to 4 million are euthanized. It costs taxpayers in the United States several billion dollars each year to house and euthanize unwanted animals.

To decrease these numbers, the last Tuesday of February has been designated “Spay Day USA,” a program of the Doris Day Animal Foundation and its official partner, Pets911.

Spay Day USA is a national campaign to end the killing of healthy, adoptable animals by promoting the many life-saving benefits of spay/neuter.

More than 1,366,000 cats, dogs and other animals have been spayed or neutered since 1995, thanks to Spay Day USA participants. This program has saved millions of animal lives and taxpayer dollars. Spay Day USA 2007 participants spayed or neutered an estimated 21,000 cats, dogs and rabbits nationwide.

Spaying is the surgical sterilization of a female animal by removing the ovaries, oviduct and uterus. Neutering is the surgical sterilization of a male animal by removing the testicles.

Frank Frantz—Republican—served from 1906 to 1907, the last territorial governor. He was born on May 7, 1872, at Roanoke, Illinois, and educated there. He made his home in Medford shortly after the opening of the Cherokee Outlet. He served with the “Rough Riders” under Colonel Theodore Roosevelt. After the Spanish‑American War he moved to Enid, Oklahoma, where he was named postmaster from 1901 to 1903. He served as Indian agent of the Osage Agency until he assumed the office of governor on January 13, 1906, and remain in office until statehood on November 16, 1907. He lost as the Republican candidate in the first state gubernatorial election. Until his death on March 9, 1941, he was in the oil business. He is buried in Memorial Park Cemetery in Tulsa.

ORDINANCE NO. 4.37

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MEDFORD, GRANT COUNTY, OKLAHOMA PROVIDING SIZE RESTRICTIONS FOR LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS TANKS IN RESIDENTIAL AREAS, PROVIDING FOR PENALTY, REPEALING ALL OTHER ORDINANCES AND PARTS OF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH, AND DECLARING AN EMEGENCY.

BE IT ORDAINED, by the Mayor and the City Council of the City of Medford, Grant County, Oklahoma.

SECTION I. Whereas, the City of Medford has adopted the 1988 edition of the Standard Fire Code and all appendixes thereto by reference, and

SECTION II. Whereas, it is in the best interest of the City of Medford and the citizens thereof, to prohibit the use and/or storage of Liquefied Petroleum Gas Tanks in residential areas, and

SECTION III. Use and/or storage of Liquefied Petroleum Gas Tanks in residential areas shall be limited to two tanks. The tanks will be limited in size to no larger than seven (7) gallon or thirty (30) pound tanks.

SECTION IV. The Medford Fire Chief, Asst. Fire Chief or any duly appointed designee of the Fire Chief, shall serve as inspectors of the Liquefied Petroleum Gas Tanks.

SECTION V. INCONSISTENCY. In the event any of the terms and provisions of any other ordinance or regulation of the City are inconsistent with the terms and provisions of this Ordinance, the terms and provisions of this Ordinance shall govern and control.

SECTION VI. PENALTY. Violation of this ordinance shall be a violation of the Medford City Code and subject to a fine of $100.00 for each violation.

SECTION VII. EMERGENCY. WHEREAS, it being immediately necessary for the preservation of the peace, health and safety, and public good of the City of Medford, Oklahoma, and the inhabitants thereof, that the provisions of this Ordinance be put into full force and effect, an emergency is hereby declared to exist by reason whereof this Ordinance shall take effect and be in full force from and after its passage, as provided by law.

PASSED AND APPROVED by the City Council of the City of Medford, Grant County, Oklahoma this 10th day of April 2006.

Kevin Kilian was appointed by the board to fill the vacant board seat.
In reading “Clue Me In” by Korina Schineider in the North Center Reporter this week, it was very surprising to know that not one on Medford’s Chamber of Commerce members realized that yes in deed there is a recycling drop-off center and it is within 19 miles of Grant county. There is a recycling center in Caldwell Kansas. It was started by a group of concern Caldwell citizens and has been in operation quite sometime.

Station Owner Charged with Price Gouging

A Tulsa man is accused today of price gouging during the December ice storms after an investigation by the attorney general’s Consumer Protection Unit.

Mohammed Mannan, 38, was charged today in Tulsa County District Court with three misdemeanor counts of violating the Oklahoma Emergency Price Stabilization Act.

The charges were filed after three consumers contacted the attorney general’s office to report that the price of gas at a station owned by Mannan jumped from $2.69 to $3.29 after a state of emergency was declared in December.

Mannan is the owner and operator of the M&F Mart located at 3025 S. Memorial in Tulsa.

“Under Oklahoma law, once an emergency has been declared business owners can not artificially raise the price of necessary goods and services more than 10 percent above the pre-emergency price,” Attorney General Drew Edmondson said. “Based on the pre-emergency price of $2.69, the maximum increase allowed by law once the declaration was issued was 26 cents. Mr. Mannan allegedly raised his price by 60 cents.”

If convicted, Mannan could face up to a year in prison and a $1,000 fine for each count.

The attorney general’s office received 90 consumer calls and 39 formal complaints regarding price gouging following the December ice storms. The complaints include prices on hotel rooms, gasoline and generators.

“We will continue to investigate these complaints on a case-by-case basis,” Edmondson said. “There may well be additional cases filed.”

Judge Ronald Franklin in Grant County district court Monday morning during a motion for summary judgment hearing handed down a decision, ruling against ONEOK. Granting the summary motion for Grant County.

Stating the Grant county Assessor followed the state law, in penalizing ONEOK for the $110,000 when they did not meet the April 15, deadline in producing required documentation.

Judge Ronald Franklin ruled against a change of venue for George Gilchrist, Wakita, in Grant County district court Monday morning during a motion hearing, after Gillchrist’s attorney augured his client could not received a far and impartial trial in Grant County because of media coverage and of personal knowledge of Gilchrest in the Grant county community. Gilchrist’s attorney was asking the jury trial be changed to Garfield County where a larger jury pool could be selected from.

The Grant county Sheriff’s department discovered and seized six horses that had hip, backbone and ribs significantly protruding from their body, according to an affidavit. The horses appeared to be in very poor and malnourished health conditions, and they were in (imminent) danger of death.

Grant County Sheriff’s Office deputies found carcasses of about 34 domestic animals and a number of other decaying carcasses and bones, according to the affidavit.

The pasture where the animals were kept had no grass or any kind of vegetation growing on the ground, the affidavit stated.

Cindy Bobbitt, Grant County Commissioner, District 2, has completed the Advanced I Accreditation portion of the County Commissioner certification/accreditation program conducted by the County Officers Training Program at Oklahoma State University.

The Association of County Commissioners of Oklahoma (ACCO) instituted a voluntary certification program in 2000, which comprises an initial basic level of five courses. Bobbitt received the County Commissioner Basic Accreditation November 2006.

In 2001, the program was revised to include an advanced level, which requires 48 hours of coursework, with three required courses and other discretionary courses chosen from a selection of fourteen at the discretion of the county employee in order to meet the number of hours.

In 2005, a second advanced level was added, which requires an additional 36 hours of coursework. Bobbitt has already began working towards accreditation for the second advanced level.

FISHING REPORT FOR FEBRUARY 6, 2008.

CENTRAL

Arcadia: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad. Crappie good on minnows and chartreuse jigs at heated dock. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Hefner: Elevation below normal, water clear. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad. Crappie good on minnows and red and white jigs at dock. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

Overholser: Elevation normal, water clear. White bass good on white grubs. Channel and blue catfish good on cut shad. Crappie good on minnows in rocks. Report submitted by Tim Campbell, game warden stationed in Oklahoma County .

NORTHEAST

Birch: Elevation normal, water in the middle 30s and clear. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush piles at 20-30 ft. Channel and blue catfish fair on cut bait in main channels at 30-40 ft.. Report submitted by Spencer Grace, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Eucha: Elevation slightly above normal, water 47 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows at 14-16 ft. around brush and structure. Largemouth bass fair on jerk baits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Ft. Gibson: Elevation 4 ft. above normal, water 35 and murky. Largemouth bass fair in deep water around dropoffs at 20-25 ft. Crappie good on jigs and minnows at 15-20 ft. around docks and brush piles. Report submitted by Marvin Stanley, game warden stationed in Wagoner County .

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits along shoreline and in creek channels. Catfish fair on cut bait and stinkbaits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around fishing dock and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Kaw: Elevation 3 ft. above normal, water 35 and murky. Crappie good over deep brush piles at 20-30 ft. on 1/16 oz. chartreuse and black or red and black tube jigs. Fish are not in every brush pile, so you have to "search and move" if you are not catching fish on a particular brush pile. Blue catfish fair on juglines in main lake channels using shad. Blues are also being caught below the dam when generation is occurring. Report submitted by Tracy Daniel, game warden stationed in Kay County .

Keystone: Elevation 1/10 ft. below normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on jigs, chunk baits and big crankbaits at 8-12 ft. around points at the mouths of creeks and coves. Smallmouth bass fair on finesse jigs at 8-12 ft. in deep coves with secondary points. Spotted bass fair on small jigs and crankbaits at 8-12 ft. around bluffs and main lake pockets. White bass fair on minnows and jigging spoons at 15-25 ft. in main lake river channel and bends. Striped bass fair on bucktails and jerk baits at 3-6 ft. below dam. Channel catfish slow on chicken livers and worms at 8-12 ft. in creeks. Blue catfish fair on cut shad at 25-35 ft. at humps along river channel and mouths of coves. Flathead catfish slow on live shad at 15-25 ft. around bluffs and steep banks near mouth of deep coves. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows at 12-25 ft. around ledges, docks and bluffs. Walleye and saugeye fair on minnows and jerk baits at 4-8 ft. in holes below dam from Swift Park to I-44 Bridge in Tulsa . Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Oologah: Elevation 1 ft. above normal and falling, water in mid-40's to near 50 and clear. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush piles at 15-20 ft. Blue catfish fair on shad drifting flats near the river channel at 20-25 ft. Walleye and striped bass hybrids fair on jigs below the dam. Report submitted by Brek Henry, game warden stationed in Rogers County .

Pawhuska Lake: Elevation slightly below normal, water in lower 30's and clear. Trout fair on power bait and home-made bait and casting chartreuse and yellow super dupers and rooster tails at 5-15 ft. Submitted by Spencer Grace, State Game Warden for Osage County

Skiatook: Elevation normal, water low to mid-30’s and clear. Crappie fair on minnows in creek channels. Report submitted by Paul Welch, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Sooner: Striped bass hybrids and white bass fair on sassy shad in the discharge. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Spavinaw: Elevation slightly above normal, water 42 and murky. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around the dam area. Largemouth bass fair on jerk baits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Webbers Falls: Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits along riprap and in creek channels. Catfish good on cut bait on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at brush structure and bridges. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near deep brush along dam. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 43 and down stained. Crappie being caught around brush piles around the dam. White bass slow. Largemouth bass slow, due to the windy, cold weather. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 50 and clear. Largemouth bass slow on minnows and flies. Channel catfish fair on liver and worms. Trout good on power bait, super dupers, rooster tails and mealworms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on spoons on jig and pig around rocky points and structure. Channel catfish fair on juglines and trotlines baited with shad. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs around structure in the upper end of the lake. Walleye fair on deep running crankbaits. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. below normal and clear. Largemouth bass and white bass slow. Blue catfish fair on fresh shad in deep creek channels. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 8-20 ft. around boat docks over brush piles. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water 48. Crappie fair on minnows at 15-25 ft. in channels and timber. Blue cats fair on cut bait. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 49 and clear. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits in weed beds and off points at 5-8 ft. White bass and hybrid striped bass fair on minnows and jigs in the discharge channel at 15 ft. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

McGee Creek: Elevation 8 inches below normal, water 48 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastic lures and jig and pig at 16-30 ft. over submerged humps. Crappie fair on minnows at 16-25 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Pine Creek: Elevation below normal and clear. Bass good on red shad colored soft plastics. Crappie good on jigs and minnows. Catfish fair to good on liver, garlic punchbait and cut shad at the old bridge and at the spillway. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation below normal, water 46 and murky. Largemouth bass slow on plastic baits and jigs at 8 ft. fishing the rock and woody structure next to deeper water. Crappie fair at 10 ft. on minnows up Big Sans Bois and Dirty creek. White bass slow on jigs at 10 ft. below Webbers Falls and Kerr dams. Blue catfish good on fresh cut bait at 8-10 ft. next to old creek channels. Flathead catfish fair using live bait on trotlines and juglines at 20-30 ft.. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden for Haskell County .

Sardis Lake: Elevation normal. Bass good on plastics on flats and points especially warmer afternoons. Catfish good on jugs using cut bait on flats near creek channels at 20-35 ft. Crappie excellent around the tower using minnows suspended from bottom and jigs. Walleye slow. White bass good on spoons around flats and points. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 46 and clear. Striped bass fair on live bait at 15-20 ft. in the coves. Channel and blue catfish fair on live minnows from 10-15 ft. north of the Hwy 70 Bridge. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 5-10 ft. around boat docks. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation below normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on soft plastic baits. Crappie good on minnows and jigs below the dam in the old river channel. Channel and blue and catfish good on cut shad below dam and on jug lines baited with liver in lake. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game Warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 6 ft. below normal and rising. Crappie and walleye poor to fair. Trout good in river, hitting on corn. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal water murky. Crappie fair at Ralph's Resort on minnows and jigs. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Foss: Elevation normal, water 41 and clear. Gates closed. Crappie fair around south side with red thunder baby shad. Striped bass hybrids slow. Walleye and saugeye slow. Catfish fair. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Lawtonka: Elevation above normal. Crappie fair on minnows off the dam. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Tom Steed: Elevation normal, water murky. Crappie and walleye slow to fair at 20-24 ft. over brush piles. Report submitted by David Smith, game warden stationed in Kiowa County .

The Deer Creek Volunteer Fire Department hosted a Chili, and Chicken and Noodle dinner Friday evening February 1. The event is an annual fundraiser for the department and proceeds are used to help defray cost to update and replace equipment. The dinner was a prelude to the Basketball games that started at 6:30 when the DCLA Eagles took on the Cherokee Chiefs.

Left to right Jennifer Hankla, Chance Hankla, Dennis Coufal, and Ken Gaskill. Members of the Deer Creek Fire department are pictured servicing.

The Medford community celebrated the Grant Opening of a new business Saturday morning February 2 with the ribbon cutting for the Precision Lumber & Supply, owner Jeromy Schneider.

The new business will sell a variety of hardware, lawn and garden supplies, lumber, hand tools, electrical and pluming supplies. ”If the store doesn’t have what a customers needs store staff will order it.” said Schneider

The Nash Volunteer Fire Department held their annual Ground hog Supper Saturday February 2nd. As always the event was a huge success as has been since the fundraiser began in the early 1970's. Cost of the meal was by donations to the department. Proceeds are used to help defray cost to update and replace equipment for the Fire department.

NORTHWEST

Ft. Supply : Lake level is 0.54 ft above normal. Habitat conditions around the lake are poor to fair. Local wheat crops in the area range from good to poor condition. Duck numbers are good, with mostly divers. Goose numbers are fair. Hunting activity is low, with no reports of success. Bird movement in the area has been low, but should increase with forecasted cold fronts.

PERSONAL INJURY COLLISION OCCURRED AT 1457 HOURS ON 2/04/08 ON US 64,

13

WEST OF ALVA IN

WOODS COUNTY.

A 2007 CHEVY, DRIVEN BY ANTHONY TODD,

41 EDMOND, OKLAHOMA WAS TRANSPORTED BY WOODS COUNTY EMS TO

SHARE MEDICAL IN ALVA AND FLOWN BY EAGLE MED TO OU MEDICAL

IN OKLAHOMA CITY, WHERE HE WAS ADMITTED WITH HEAD NECK TRUNK -

INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL, ARM AND LEG INJURIES. HE WAS LISTED IN

SERIOUS CONDITION

TODD WAS EAST BOUND ON US 64, 3/4 OF A MILE

WEST OF SH 14

WHEN HE ATTEMPTED TO PASS A SEMI IN A NO PASSING ZONE. HE THEN SWERVED

TOWARDS

THE SOUTH DITCH TO AVOID VEHICLE TWO. VEHICLE TWO ALSO STARTED TO THE

SOUTH DITCH.

TO AVOID THE COLLISION. VEHICLE ONE THEN OVERCORRECTED IN AN ATTEMPT TO

REENTER THE

ROADWAY. VEHICLE ONE THEN WENT AIRBORNE BEFORE ROLLING 3/4'S OF A TURN

AND FLIPPING

END OVER END. VEHICLE CAME TO REST ON ITS WHEELS. DRIVER WAS EJECTED

OUT THE BACK

WINDOW AND CAME TO REST 45 FEET FROM THE POINT OF REST OF VEHICLE ONE.

SEATBELTS: EQUIPPED, NOT IN USE

ROADWAY: 2 LANE/PAVED/DRY

WEATHER: CLEAR

PINNED: NO

EJECTED: 45 FEET FROM POINT OF REST VEHICLE ONE

DOT# VEHICLE 2 UNDER INVESTIGATION

DOT# VEHICLE 3 UNDER INVESTIGATION

CONDITION OF DRIVER: #1 (APPARENTLY NORMAL

CAUSE OF COLLISION: #62 (IMPROPER OVERTAKING IN A MARKED

ZONE)

INVESTIGATED BY: TROOPER RANDY MCCULLOUGH OF THE WOODS COUNTY

DETACHMENT.

ASSISTED BY: WOODS COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE, ALVA FIRE AND RESCUE, ALVA

EMS AND

OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION.

In his sixth annual State of the State address to the Oklahoma State Legislature, Gov. Brad Henry outlined a broad agenda to strengthen education, create jobs, improve healthcare, toughen public safety and diversify the state’s economy.

The Governor urged lawmakers to set their sights on Oklahoma’s long-term future, now that the state has moved past its 2007 centennial celebration.

“The centennial is over, but the story of Oklahoma continues -- a story that is bold and reinvigorated, a new beginning for a state constantly evolving,” he told the second session of the Oklahoma 51st Legislature.

“What we do now will set the course for our future. It’s time to build on the successes that you and I have accomplished together during the past five years. Our actions this session will buttress the unshakable foundation of our second century of statehood.”

Gov. Henry unveiled a number of proposals to move Oklahoma forward and bolster its economic competitiveness in the global marketplace of the 21st century. Those initiatives range from keeping the state’s commitment to raise teacher pay to the regional average to a permanent funding mechanism for the EDGE Research Endowment.

Stressing that challenges and opportunities typically go hand in hand in Oklahoma, the Governor said it is important for legislators to find consensus on such issues as education, economic development, healthcare, transportation and public safety.

“We cannot move forward by pushing back,” he said.

“We must set aside partisan bickering and reactionary politics. The people of Oklahoma have nothing to gain from petty quarrels, and our time is too precious to waste in gridlock. Press releases are short-lived, but cooperation and constructive action resonate for generations.

“The year of our Centennial is over. We have celebrated the history and heritage that gives us our identity. We have praised the men and women whose dreams and determination built the state we love. It is time to look to the future. That future begins today.”

Gov. Henry also praised the courage and commitment of Oklahoma troops serving overseas in Iraq and Afghanistan. In addition, he recognized a special guest in the House gallery, third-grade teacher Valorie Lewis. USA Today recently recognized the Stigler teacher as one of the top 20 educators in the nation.

In recent weeks, Gov. Henry has released details of his comprehensive agenda for the legislative session, which will run until Friday, May 30. Today, the Governor also presented legislators with his proposed executive budget for Fiscal Year 2009, which includes further information on his agenda for education, health care, public safety, economic development and job creation.

Amber Alert Issued for Kansas Boy

Posted: Sunday February 3 6:00 PM CT

The Kansas Bureau of Investigation issued the Amber Alert after the boy was apparently abducted in Kansas city. The boy's mother and younger sibling were found dead Sunday morning and the suspect is considered armed and dangerous.

Seth Guerrero is a 3 year old Hispanic male with brown eyes and brown hair.

The suspect is Andrew Anthony Guerrero, a 23 year old white/Hispanic male, 5'9" tall, 170 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes.

The suspect vehicle is a silver 2004 Saturn SUV with a Kansas license tag of XTY-310.

Anyone with information is asked to call the Kansas City Police Department at 913-596-3000C or dial 911.

Gov. Henry modifies burn ban

February 01, 2008

Citing recent precipitation and the advice of fire experts, Gov. Brad Henry modified the state’s burn ban, lifting burn prohibitions for all but 25 counties in the panhandle and southwestern Oklahoma.

The governor also issued an additional safety warning, telling Oklahomans not to burn if winds are in excess of 15 miles per hour.

“I am urging all Oklahomans to exercise caution and good common sense when it comes to outdoor burning, particularly when winds are gusty,” said Gov. Henry.

“The snow and rain have reduced the fire threat in many areas, and we want to be sensitive to those counties and individuals who are still trying to dispose of brush and tree limbs left by the December ice storm. However, if conditions worsen and the fire danger increases in the weeks to come, I will not hesitate to expand the burn ban to protect lives and property.”

The governor’s office announced the decision this afternoon after reviewing precipitation totals and other fire data compiled by forestry officials in the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture. The agency recommended the ban be modified, citing the significant snow and rainfall earlier this week.

The burn ban is lifted for all but the following 25 counties in the panhandle and southwestern Oklahoma: Atoka, Beaver, Beckham, Bryan, Caddo, Carter, Cimarron, Comanche, Cotton, Garvin, Grady, Greer, Harmon, Jackson, Jefferson, Johnston, Kiowa, Love, Marshall, McClain, Murray, Stephens, Texas, Tillman and Washita.

Violations of the ban are misdemeanors punishable by as much as a $500 fine and one-year imprisonment.

The Grant County Board of Commissioners will hold their regular meeting February 4 starting at 9 a.m.

Items on the agenda are as followers;

A. payment of purchase orders and travel claims.

B. Transfer of Appropriations.

C. Blanket Purchase Orders

D. Accept Resignation of Executive Ass/Safety Director, Sherri Eulberg.

E. Discuss opening of Commissioners Executive Ass/safety Director position.

F. Road Crossing permit for Casillas Petroleum in District 3.

G. Adjust Road Crossing Permit Fee to align weith other counties.

H. Officer Monthly reports

I. Election Board Salary Reimbursement Claim.

J. Resolution for disposing of equipment for all districts‘.

K. Grant County hazard Mitigation Plan update and notice of intent approval.

L. Certificates of farming use or state or local government use with Farmers Grain

M. Road Crossing permit from Marsau Enterprise, SE 25-8-14.

N. Appoint trustee to Mead Cemetery Board.

ROBERT LEWIS RAMSEY

A memorial service for Robert Lewis Ramsey, 82, of Medford, will be 11 a.m. Tuesday at First Christian Church, Medford. The Rev. Craig VanDeburgh will officiate. Burial will be in Rosemound Cemetery, Medford. Military honors will be conducted by the Navy. Ar-rangements are by Hills-Ely Funeral Home, Medford.

He was born Nov. 24, 1925, in Enid to John Quincy and Romolia Claudine Widdows Ramsey and died Friday, Feb. 1, 2008, at Servant Living Center, Medford.

He attended school in Grenola, Kan., and he was presented his high school diploma from Medford High School in 2005. He entered the Navy during World War II on Dec. 8, 1942, and was honorably discharged Feb. 19, 1946. He was quartermaster 3rd class and served on USS Medrick in Asiatic-Pacific campaign. He received an Asiatic-Pacific campaign medal with one bronze service star. He married Lora Belle Scott in 1964, in Medford. He worked as service station manager at Clyde Co-Op Association and was a volunteer fireman. He was a member of First Christian Church, Veterans of Foreign Wars and Odd Fellows Lodge.

Surviving are his daughter, Robin Wilson of Medford; his son, Jerry Stout of Bay Town, Texas; six grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by one brother.

Memorials may be made through the funeral home, P. O. Box 280, Medford, OK 73759 to an educational fund for Robin’s children.

Phill Says It's Not Over Yet!

Brace yourself for more wintry weather. Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow Saturday, leading the groundhog to forecast six more weeks of winter.

The rodent was pulled from his stump by members of the Punxsutawney Groundhog Club Inner Circle, top-hat- and tuxedo-wearing businessmen who carry out the tradition.

Each Feb. 2, thousands of people descend on Punxsutawney, a town of about 6,100 people some 65 miles northeast of Pittsburgh, to celebrate what had essentially been a German superstition.

The tradition is that if a hibernating animal sees a shadow on Feb. 2 — the Christian holiday of Candlemas — winter will last another six weeks. If no shadow is seen, legend says spring will come early.

Light goose season approaching

Goose hunters have an opportunity to extend the hunting season and benefit Arctic waterfowl breeding grounds at the same time thanks to the Conservation Order Light Goose Season (COLGS), designed to reduce the mid-continent light goose population. The season opens Feb. 18 and runs through March 30.

The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation has cooperated with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to establish the COLGS in Oklahoma because high populations of light geese, including snow, blue and Ross' geese, have been causing severe habitat destruction to their Arctic breeding grounds.

“The COLGS is a unique opportunity to spend additional time in the field enjoying Oklahoma ’s great outdoors,” said Mike O’Meilia, migratory game bird biologist for the Wildlife Department. “The season also helps maintain healthier numbers of light geese while reducing their damage to breeding grounds in the Arctic .”

More agricultural crops in the south-central United States means snow geese are living longer and reproducing more, and their overpopulation continues to degrade Arctic habitat. Because snow geese feed by grubbing and pulling out plants by the roots, large numbers can literally destroy extensive areas of tundra.

There are no daily or possession limits on light geese during COLGS, and shooting hours are extended for the season to one half hour after sunset. Waterfowlers also can use electronic calls and unplugged shotguns to increase their chances.

Hunters who participate in the COLGS must use only federally-approved, nontoxic shot as well as have all necessary licenses, waterfowl stamps and a Harvest Information Program (HIP) Permit in their possession while hunting. For complete license information, see the "2007-08 Oklahoma Waterfowl Guide" or log on to wildlifedepartment.com.

Federal law requires that the Wildlife Department estimate the harvest of light geese during the Conservation Order Light Goose Season. Hunters who plan to pursue snow, blue and Ross' geese during COLGS are asked to register with the Department and provide their name, address and telephone number so a harvest survey can be administered when the COLGS ends.

Hunters can register for the season by logging on to wildlifedepartment.com, or they can mail a letter or postcard to: Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation; Attn: COLGS; P.O. Box 53465 ; Oklahoma City , OK 73152 .

A Winter Storm Warning remains in effect from 6 am to 6 PM CST

Thursday for most of northern and west central Oklahoma...

generally north of Interstate 40.

Snow is expected to spread quickly over much of west-central...

central and northern Oklahoma very late tonight or Thursday

morning. The heaviest accumulations of 4 to 7 inches are expected

to be over north- central Oklahoma... mainly north of a line from

Clinton to Stillwater. Amounts will decrease farther south...

with around 2 to 4 inches possible through much of the Interstate 40

corridor. Considerable blowing and drifting snow will be likely...

resulting in hazardous travel conditions due to higher drifts and

low visibility. East- west oriented roadways will be affected the

most by the drifting snow. Local whiteout conditions will be

possible.

The snow is expected to taper off by mid to late afternoon as the

upper level storm system begins to exit the area.

This Winter Storm Warning means significant amounts of snow and

blowing snow are expected or occurring. Strong winds are also

likely. This will make travel very hazardous or impossible.

Arrangements have been made for the 2008 Medford high school traveling reunion. Blocks of rooms have been reserved at the Courtyard by-Marriott-OKCNW. Oklahoma City for Friday April 18, 2008 and Saturday April 19, 20008. Reservations may be made by calling 1- 405-848-0808, or 1-800-321-2211 the Marriott Reservation Line. Be sure to specify the Medford High School Traveling Reunion to receive the special rates. Reservations must be made by April 5, All MHS graduates are invited to the reunion.

For additional information, please contact Warren & Carol Beggs in Medford or George and Barbara Pietz-Newton or Leroy and Marlene Ciskowski-Boyer in Oklahoma City.

Dorothey Lively is alive and well. She contacted the Ponca City Police Sunday morning after seeing her picture and an article in The Ponca City News. An officer met with her and Lively explained she was resolving some personal issues.

By CALVIN WATKINS / The Dallas Morning News

cwatkins@dallasnews.com

MOBILE, Ala. – The front-runner to become a major voice in the Cowboys' scouting operation is a familiar face.

Tom Ciskowski, the Cowboys' assistant director of college scouting, has worked for the team since 1992. Cowboys owner and general manager Jerry Jones said Ciskowski, 53, is the obvious choice to replace Jeff Ireland as the team's vice president of college and pro scouting.

Ciskowski's convictions pushed Dallas to draft Larry Allen out of tiny Sonoma State in 1994.

The Cowboys were considering trading out of the second round of the '94 draft when Ciskowski pleaded against it.

Ciskowski, then an area scout, wanted Dallas to draft Allen.

With about 20 minutes left before it was time to make a selection, Ciskowski and then offensive line coach Hudson Houck went into the film room and studied Allen. After the film session, Ciskowski and Houck told Jones to take Allen.

Allen played for the Cowboys for 12 years and is probably headed to the Hall of Fame as one of the greatest offensive linemen of his generation.

"Tom sometimes really fights for a guy, sometimes to a fault," said Larry Lacewell, former director of pro and college scouting for the Cowboys. "A lot of people were questioning taking Larry Allen, strange as it seems, before we took him."

Just months away from another draft, Jones has decisions to make regarding the Cowboys' scouting departments.

Ireland is now the general manager in Miami.

Brian Gaine, the assistant director of pro scouting, left for Miami as well.

Remaining is Ciskowski.

When Ireland was promoted three years ago to run the Cowboys' college and pro scouting departments, Ciskowski, who declined to comment for this story, was also considered.

"I do want to emphasize, he was a very close consideration when we promoted Jeff Ireland," Jones said of Ciskowski. "Larry [Lacewell] was on the fence between Jeff and Tom, and we decided to go with Jeff."

Ireland has nothing but praise for Ciskowski.

"Tom is a diligent worker, and he understands how to build a team, and the draft is the way to do it," Ireland said. "He's been around football a long time. When it comes to evaluators of talent, he knows what you're looking for. You give him a blueprint, he can follow it."

Ciskowski spent 15 years as an assistant coach, starting at Pawhuska High School in Pawhuska, Okla. He also worked for several collegiate programs, including Oklahoma State, Miami, New Mexico and UNLV, filling a variety of roles.

RON BASELICE / DMN

Tom Ciskowski joined the Dallas Cowboys at the recommendation of former coach Jimmy Johnson. In 1992, then Cowboys coach Jimmy Johnson, who knew Ciskowski from his time as a college coach, recommended him to Lacewell.

"You don't tell Jimmy no," Lacewell said. "I didn't know Tom that well, but Jimmy really wanted him."

Ciskowski joined the Cowboys as a scout administrator for the combine. The next year, he was an area scout, and from 1998 to 2000, he scouted the Southeast. Over the last seven seasons, Ciskowski has been the assistant director of college scouting.

Former Cowboys coach Dave Campo, now the assistant head coach in Jacksonville, said Ciskowski's experience as an assistant coach helps him find talent.

"He knows an athlete when he sees one," Campo said. "He certainly deserves [a promotion]."

Effective January 29, 2008 All Counties in Oklahoma are under a Burn Ban.

Citing high winds, dry conditions and a series of recent wildfires, Gov. Brad Henry today declared a statewide burn ban for Oklahoma.

The governor’s office announced the decision Tuesday afternoon after reviewing weather data and discussing fire conditions with forestry officials in the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture.

“We need to do everything we can to protect lives and property,” said Gov. Henry. “With the dry weather and high winds, conditions are very hazardous and even the smallest fire can quickly get out of control.

“I’m urging all Oklahomans to exercise caution and use common sense. A burn ban won’t prevent every fire, but it will help lessen the danger.”

In recent days, a variety of factors have increased fire danger across the state. High winds and low humidity have created optimum conditions for wildfires, and the record rains of 2007 helped produce an abundance of vegetation that is now serving as fuel for fires. Fallen tree limbs from last month’s ice storm are also contributing to the danger in addition to hindering firefighting efforts.

“I would prefer to err on the side of caution and issue the ban before conditions deteriorate any further. It may cause a small inconvenience for some Oklahomans, but it will also help reduce the number of dangerous fires and possibly save lives in the process,” said the governor.

“With high winds and the large amount of dormant vegetation and tree limbs on the ground, our firefighters are already laboring in very dangerous conditions. The ban will provide them some much-needed assistance.”

Under the governor’s executive order, outdoor burning is banned, but there are some exemptions for low risk activities such as charcoal and gas grilling. Occupations such as welding can also be exempt provided tradesmen follow specific protections outlined by the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture.

Violations of the ban are misdemeanors punishable by as much as a $500 fine and one-year imprisonment.

*** This is the factual investigation report and is based on information furnished by the Pilot/Operator. Additional details may be found in the Form 6120.1***. One additional probable cause report will be available in one month according to the NTSB spokesperson.

Factual Accident

The 1,196-hour private pilot, who reported having accumulated 22 hours in make and model, attempted a

night landing on an unlighted runway. The pilot stated that he left the departure airport a bit

later than planned, and therefore his arrival at the accident airport, was about 1900. Prior to

landing, the pilot tried to activate the runway lights, but was unable to turn the lights on. The

pilot added, that since there was moonlight and he was familiar with the airport; he would attempt a

landing before diverting to another airfield. The pilot also reported that he thought he could see

the runway, and he was on the runway until, "he felt the nose-wheel sink". The airplane subsequently

came to rest in an inverted position, and the pilot and passengers were able to exit the airplane

unassisted. An inspection of the runway lighting system revealed that the lights were not

functioning properly.

0 0 2

0 0 1

22

1196

12/2007

Class 3

Airplane

Commercial; Single-engine Land

Visual Conditions

Night

Part 91: General Aviation

Lamont, OK

Don Kirby

3D Well Service

None

Substantial

Continental / IO-520

Reciprocating

Retractable - Tricycle

21058957

Cessna / 210

Airplane (not Home-built)

Medford, OK

HOBBS, NM

1900 CST

12/20/2007

Medford, OK

The Medford Chamber of Commerce met on Monday, January 28th at noon in the Community Room. Members present were Steve Voss, Amanda Ball, Keith Hawkins, Bart Brashears, Debbie Kretchmar, Renee Scates, Barbara Bush, Harvey Bush, Jeanette Cromwell, Dea Kretchmar, Margie Jackson, Marla Cline, Bill Loch, Jeannette Loch, and Korina Schneider.

Discussion was held on the three new businesses opening in Medford which are Precision Lumber and Supply, Deb’s Design, and Steggs Aerial Spraying. Open houses will be held to welcome each business to town. Discussion was held on the installation of the sound system. Permission has been granted by the downtown businesses to install the cables and speakers on the buildings. The sound system will be installed as soon as the weather clears.

The Chamber would like to sponsor a city-wide garage sale. The tentative date will be April 26th. Plans are to give yard signs to those participating and to have their name and address printed in the newspaper and on signs around town. More details will be finalized at the next chamber meeting.

The Chamber is interested in coordinating a recycling program. Members will be asking around to neighboring communities to help get information on how they operate their programs and where recyclables can be taken.

Other programs discussed at the meeting were membership recruitment, business spotlights, chamber dues, and the upcoming Legislative Forum.

Beginning in March, the Chamber will be hosting “Chamber After Hours.” The first date for this will be March 3rd at Bank 7. Only Chamber members will be allowed to attend. Businesses sponsoring “Chamber After Hours” will get a chance to showcase their business and socialize with those in attendance. Chamber members will provide finger foods and the host business will provide drinks. This event will be held every other month in the evenings while the regular business meeting will be held on alternating months with a sack lunch noon meeting in the Community Room. This event is designed to bring chamber members together to network socially about Medford businesses.

Anyone interested in joining the Chamber can contact Dea or Barbara at City Hall. Dues are now due and payable by March 15th. We would love to have you visit a chamber meeting; maybe afterwards, you’ll be convinced to join.

Police Seeking Assistance In Search for Missing Woman

Dorothey Lea Lively, 45, has been missing for several months. Police are looking for anyone who may have seen her since September 2007.

Lively was reported missing by her former boyfriend. He told Ponca City Police that she had contacted one of their three sons in September and that was the last time that he knew anyone had spoken to her.

Lively is a former employee of ASC and worked there until last September.

Her vehicle, a White 2005 Pontiac Grand Am 4-door tag number KJM-033 has not been located, either.

Her last known address was 1516 North Osage Street. Her neighbors report not having seen her in quite some time.

Dorothey Lea Lively is described as a white female with dark blonde hair, hazel eyes, 5 feet 7 inches tall, weighing approximately 150 pounds. She wears glasses and false teeth.

Dorothey Lively and her vehicle, by tag number and the vehicle identification number, have been entered into NCIC, a national data base for law enforcement use.

Anyone knowing the location of Dorothey Lively is asked to call the Ponca City Area Crime Stoppers at 762-5100 or the Ponca City Police Department at 767-0370.

Information may also be sent by e-mail to crimestoppers@poncacity.com. You will remain anonymous and you may receive a reward of up to $1,000.

The Board of Grant County Commissioners met at 1:00 P.M. during their regular meeting Monday afternoon. Only one Item was on the agenda to be discussed; 1. Consider applications for commissioners secretary. The meeting was called to order at that time Cindy Bobbitt board chairman called the meeting void, Commissioners Cindy Bobbitt and Max Hess then voted to adjourn.

Questions had arisen about the commissioners’ secretary applications what was scheduled to be discussed during the meeting, in not following proper procedures. In order to handle the controversy the meeting was voted void.

A Sunday trip for a Medford resident to Medford’s burn pile turned out to be counterproductive. A limb trail could be followed starting on south 3rd street, then along US 81 and ending at the burn pile. Traffic had to go around the limbs that had been lost on the trip to their finally designation. A secured load could save a life or at the very least scratches on a vehicle.

The funeral for Twila Maurine Early, 97, of Medford, will be 10 a.m. Saturday at First Christian Church of Medford. The Rev. Craig VanDeburgh will officiate. Burial will be in Rosemound Cemetery, Medford. Arrangements are by Hills-Ely Funeral Home, Medford.

PERSONAL INJURY COLLISION OCCURRED AT 1940 HOURS ON 01/24/08, 4 MILES

EAST OF SH 8 ON US 64 IN ALFALFA COUNTY.

VEHICLE ONE: DRIVEN BY KAREN R. MONCRIEF, 69 CHEROKEE, OKLAHOMA. TRANSPORTED BY HELENA EMS TO

ST. MARY'S HOSPITAL IN ENID WITH HEAD, NECK, TRUNK, LEG AND ARM

EXTERNAL INJURIES. LISTED IN STABLE CONDITION.

VEHICLE ONE WAS WEST BOUND ON US 64 WHEN THE DRIVER

ATTEMPTED TO ADJUST THE RADIO AND LOST CONTROL OF THE VEHICLE. VEHICLE

TRAVELED OFF THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE ROADWAY. DRIVER OVERCORRECTED,

REENTERED RO ROADWAY, OVERCORRECTED AGAIN AND EXITED THE ROADWAY. VEHICLE

STRUCK THE SOUTH DITCH CAUSING IT TO ROLL 1 1/4 TIMES BEFORE COMING TO

REST.

BRINGING VEHICLE BACK ONTO ROADWAY.

SEATBELTS: EQUIPPED, IN USE

ROADWAY: 2 LANE/DRY/PAVED

WEATHER: CLEAR

PINNED: NO

EJECTED: NO

CONDITION OF DRIVER:..................................01 (APPARENTLY

NORMAL)

CAUSE OF COLLISION:

DISTRACTION INSIDE VEHICLE

INVESTIGATED BY TROOPER RANDAL MCCULLOUGH #672 OF THE WOODS COUNTY

DETACHMENT.

ASSISTED BY JET FIRE AND RESCUE, HELENA FIRE AND RESCUE, CHEROKEE FIRE

AND

RESCUE

AND ALFALFA COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE.

Soulek Enter Guilty Plea; Sentencing Set

An Oklahoma City home repairman accused of bilking Oklahoma consumers out of more than $16,000 pleaded guilty today in Oklahoma County District Court, Attorney General Drew Edmondson said.

Alfred Soulek, 58, pleaded guilty today to six counts of violating the Oklahoma Consumer Protection Act after the attorney general’s Consumer Protection Unit found Soulek had defrauded at least six consumers who paid him to install windows and vinyl siding at their residences.

“We allege Alfred Soulek took substantial down payments from these consumers and then failed to perform the work as promised,” Edmondson said. “I am hopeful that we may now be able to provide restitution for these consumers.”

Soulek operated his business under the name A-1 Windows and Siding.

Soulek could face up to 10 years imprisonment and up to a $5,000 fine for each count. He is scheduled to be sentenced at 9 a.m. March 19 in Oklahoma County District Court.

Edmondson’s Consumer Protection Unit has statewide jurisdiction to investigate and prosecute violations of the state’s Consumer Protection Act. Anyone with information regarding suspected fraud or scams can contact the attorney general’s consumer protection hotline at (405) 521-2029.

District Attorney Cathy Stocker met with Grant County Commissioners, Phillip Mc Coy, County Assessor, and Grant County Excise board members, during the county commissioners’ regular January 24 meeting to discuss controversy over the need for outside counsel involving a Civil Judgment suite of an $110,000 penalty assessed to ONEOK in April of 2007.

During the meeting Thursday morning, Stocker explained she was not aware of the civil suite until Steve Young, Grant county ADA, approached her, with concerns Grant county officials were having about legal fees from hiring outside counsel to represent them. In addition, that it was the contention of county official that the district attorney’s office should be representing them in this matter.

Stocker explained that when she looked over the civil case file she understood why Melissa Blanton former ADA for Grant County would recommend the case turned over to Tisdal Law firm.

“First of all, Civil Judgment cases are not our department’s expertise.” In addition, Stocker added “a prior contract was in place between Grant County and the Tisdal law Firm for the purpose of certain ad valorem issues with regard to property.” said Stocker.

The last contract with the Tisdal law Firm signed July 2, 2007. By commissioners Max Hess, Cindy Bobbitt, and Jerry Shaffer. On July 3, ADA Melissa Blanton signed the contract for Cathy Stocker District Attorney.

“In cases as this you need to be able to fight fire with fire and Mart Tisdal can do this for you,” stated John Scott to county officials during the meeting, Scott, has been associated the District attorney’s office for over 8 years.

Stocker told Grant county officials, the DA’s department would handle the civil suite if that were their decision, but that their office is not responsible, nor can they by law, hire outside counsel.

The Tisdal law firm has already accumulated $5,000 in fees. An additional fee of $2,000 is expected when a motion for summary judgment is to be heard before Judge Franklin Feb. 11, at 9:00 a.m. in the Grant County district court. During the hearing Feb. 11 it is possible, a final decision will be handed down by Judge Ronald Franklin in this litigation.

After the hearing, Feb 11 County commissioners will then make the decision whether or not to retain Mart Tisdal as outside counsel or turn the suite over to the DA’s office.

Grant County Commissioners explained to Stocker that Blanton did not come to them to get their final approval for the Tisdal Law firm to represent. That Blanton should have explained her position and let them decide who they wanted to handle the litigation, Tisdal or the District attorney. Therefore, they should not be held responsible for outside counsel fees.

ONEOK was penalized $110,000 by the Grant County Assessor’s office, after not turning in required documentation by the deadline of April 15, for personal property assessment regarding the Medford plant. Attorney’s for ONEOK are protesting the penalty in Grant County district court.

COLLISION OCCURRED AT 13:11 HOURS ON 01-21-08 ON US177 AT THE KAY/NOBLE

COUNTY LINE LOCATED 5 MILES SOUTH OF PONCA CITY.

VEHICLE #1: 1993 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE DRIVEN BY CHRIS GEORGE SFRAGIDAS,

31, OF PONCA CITY, OK. TRANSPORTED BY AMBULANCE TO VIA CHRISTIE

HOSPITAL IN PONCA CITY IN GOOD CONDITION WITH HEAD AND TRUNK INTERNAL

INJURIES.

PASSENGER #1: TAYLOR L. ADAMS, 15, OF PONCA CITY, OK.

TRANSPORTED BY EAGLEMED FROM THE SCENE TO OU MEDICAL CENTER IN OKLAHOMA

CITY IN CRITICAL CONDITION WITH HEAD, ARM, LEG, TRUNK INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL

INJURIES.

PASSENGER #2: BEN P. WATERS, 24, OF PONCA CITY, OK.

TRANSPORTED BY AMBULANCE TO VIA CHRISTIE HOSPITAL IN PONCA CITY IN STABLE

CONDITION WITH HEAD, ARM AND TRUNK INTERNAL INJURIES.

PASSENGER #3: TADD L. MERRITT, 15, OF PONCA CITY, OK.

PRONOUNCED DEAD AT THE SCENE FROM MASSIVE INJURIES. TRANSPORTED TO GRACE

MEMORIAL FUNERAL HOME IN PONCA CITY, OK.

VEHICLE #2: 2007 KENWORTH TRACTOR-TRAILER DRIVEN BY ROBERT W. AIKIN, 54, OF TERRE HAUTE, IN. NOT INJURED.

WHAT HAPPENED: VEHICLE #1 WAS WESTBOUND ON COUNTY LINE ROAD. VEHICLE #2

WAS SOUTHBOUND ON US177. VEHICLE #1 FAILED TO YIELD FROM A STOP SIGN AND

PULLED INTO THE PATH OF VEHICLE #2 AND WAS STRUCK IN THE PASSENGER DOORS BY

THE FRONT OF VEHICLE #2. PASSENGER #1 OF VEHICLE #1 WAS PINNED FOR

APPROXIMATELY 20 MINUTES. PASSENGER #2 OF VEHICLE #1 WAS PINNED FOR

APPROXIMATELY 30 MINUTES. PASSENGER #3 OF VEHICLE #1 WAS PINNED FOR

APPROXIMATELY 2 HOURS.

SEATBELTS: EQUIPPED, NOT IN USE BY ANY OCCUPANT OF VEHICLE #1, IN USE

VEHICLE #2

AIRBAG: NOT EQUIPPED

ROADWAY: 2 LANE ASPHALT, DRY

WEATHER: CLOUDS PRESENT

PINNED: YES

EJECTED: NONE

CAUSE OF COLLISION: FAILURE TO YIELD

INVESTIGATED BY TROOPER CLAY FREDRICKSON #494 OF THE KAY COUNTY DETACHMENT.

ASSISTED BY TROOPER JUSTIN BARNEY #332 OF THE KAY COUNTY DETACHMENT,

TROOPER TODD HATCHETT #735 AND TROOPER BOBBY PARK #701 BOTH OF THE NOBLE

COUNTY DETACHMENT, LT. BOBBY HANKINS #121 AND LT. JEFF JAMES #150 BOTH

SUPERVISORS FOR TROOP K, TROOPER RANDY CLARK #329 OF THE SPECIAL

INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION, WHITE EAGLE POLICE DEPARTMENT, NOBLE COUNTY

SHERIFF'S OFFICE, KAY COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE, OTOE POLICE DEPARTMENT AND

PONCA CITY FIRE DEPARTMENT

Freezing drizzle and freezing rain possible tonight...

It's starting to look alot like winter again here in Grant County. A strong cold front located over northwest Oklahoma is pushing

south and southeast tonight. Temperatures immediately behind

the front will quickly fall into the upper 20s with a breezy

north wind. Shallow moisture ahead of the front will be lifted

as the front approaches which may result in areas of freezing

drizzle or very light freezing rain. An upper air disturbance

will also aid in the development of light rain or sleet across

parts of southern Oklahoma this afternoon and evening. Temperatures

across southeast Oklahoma are at or just above freezing so

light freezing rain may occur across this region into the

evening hours.

Precipitation amounts along and near the front are expected to

be very light... but still may cause a few slick spots

tonight... especially on bridges and overpasses. It is important

to remain informed of the latest weather condition and forecast

as this new round of cold air enters the Southern Plains

During a tornado in Ponca City, a man and his wife were carried aloft in their house by a tornado. The walls and roof were blown away. But the floor remained intact and eventually glided downward, setting the couple safely back on the ground.

Oklahoma has the largest American Indian population of any state. Many of the 252,420 American Indians living in Oklahoma today are descendants from the original 67 tribes inhabiting Indian Territory.

Willow Grace Morgan daughter of Terra (Clark)and Steve Morgan was born January 19th weighting 2 lbs 12 oz. and arriving two months early. Remember her in your prayers.
NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near brush piles around the Canadian area. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

Ft. Supply: Elevation 1 ft. above normal, water clear. Channel catfish fair on stinkbaits in shallow water off bank. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County .

Cold water angling to heat up at Lower Mountain Fork River

The Lower Mountain Fork River (LMFR) in Southeast Oklahoma is known as a trout angler’s paradise, and anglers are enjoying some hot fishing thanks to several supplemental trout stockings scheduled during the coming months.

“We usually stock trout every two weeks throughout the trout season at the Lower Mountain Fork River ,” said Jay Barfield, southeast region fisheries technician for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. “But this year we are able to provide an additional six stockings of fish to be released this winter and spring. That’s an additional 14,400 fish available for anglers to catch, and at about 11 inches each, they’re ready to be hooked by anglers as soon as they are released.”

The additional rainbow trout are being provided to the Wildlife Department by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to help offset the impacts caused by Broken Bow Dam on the LMFR. Wildlife Department personnel will transport the fish from the Greers Ferry National Fish Hatchery in Arkansas and then release them into the LMFR trout fishery, mostly between the State Park Dam and the US Route 70 bridge.

“There’s going to be about 2,400 trout released in each of the six supplemental stockings,” Barfield said. “We strive to provide the best trout angling possible on the Lower Mountain Fork River , and we are sure these trout will be a nice contribution to more than one angler’s success this season. We’ve already released some of these additional trout and will continue to do so for several weeks.”

The first supplemental stocking took place Jan. 10, and others are scheduled for Jan. 24, Feb. 14, 28 and March 13 and 27.

“One of the great things about this is that these stockings are in addition to the normal, by-weekly stockings that are on-going,” Barfield said. “What it comes down to is simply more fish for anglers to catch.”

To view the regular, bi-weekly trout stocking schedule and specific regulations for all the state’s trout waters, including the LMFR, log on to wildlifedepartment.com. The Web site also includes tips on how to catch trout as well as a wealth of information about the state’s streams restoration program, which works to provide healthy streams and better trout angling in Oklahoma .

Public Invited to Help Gov. Henry, United States Mint Launch Oklahoma’s Quarter at Jan. 28 Event

Oklahomans of all ages are invited to the official launch of the commemorative state quarter at a Monday, Jan. 28, kickoff in Oklahoma City’s Oklahoma History Center. Gov. Brad Henry and United States Mint Acting Deputy Director Dan Shaver will unveil the quarter at the 11 a.m. festivities. The quarter, the 46th of the United States Mint’s popular 50 State Quarters' Program, goes into nationwide circulation the same day.

“This is a momentous occasion for Oklahoma pride to shine from coast to coast,” Gov. Henry said. “It’s fitting that the launch of the commemorative quarter comes right on the heels of Oklahoma’s yearlong centennial celebration. I urge my fellow Oklahomans to come take part in this exciting event.”

The coin pays tribute to Oklahoma’s scenic beauty by boasting an illustration of the official state bird and the state wildflower. In a statewide online vote that drew more than 148,000 votes, Oklahomans overwhelmingly selected a design featuring the scissor-tailed flycatcher and the Gaillardia puchella, or Indian blanket.

People attending the Jan. 28 quarter launch will be able to purchase $10 rolls of the quarters (limit 10 rolls, cash only) or a special commemorative set for $5 (limit 5 sets, cash only). A free quarter will be given to each child under the age of 18 attending the launch. The state Department of Tourism and Recreation will provide free seed packets of Gaillardia, the state wildflower depicted on the commemorative coin.

Special guests include Centoonial creature Scissy the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher and United States Mint mascot Peter the Eagle. Music will be provided by the Putnam City North High School Jazz Band.

A structure fire was reported 1 north of Hillsdale at the residence belonging to J.C. Bowen. The fire began Sometime in the morning, within the garage that was attached to the house. The first Hillsdale units were able to get the fire out. According to a spokepersom from the Hawley fire department. The units from Nash and Hawley were used to check the attic and house for hot-spots. The garage received heavy smoke and fire damage. The family mini-van was also destroyed in the fire. The house received light smoke damage. There were no injuries as a result of the fire. The fire is still under investigation. Units from Hillsdale, Nash, Kremlin, Hawley and Drummond responded.

Salt Fork Bridge Receiving Check-up

Construction crew working on the Salt Fork River Bridge south of Medford on US 81 slowed traffic for most of the week.

“The bridgework is part of a larger 5-bridge project involving three counties Payne, Grant and Oklahoma,” stated Cole Hackett, spokesperson for ODOT. “The construction company was hire to do joint and seal maintenance, and the 5-bridge project should be finish in about three weeks.” Hackett added.

The Medford School received two very generous donations during the January 7 board meeting. $13,750 was donated Joe Kretchmar and $2,950 from Robert Gonzales, Gonzales Welding and Construction.

“The donation from Joe Kretchmar was for the purchase of the new scoreboards that have been installed in the gym and will be in use for homecoming Friday the 18th. “The donation by Robert Gonzales was for the purchase of a new score table that will be installed when it arrives.” said Mickey Geurkink, school Superintendent.

“On behalf of the school, we are very appreciative for these and the many other donations from the community. The support is greatly appreciated by our students and staff,” said Geurkink.

Grant County was among eight other counties in Oklahoma to receive approval from the Oklahoma Transportation Commission for a 13 county bridge project. The approval was made during the January 7 meeting.

The bridges are being built with county funds that are administed by ODOT with county crews doing the construction, other counties’ listed are; Carter, Cotton, Custer, Delaware, Lincoln, Rodgers, Sequoyah and Washington.

Ernie Lebeda passed away Jan 4th 2008
Grant County has a new Bar-B-Q restaurant. Joey Hayes and Kelly Donnell are the owners. The new restaurant is located in Pond Creek at 403 East Broadway. They serve finely smoked meats and all the fixings.
The world's first installed parking meter was in Oklahoma City, on July 16, 1935. Carl C. Magee, of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is generally credited with originating the parking meter. He filed for a patent for a "coin controlled parking meter" on May 13, 1935.

Oklahoma's state capitol building is the only capitol in the world with an oil well under it. Although its legal description is Capitol Site #1, it is referred to as Petunia #1 because it was originally drilled in the middle of a flower bed

50 States Reach Agreement with MySpace

Attorney General Drew Edmondson and the attorneys general for 49 other states announced an agreement with social networking site MySpace that should help protect kids from Internet predators.

Under the terms of the agreement, MySpace will work with attorneys general to lead an Internet Safety Technical Task Force, which will work to develop age and identity verification technology.

“We as parents and members of the law enforcement community have to adapt with the ever-changing technology,” Edmondson said. “As technology becomes more prevalent, so does the opportunity for predators to utilize it as a tool to track and victimize our children. Today’s agreement should lead to further protection for our kids.”

MySpace today also agreed to develop policies that will allow parents to submit their children’s email addresses to a list to prohibit the email address from being used to set up a MySpace account. The company will also make the default setting “private” for the Internet profiles of 16 and 17-year-old users. The private setting will ensure that only users approved by the profile’s owner will be able to view and post comments to that particular profile.

Additionally, MySpace has agreed to review and respond to inappropriate content and to commit the staff and resources necessary to do so. The company will also dedicate resources to educating children and parents about Internet safety.

Today’s agreement comes after more than two years of discussions between MySpace and attorneys general from across the country.

“The collaboration between the states and MySpace should serve as a model for other social networking sites,” Edmondson said. “The partnership between law enforcement and Internet social networking service providers could prove to be invaluable.

“We must not forget, however, that parents are truly on the front lines in the battle to protect children from Internet predators. I hope parents will talk to their kids about the dangers of the Internet and monitor Internet use within their own homes.”

Representatives from the Nash fire department met with Grant County Commissioners during their regular meeting January 14 to discuss and gain approval on phone quotes on purchasing a bed for a new Brush Rig they received through NODA. The bed cost was approved for $ 46,529. Also, approval for a single source Jaws of Life for their department for $17,335.20. Commissioners were then invited to view a pumper the department purchased last year from an Orangeburg New York fire department.

Where There's Smoke, There's Fire

Four Grant County fire departments Medford, Wakita, Nash, and Hawley, responded to extinguish a grass fire Sunday afternoon, one mile west of the Red Hill Road.

A control burn quickly turned into an intense out of control fire at the Donna Anderson residents when the family was attempting to clear around a garden spot.

The fire then quickly spread out of control to an adjacent pasture. The fire destroyed approximately 40 to 50 acres of grass at the same time destroying approximately 30 to 40 hay bales still in the field, according to fire officials.

Picture;

Hawley and Medford Brush Rigs pictured refilling with water from a Wakita tanker Sunday afternoon after a control burn at the Donna Anderson residents one mile west of the Red Hill Road quickly raged out of control and destroyed grassland and hay bales in an adjacent pasture.

John Benningfield, Dennis Brittain and Jeremy Brittain were the only three Medford firefighters that responded to the fire.

Mid-morning Friday January 11, Medford EMS personal was dispatched to Renfrow when two tractor-trailer rigs collided at the Farmers Grain elevator.

According to OHP Trooper Robert Cottrill’s investigative report. Both rigs were traveling north on US 81. The first semi driven by John Hoover, Hennessey, hauling grain was attempting to turn into the elevator. In order to do so, Hoover needed to make a broad turn, so he pulled off the road to the left. The second rig loaded with hogs, owned by the Hanor Company, Enid, saw the tractor-trailer pull off the highway thinking the driver was going to park. The Hanor driver then attempted to pass at the same time Hoover starting to make his broad turn into Farmers Grain. In an attempt to avoid the accident, the Hanor rig turned sharp to the right. The Hanor rig T-boned the grain rig on the drive of Farmers Grain.

According to the report, the accident was caused by an improper right turn. “The state law of Oklahoma says, when making a right turn you can not go left of center,” trooper Cottrill stated. “Even as in this saturation when this was the only way the driver could make this turn,” added Cottrill.

Hoover received a small cut to his forehead and refused transportation by the Medford ambulance personal.

Helping with the accident were Grant County under- Sheriff Tim Wilkerson and Deputy Jeremy Brittain.

Small game offers chance to keep hunting

Though some Oklahomans have put away their hunting gear until spring, there are still others who know that now is still a great time to be hunting almost anywhere in the state. Seasons such as quail, pheasant, rabbit and squirrel seasons are still open and offer endless hunting opportunities all over Oklahoma .

Quail season runs through Feb. 15, while pheasant season ends Jan. 31. Rabbit season remains open statewide until March 15, and squirrel until Jan. 31. Resident small game hunters only need a hunting license and a fishing and hunting legacy permit unless exempt, and residents age 15 and under are exempt from having to purchase a hunting license and fishing and hunting legacy permit.

Additionally, those age 16-35 who have not completed a hunter education course can hunt with a licensed adult hunter age 21 or older (or a licensed adult hunter age 21 years or older who is exempt from hunter education requirements) under certain conditions using the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation’s apprentice-designated hunting license.

For complete license information and guidelines regarding the apprentice-designated hunting license, consult the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide” or log on to wildlifedepartment.com. After obtaining the proper license, hunters only need a place to hunt. But when you consider that the Wildlife Department offers public hunting areas all across the state that often have minimal small game hunting pressure, finding a place to hunt is not a problem.

“Countless hunters have been introduced to the sport through small game hunting,” said Lance Meek, hunter education coordinator for the Wildlife Department. “It gives them a great opportunity to learn about hunting safety and ethics and to hone their outdoor skills.”

For bag limits and regulations on small game, consult the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide” or log on to wildlifedepartment.com.

Seasons on public lands may vary from statewide seasons, so hunters should consult wildlife management area regulations in the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide” before hunting. For more information on small game hunting in Oklahoma , log on to wildlifedepartment.com.

The Grant County Board of Commissioners has an immediate opening for an Executive Assistant. This position includes responsibilities for managing information, schedules and requirements for the Board of Commissioners, office workflow and maintaining financial records. Concurrent responsibilities include serving as both the Grant County Safety Director by facilitating monthly meetings educating County employees on safety issues and as the Grant County Health Insurance and Worker’s Compensation Administrator. This parallel responsibility includes maintaining health insurance and workers’ compensation records as well serving as a liaison to the Association of County Commissioners (ACCO) Workers’ Compensation departments and the Oklahoma Public Employees’ Health Insurance.

This is a demanding and dynamic work environment. The ideal candidate would be an organized, disciplined self-starter able to work on their own or with a team of elected officials delivering materials and programs on time and in a professional manner. Minimum requirements include an associate’s degree or two (2) years related clerical/administrative experience or training. Advanced computer skills with Microsoft Word and Excel applications are a must. Applicants are subject to a post-offer background check to determine eligibility for hire.

In 1998, a life size statue of a cattle drive, titled "On the Chisholm Trail," was set in place in Duncan as a monument to the American Cowboy.

Oklahoma was among the states hardest hit by the Great Depression and the drought that created the Dust Bowl in the 1930s.

AG Petitions Court to Stop Deceptive Pill Sales

A group of Internet pill peddlers may soon be forced to change their ways after Attorney General Drew Edmondson today filed a petition for a permanent injunction against the company in Oklahoma County District Court.

Pure Energy Labs, Inc. and three of the company’s executives, Darrin Clanton, Brian Forrester and Chris Wilson, were named in the state’s complaint after the attorney general’s office received more than 115 complaints from consumers regarding the company’s business practices.

“The total monetary loss claimed by these consumers is in excess of $13,000,” Edmondson said. “We hope to be able to recover that money on their behalf.”

The company, which is based in Oklahoma City, advertises and sells weight reduction and sexual enhancement drugs under the names Phentrazine, Vivetra, Fialafil and Intensa through newspaper and Internet advertising. Websites utilized by Pure Energy Labs include www.usaveonpills.com and www.thintabs.com.

“The consumers allegedly defrauded by Pure Energy thought they were signing up for a free sample of the products,” Edmondson said. “They were aware only that they would be charged a $4.95 shipping and handling fee. Instead, we allege they were automatically enrolled in a program where they would sometimes repeatedly be sent a 60-day supply of the product and charged $149.95.”

Additionally, the attorney general’s office alleges the company often continues to charge consumers who thought they had successfully terminated their membership in the program and that the cancellation process put in place by the company is unduly burdensome on consumers.

“Some consumers complained that even after they did stop the pills from coming, the company continued to regularly charge their bank accounts,” Edmondson said. “The cancellation process itself was nearly impossible, because the cancellation links on the company’s websites do not work.”

The attorney general’s office is seeking a permanent injunction to enjoin the company and its agents from engaging in future fraudulent conduct. The state is also asking the court to assess a civil penalty of up to $10,000 per violation, order restitution for the consumers harmed by the company and require Pure Energy to pay the state’s investigative and attorney fees.

Edmondson’s Consumer Protection Unit has statewide jurisdiction to investigate and prosecute violations of the state’s Consumer Protection Act. Anyone with information regarding suspected fraud or scams can contact the attorney general’s consumer protection hotline at (405) 521-2029.

Northwest

Canton: Lake level is 0.17 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair to poor. High water levels through out the spring limited native forage growth in shallow portions of the lake. Winter wheat is in good condition. Row crop fields in the area are in good to excellent condition. Duck numbers are moderate, mostly divers and mergansers. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low, with moderate success. Significant movement of birds out of the area has occurred in the last week possibly due to the unusual spring like weather conditions. The boat ramp west of the Wildlife Management Area headquarters is usable as is all boat ramps on the south side of the lake. The highway across the dam is closed due to construction activities in the spillway area.

Ft. Supply : Lake level is 0.39 ft above normal. Habitat conditions around the lake are fair. Local wheat crops in the area range from fair to poor in condition. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low, with no reports of success. Bird movement in the area has been low recently.

During the Grant County Board of Commissioners January 7, regular meeting the commissioners made their annual jail inspection. A new telephone system was added to the visitation room and in the jail area. Visitors can now use a telephone to talk to prisons instead of talking through small holes in the glass. Some painting and new flooring in the office area is in the process of being done. Minor repairs was needed also in the kitchen to the range and storage area. “The is an old building”, said Sheriff Roland Hula “But it is a workable building. Commissioners remarked on all the improvements that had been done on the jail and office area.

Sheriff Hula told the commissioners he has two new pickups and an Expedition arriving soon for his department

There has been a lot of information in the news recently about the "Super bacteria," MRSA (methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus),

In an effort to educate the local communities, Integris Blackwell Regional Hospital and Blackwell Family Medicine will be hosting a "Lunch & Learn" featuring Dr. Jeffrey Shuart in a discussion about MRSA with question and answer session on Tuesday, Jan. 29, at the American Red Cross in Blackwell. A free boxed lunch will be provided to those attending with prior RSVP. Contact Jordan Ihrig at 580-363-9310, as seating is limited.

Further information can be obtained from your primary care provider or from the following CDC website: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/pdf/ar/MRSAPatientInfoSheet.pdf

REGULAR MEETING AGENDA

MEDFORD BOARD OF EDUCATION

Monday, January 7, 2008

7:00 P.M Teachers Lounge 301 N. Main

Medford, Oklahoma 73759

Posted by Gloria Gonzales. Deputy Clerk

(NOTE): The Medford Board of Education may discus, vote to approve, vote to disapprove, vote to table or decide not to vote on any item on this agenda.

Call to order and recording of members present and absent to establish a quorum

Teacher’s report

Principal’s report

Superintendent’s report

Consent Agenda - (All of the following items, which concern reports and items of a routine nature normally approved at a board meeting, will be approved by one board vote, unless any board member desires to have a separate vote on any or all of these items. The consent agenda consists of the discussion, consideration, and approval of the following items):

Approve with corrections minutes of December 10, 2007 regular meeting and December 18, 2007 special meeting.

Approval of monthly financial reports ending January 4, 2008.

i. Treasurer’s cash balance report.

ii. Encumbrance and warrant registers in the general and building funds.

iii. School activity fund monthly summary.

iv. Transfer of $400.00 dollars from concessions to FCA.

Discussion, motion, and possible action to accept or reject the donation of $13,750 from Joe Kretchmar to the school district.

Discussion, motion, and possible action to accept or reject the donation of $2,950 from Gonzales Welding and Construction to the school district.

Motion, consideration and vote to enter into Executive Session to conduct the annual evaluation of the superintendent and discuss the Superintendent’s contract for the 2008-2009 school year. 25 O.S. §307 (B)(1)

Vote to convene or not to convene into executive session.

Vote to acknowledge the board has returned to open session.

Reading of executive session minutes compliance statement.

Discussion, motion and possible action to vote to re-employ or find reasons that may exist to not employ Mickey Geurkink as Superintendent for the 2008-2009 school year.

New Business – Item(s) that could not have been foreseen or known about at the time agenda was posted.

Vote to adjourn

If you are like a lot of us and forget, it is against Medford city code to blow your grass clipping in the street. The city of Medford has taken steps to correct your forgetfulness and recently purchase a street cleaner from the city of Blackwell. The war against grass, dirt, and leaves has begun.

Medford’s rainfall total for the last 90 days of 2007 was 4.99 according the Mesonet
With no one filing for the Medford School Board position Dec. 5 for the seat formally held by Delaine Reimer. A new member is expected to be appointed by the Board during the February meeting. “We have had a few people inquire about the position,” said Mickey Geurkink, School Superintend. “The Board will consider these names and a recommendation will be made and voted on by the board in February” stated Geurkink.

We are not sure where, how or why; just that 2007 has flown by. The days are past, time never again to find. The memories past, only baggage left behind.

As 2007 ends, the Oklahoma Centennial played a major part by all accounts’ and the celebration has been an exciting one. ODOT worked especially hard keeping our highways mowed and looking magnificent for the Centennial Celebration.

January was a snowy month starting around the 15th with what was call the “Marathon Ice Storm of 2007. The Marathon snowfall lasted off and on during most of the last part of the month. Including January 31 for the dedication of Medford’s Centennial Clock. It was a picturesque scene with huge snowflakes falling and seeing in the background the unveiling of a 1900’s style clock. If you missed the unveiling, you missed a beautiful part of Medford’s history.

The Oklahoma Centennial Chisholm Trail Cattle Drive Was sensational, it all most could be described as breathtaking.Many of Medford residents were involved in the planning and participated. Highlights of the drive included, crossing the Cimarron River, the Salt Fork River, the parades through towns, with the trail ending in Caldwell, KS. People from all parts of the world were reported visiting the camp in the evenings. The most repeated story of the drive was hearing of how Father Mike Wheelahan was tossed off Keith Hawkins wagon. Father Mike you need to hold tight and watch for the bumps.

Ending the Centennial Celebration in Medford was the placement of 2 benches one in front of the Medford Library and the other was placed next to the Centennial clock at Cherokee and 81.

On Statehood Day, November 16, the City of Medford held a reception serving Birthday Cake, in honor of Oklahoma’s 100th year. The 46th state

The end of the centennial year is bittersweet, I am somewhat sadden as it comes to an end.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY OKLAHOMA!

Grant County Board of Commissioners will meet Monday morning at 9:00 a. m. December 31 for their regular meeting. Items on the agenda to be discuss and possible action taken are;

A. Payment of purchase orders and travel claims

B. Transfer of appropriations

C. Blanket purchase orders

D. Donnie Head CED#8, re: Five year plan & Programming Resolution for all districts

E. Bridge inspection for district #3

F. Resign Juvenile Detention contract with Pottawatomie county

G. Designation of requesting officer for District Attorney’s office

H. BearCat Land, Inc., Mike Adelman re: Oil and Gas lease

I. Sign contract with Dirk County Clerk copier

J. Review phone quotes from Pond Creek ambulance for hydraulic cots

K. Acknowledge 1712 FEMA reimursements for district 1 & 2

L. 10:00 open bid 07-09 Nash Fire Department Brush Rig

M. 10:30 open bid 07-09 Manchester Fire Department Brush Rig

N. Fair Board Election Resolution

A Lamont man has been charged in Grant County district court December 27 on felony and misdemeanor complains, after attempting to elude officers in a high-speed chase of speeds reaching 100 mph.

Cody Alan Steinmiller, 19, was charged with one felony count of eluding a police officer, and two misdemeanors counts of driving with license revoked and driving while under the influence of alcohol

According to court records, Oklahoma Highway Patrol trooper Robert Cottrill while on routine patrol approximately 3 miles east of Lamont observed a vehicle traveling east on US 60 driving 78 in a 65 mph zone. When Cottrill attended to stop Steinmiller, Steinmiller accelerated and turned north four miles east of Lamont on a dirt county road. Driving 5 north and then turning east again on a county road which was extremely rutted and dangerous. Cottrill reported in his affidavit of speeds reaching 100 mph on dangerous dirt rooks.

According to the affidavit, the pursuit ended in Kay County when Trooper Fredrickson of Troop K put stop sticks out a 108th and Oklahoma 11.

The affidavit stated there were 3 Kay County troopers, 3 Grant County Sheriff’s officers, 2 Medford PD officers and 2 Kay County deputes that responded to help and all were endangered responding to the pursuit. The affidavit went on the state, the pursuit traveled approximately 20 miles and only two were on pavement. The pursuit lasted approximately 17 minutes. An inventory revealed 10 unopened Coors light cans in the pickup.

According to the affidavit, Steinmiller allegedly told officers the reason he ran was that he did not want to go to jail.

This crime of eluding officers is punishable by imprisonment for up to 5 years or a fine of $5,000

Time for

With another year of great hunting and fishing coming to a close, Oklahoma sportsmen are reminded to renew their annual hunting and fishing licenses.

Anglers heading to one of Oklahoma ’s designated trout streams around the state should remember to purchase a new trout license, fishing and hunting legacy permit and annual fishing license for the new year (all expire Dec. 31).

Bowhunters who plan to hunt through the end of deer archery season (Jan.1-15, antlerless only) should also renew licenses and permits. Unless archers possess a resident lifetime hunting or resident lifetime combination license, they will need a 2008 annual hunting license, 2008 fishing and hunting legacy permit and a 2008 deer archery license to hunt from Jan. 1 through Jan. 15. Bowhunters who purchase a new 2008 deer archery license but do not harvest a deer in January should hold on to their license, which remains valid throughout the fall of 2008 (Oct. 1-Dec. 31).

Hunters and anglers also need a new fishing and hunting legacy permit to hunt or fish beginning Jan. 1 unless exempt.

Three licenses that do not expire at the end of the year are harvest information program (HIP) permits and state and federal waterfowl licenses (which run from July 1 through the end of the following June). In addition, trapping licenses expire Jan. 31. A 2008-2009 trapping license must be purchased to trap beaver, bobcat, nutria, striped skunk and coyote after Jan. 31. The fur license expires Jan. 31 for raccoon, gray/red fox and river otter and Feb. 28 for bobcat.

All annual licenses can be purchased at any license vendor statewide or online at wildlifedepartment.com. Complete license requirements and exemptions are outlined in the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide” and “Oklahoma Fishing Guide.” These publications are available at hunting and fishing license dealers statewide or by logging on to the Department’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com. Information is also available from the Department's licensing section at (405) 521-3852.

Services pending at Hills/Ely
Every day Frank Ender drinks coffee and plays Keno at a convenience store in Caldwell.

According to the Renfrow,Oklahoma resident, he hasn’t had much luck lately. That is until urchased an 8-Spot Keno ticket for 10 consecutive draws, winning a $10,000 top prize plus another $3,298 on the progressive jackpot, bringing his total winnings to $13,298.

“I about fell over,” said Ender. “What’s really something is, I usually only play five consecutive Keno games, but Tuesday I won $31 playing Kansas Hold‘Em and thought I’d splurge on 10 games.”

Ender’s wife, Patricia, dropped him off at the convenience store earlier in the morning while she delivered Meals on Wheels. When she returned, she couldn’t believe he’d won such a large prize.

“When I told my wife what I’d won, I don’t think she believed me at first,” said Ender. “She asked to see my ticket and looked at the store clerk to verify my story. The store clerk offered to print out the winning numbers for her to see.”

After the store clerk showed her the winning numbers, the couple decided to drive to Topeka to claim their prize.

The Enders, who have been married 41 years, have three grown children and three grandchildren. Frank Ender is a retired truck driver. They plan to use their winnings to pay off medical bills.

The winning ticket was purchased at Felts One Stop 6, located at 106 E . Central Ave. in Caldwell.

A 49 year-old Yukon man was found lying in a snow bank northeast of Wakita by a passer-by Christmas Eve shortly before noon.

Information from Grant County officials stated apparently the man was driving in the area and had been stranded after driving into a snow drift and had spent the night inside his pickup.

He then apparently started walking for help. The man had walked about 3-1/2 miles before he was found.

The Medford Ambulance was met by Eagle-Med on the Wakita football field where he was transported to a Wichita hospital. The man when found was incoherent, suffering from hyperthermia, and frost bite.

According to Grant County Sheriff Roland Hula there are no signs of any foul play, but the incident is still under investigation.

The man is reported in good condition.

Yesterday, during the hustle and bustle of holiday shopping, some wonderful "Angels" spent their day giving some dogs and cats the best present of all: a second chance at a "Forever Home."

Pets For Life Rescue is a rescue organization in Ponca City. It is run by wonderful people, who are fierce advocates for the health, safety, and care of all kinds of animals.

They care for, foster, and adopt out cats and dogs of all ages, breeds, and abilities.

All of the animals that come into their organization get health care, vaccinations, spayed/neutered when possible, training, and most importantly, love!

The organization runs STRICTLY on donations from people and businesses, and most importantly, they are a NO KILL Shelter. They are so incredibly devoted to their animals that one of the founders recently took a kitten to Texas, in an ice storm! Just so that cat would have the second chance with a loving family. All members are volunteers, and are uncompensated.

So the next time you see these 'Angels' with their charges, stop and look at the work that they are doing. Help them out if you can. And if you see a dog or cat who tugs at your heart? Give them "A Forever Home."

You can see all of the wonderful cats and dogs of Pets for Life Rescue at: http://www.geocities.com/petsforliferescue/.

And remember ... spay or neuter your pets!

Medford senior citizens were entertained by a very special group this year during their Wheatheart Nutrition Christmas Dinner Thursday Dec.20.

The Medford 5 and 6 grade music class lead by Miss Payne sang a melody of Christmas carols.

The highlight of the program was hearing Bill Fowler sing a solo of, “Up on the Roof Top” Miss Payne made an announcement that Bill Fowler and Bill Loch might do a duet of “Up on the Roof Top next year at the schools Christmas program.

Pictured----- Galen Mardis wearing his new Christmas jacket and hat which were purchased just for the Wheatheart Christmas dinner.

Medford emergency personal responded to the Medford airport Thursday night when a small aircraft missed the runway landing to the west of the air strip and coming to rest upside down in the field.

According to Dan Donnelly, with the N.T.S.B. (National Transportation Safety Board) a contributing factor to the accident is the runway lights not working. But according to Donnelly Friday morning it maybe a couple more weeks till his investigation is finished.

The Cessna 210 was being flown by Don Kirby No one from the accident was transported for injuries.

KC Electric was called to the Medford airport early Friday morning. According to Steve Finch an electrician with KC Electric, the receiver controller was not working and for the time being the photo cell will be sat so the runway lights will come on at dark automatically. This action will be in place till a new receiver controller can be replaced.

The Medford airport had been closed since Oct 17 for runway repair and had just recently reopened.

Dangerous weather conditions have caused the Department of Public Safety to close major roadways throughout northwest Oklahoma.

U.S. 412 is shut down between Mooreland and Bouse Junction and U.S. 64 is shut down between Buffalo and Alva due to quite a few collisions, road blockages and white out, according to DPS.

Garfield, Kingfisher and Blaine counties are receiving moderate snowfall and sleet. Woods, Alfalfa, Major and Grant county roads are slick and hazardous. Woodward and Harper counties are experiencing blizzard-like conditions, and all other counties, including Cimarron, Texas, Beaver and Ellis, are slick in spots.

“Travel is discouraged at this time,” according to the DPS Web site.

It's not quite Christmas but Medford is having near white-out conditions. Two accidents have already occurred in Grant county one near Nash and the other near Renfrow. No injuries reported from the two.
Snow and Blowing Snow Advisory in effect from 6 am to 6 PM CST

Saturday...

The National Weather Service in Norman has issued a Snow and

Blowing Snow Advisory... which is in effect from 6 am to 6 PM CST

Saturday.

A strong cold front is expected to move across the area overnight

tonight. Strong north winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts over 40

mph are expected behind the front. In addition to the strong

winds... light to occasionally moderate snow will likely develop

late tonight and continue through much of the day on Saturday. The

combination of strong winds and blowing snow will result in

visibilities dropping below a quarter of a mile at times. Snow

accumulations of 1 to 3 inches will be possible before the snow

ends late Saturday afternoon... although blowing and drifting of

the snow will make accurate measurements difficult.

A Snow and Blowing Snow Advisory means that visibilities will be

limited due to a combination of falling and blowing snow. Use

caution when traveling... especially in open areas.

The Medford airport is now open and back in operation although the completion of the $255,000 crack, seal and overlay project is not finished.

The crack and seal potion of the project is completed

“We are going to need warmer temperatures this spring to be able to apply the top layer of the asphalt” said Dea Kretchmar, Medford city manager.

The airport has been closed since October 17th when the project began.

More projects is planned for 2009 as the Capital Improvement Plan is reviewed by the Medford Aviation Board.

Use the “L” sign

I know “Road Rage” is wrong and in some incidences can be deadly. Therefore, I do my best to keep mine under control.

A 4-way stop is my own personal distress and I have to keep this in mind every time I approach one.

One day this summer I had made an “Oklahoma stop’ at our four-way stop sign at Oklahoma 11 and SH 81, when a local man on a bicycle went flying by not even attemping to slow his BICYCLE speed or an hesitation at HIS stop sign “This very pleasant man (which I will not name) yelled at me as he flew by “GREAT STOP YOU JUST MADE.” I wanted to yell back, “WELL, IT WAS BETTER THAN YOURS!! To the man; even people on bicycles are required by law to obey stop signs. And by the way, I may not have gone down for the 10 second count, but my wheels did stop turning, just thought I would through that in for clarification.

Who really has the right-of-way at a four-way-stop without a green light to tell you when it’s time to go?

The Oklahoma Driver’s Manual gives explicit instructions about the order in which people are to proceed after stopping – not hesitating – through an intersection. An official “stop” means the wheels completely quit turning for a few seconds before putting the car in forward motion again.

At four-way-stop intersections, just as at intersections without stop signs or signals, the car or truck that entered the intersection first has the right-of-way.

When two vehicles approach at the same time, the driver on the left yields to the driver on the right.

For those who have trouble determining which driver might have the right-of-way, while stopped, hold up your thumb and forefinger. The hand making an “L” means that is the left. If the other car is on the side of the opposite hand, you yield.

If after waiting a longer than normal amount of time for the other driver to continue through the intersection, accelerate cautiously.

The other driver may be deferring to your vehicle out of courtesy, or (as has been known to happen) the driver may be sitting there waiting for that red light to turn green.

In that case, your waiting will last an exceedingly long time.

The Wheatland RC&D organization has teamed with Dell Computers for a " "gifts in kindprogram, and in turn the Medford Public School system received six copy/scanner/printers, at no charge to the school.

Mickey Geurkink, Medford superintendent, was thrilled with the donation, and he indicated that the copy/scanner/printers would be a huge help. He said that individual departments, such as the art department or ag department, could have the copy/scanner/printers, and not have to make the long walk to the library each time they need to use the central scanner.

Grant County Commissioner #2 Commissioner Cindy Bobbitt is a member of the Wheatland RC&D board, and Carl Smith, out of the Enid office, is the RC&D Coordinator.

They presented the copy/scanner/printers to the school on Monday. It is probable that other area schools will receive donations of similar equipment in the future, Bobbitt said.

Dell helps Gifts in Kind assist non-profits and Title 1 schools, with the goal of improving education and job training and increasing access to technology, helping the physically disabled and financially disadvantaged and other vital community services. Organizations with 501(c) (3) status, Indian reservations and Title 1 schools are qualified to receive these contributions.

Wheatland RD&D is one of nine groups in the RC&D program. The counties included in the Wheatland group are Alfalfa, Blaine, Canadian, Garfield, Grant, Kay, Kingfisher, Logan, Major and Noble. The Resource Conservation and Development organization is a division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The purpose of the RC&D organization is conservation, development and utilization of natural resources to improve the general level of economic activity and to enhance the environment and standard of living in RC&D areas.

Grant County District 2 truck driver Ron Cambron and grader operator Steve Wilson recently became certified in the County Roads Scholar Program offered through the Local Technical Assistance Program (LTAP) at Oklahoma State University. Cambron and Wilson received a Certificate of Completion at the Association of County Commissioners (ACCO) meeting last month in Oklahoma City.

Commissioner Cindy Bobbitt said, “District 2 now has 10 employees that have successfully completed this program with six more working towards their certification.”

The Roads Scholar program is designed to enhance the skills of commissioners, road and bridge foremen, and road crew personnel as well as to improve their knowledge in basic civil engineering and other technical aspects of road construction and maintenance. To be certified as Roads Scholar, Cambron and Wilson completed 9 classes totaling 120 hours of instruction and laboratory experience.

Grant County administration and employees routinely attend training programs, state-legislated accreditation programs, workshops, seminars, technical conferences and professional development retreats.

“Through all types of continuing education, Grant County can operate more efficiently and provide all segments of the population with the services they need and desire,” Bobbitt said. “The county also receives a return on our investment by retaining safety educated individuals, which translates into fewer injuries and/or equipment damage.”

For more information about the Roads Scholar program visit http://ltap.okstate.edu. You may also visit http://www.grantdistrict2.com to learn more about other continuing education courses in which Grant County participates.

Northwest

Canton: Lake level is 0.33 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair to poor. High water levels through out the spring limited native forage growth in shallow portions of the lake. Winter wheat is in good condition. Row crops in the area have been harvested and are in good to excellent condition. Duck numbers are moderate. Goose numbers are moderate to high. Hunting activity is low, with moderate success. Bird movement into the area has increased the last couple of weeks during the last snow and ice event. The boat ramp west of the Wildlife Management Area headquarters is usable as is all boat ramps on the south side of the lake.

Ft. Supply : Lake level is 0.06 ft below normal. Habitat conditions around the lake are fair. Local wheat crops in the area range from fair to poor in condition. Duck numbers are good. Goose numbers are good. Hunting activity is low, with no reports of success. Bird movement in the area has been good recently. Lake is 80% frozen, but will be thawing with warmer temperatures.

Washita National Wildlife Refuge: Lake level is 0.27 ft. below normal. Wheat is up in refuge farm fields. Duck numbers: wigeon 363; mallard 109; gadwall 227; ring-necked 174; bufflehead 63; shoveller 75; canvasback 40; redhead 36; pintail 26. Goose numbers: Canada 29,094; snow 346. Due to thick fog goose numbers are severely undercounted.

Southwest

Ft. Cobb: Lake level is 1.25 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair due to high water level. Winter wheat is good in the area. Duck numbers are fair, with mostly mallards. Goose numbers are good. Hunting activity is high on the weekends. Hunters appear to having good success.

Hackberry: Refuge reservoir is approximately 4 foot below conservation pool, with around 450 acres of wetland units flooded. Habitat conditions are fair. Duck numbers are good. Goose numbers are good. Hunter activity is moderate. Hunter success is low. Duck numbers are increasing. Goose numbers are steadily increasing. Hackberry Flat Waterfowl Refuge Portion is closed to all activity from October 15 to January 31.

Mtn. Park : Lake level is 0.60 ft. below normal. Flooded salt cedar around the lake is providing some cover. Winter wheat is good on the Wildlife Management Area. Flooded milo and wheat on the Wetland Development Units with 80% flooded. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are good, with large flocks of Canada , whitefront, and snows. Hunting activity is low, with good success. A large number of birds are using the Wetland Development Unit on the lake.

Waurika: Lake level is 0.35 ft. above normal. Lake habitat condition is poor to fair. Winter wheat in the area is in fair. Wetland Development Unit south of highway 53 is flooded, along with Walker Creek Wetland Development Unit. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low.

Northeast

Copan: Lake level is 0.36 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. Flooded native plants in the area are in fair condition, with corn fields on the Wildlife Management Area in good condition. Plenty of flooded vegetation present to hold birds. Duck numbers are fair, with a lot of mallards using the moist soil units. Goose numbers are low. Most birds have been on the main body of the lake due to freezing shallow waters. Hunting activity is light during the week and heavy on the weekends. Hunter success is good, with mostly mallards and teal.

Eufaula: Lake level is 1.15 ft. below normal. Current habitat condition is very poor due to high summer lake levels that prevented planting of Japanese millet. Very little farming in the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low to moderate. Hunting success has been marginal. Bird movement in the area is low.

Ft. Gibson: Lake level is 4.59 ft. below normal. Habitat condition is good. Due to the extreme high water throughout summer and early fall the vegetation is in poor shape. There are some agricultural crops in the area. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is moderate, with fair success. Bird movement in the area has increased.

Hulah: Lake level is 0.51 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. Wheat and soybean fields on the Wildlife Management Area are in good condition. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is light on weekdays, and heavy on weekends. Hunting success has been fair. Bird movement has been on the main body of the lack to due to freezing weather.

Kaw: Lake level is 0.38 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is poor. No millet available in the area, but good native food available. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are low. Hunter activity is slow, with fair success. Bird movement has increased as recent cold fronts arrived. The upper portion of the lake is currently frozen, but should be clear in a few days.

Keystone: Lake level is 1.5 ft. above normal. Habitat conditions are poor, with almost no food available due to prolonged summer flooding on the lake. Both duck and goose numbers are low. Little migration has been seen in the past few days on the area. Hunters utilizing the area this year should be prepared for very deep mud. Caution should be taken, especially if hunting alone.

Oologah: Lake level is 2.15 ft. above normal. Current habitat conditions are poor to fair. No flooded millet or native vegetation on the lake. Ag fields have been re-planted due to flood conditions this summer, and are currently in poor condition. Duck numbers are poor to fair, with some gadwalls, common goldeneyes, ring-necks and mallards present. Goose numbers are fair, with some Giant Canadians and snows seen in the area. Bird movement continues to increase with colder weather. There is significant ice storm damage to the Wildlife Management Area and to the Wetland Development Units. Most if not all roads are un-accessible within the Wildlife Management Area. Hunter’s should contact the Army Corp of Engineer’s Office at Oologah to see if boat ramps are clear or open to access the lake. Upper Verdigris Wetland Development Unit has a few Gadwalls and both units are 90% capacity. Contact the area biologist for information.

Sooner: Lake level is near average. Current habitat conditions are poor. Winter wheat in the area is in poor to fair condition. Duck numbers in the area are low. Goose numbers are fair. Hunter activity is low, with low success. No waterfowl movement in the area has been observed recently.

Webbers Falls: Lake level is 3.48 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is good, with smartweed, barnyardgrass, bidens, cut soybeans, corn, milo and wheat in the area. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are low. Hunter activity is moderate, with fair success. Bird movement in the area has increased.

Southeast

Grassy Slough: Wetlands approximately 65% full. Habitat condition is good. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunter activity is low, with fair success. No bird movement noted in the area.

Hugo: Lake level is 0.09 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. Very good acorn crop in the area for when water gets up in the river. Duck numbers are good. Goose numbers are very low, with a few Canada and snows. Hunting activity is very light on weekdays and light on weekends. Hunting success is good. Best hunting is in the shallows and creeks as they flow into the river.

Little River National Wildlife Refuge: Lake level is good, with good food conditions. Duck numbers: wood duck 650; gadwall 385; mallard 140; wigeon 10. No geese observed.

Red Slough: Wetland units are averaging 70% full. Habitat conditions are excellent with plenty of wild forage. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is moderate on weekends, and light on weekdays. Hunter success is good. Some bird movement occurred over the weekend.

Texoma: Lake level is 2.15 ft. below normal. Due to high water levels which persisted through out the growing season no millet or very little native food is available. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunter activity is low, with low success. Fair weather has scattered what birds were on the area.

Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge: Lake level is above normal. Food condtions are good. Duck numbers: mallard 212; bufflehead 42; green-winged teal 21. Goose numbers: snow 6500; white-fronted 1625; Canada 15.

Wister: Lake level is 6 ft. below normal. Habitat conditions are fair. Smartweed, sedges and acorns are present on the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Some birds are moving through the area, but none are staying. Hunting activity is moderate, with low success. All development units on are currently at 100% for second half.

Northwest

Canton: Lake level is 0.33 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair to poor. High water levels through out the spring limited native forage growth in shallow portions of the lake. Winter wheat is in good condition. Row crops in the area have been harvested and are in good to excellent condition. Duck numbers are moderate. Goose numbers are moderate to high. Hunting activity is low, with moderate success. Bird movement into the area has increased the last couple of weeks during the last snow and ice event. The boat ramp west of the Wildlife Management Area headquarters is usable as is all boat ramps on the south side of the lake.

Ft. Supply : Lake level is 0.06 ft below normal. Habitat conditions around the lake are fair. Local wheat crops in the area range from fair to poor in condition. Duck numbers are good. Goose numbers are good. Hunting activity is low, with no reports of success. Bird movement in the area has been good recently. Lake is 80% frozen, but will be thawing with warmer temperatures.

Washita National Wildlife Refuge: Lake level is 0.27 ft. below normal. Wheat is up in refuge farm fields. Duck numbers: wigeon 363; mallard 109; gadwall 227; ring-necked 174; bufflehead 63; shoveller 75; canvasback 40; redhead 36; pintail 26. Goose numbers: Canada 29,094; snow 346. Due to thick fog goose numbers are severely undercounted.

Southwest

Ft. Cobb: Lake level is 1.25 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair due to high water level. Winter wheat is good in the area. Duck numbers are fair, with mostly mallards. Goose numbers are good. Hunting activity is high on the weekends. Hunters appear to having good success.

Hackberry: Refuge reservoir is approximately 4 foot below conservation pool, with around 450 acres of wetland units flooded. Habitat conditions are fair. Duck numbers are good. Goose numbers are good. Hunter activity is moderate. Hunter success is low. Duck numbers are increasing. Goose numbers are steadily increasing. Hackberry Flat Waterfowl Refuge Portion is closed to all activity from October 15 to January 31.

Mtn. Park : Lake level is 0.60 ft. below normal. Flooded salt cedar around the lake is providing some cover. Winter wheat is good on the Wildlife Management Area. Flooded milo and wheat on the Wetland Development Units with 80% flooded. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are good, with large flocks of Canada , whitefront, and snows. Hunting activity is low, with good success. A large number of birds are using the Wetland Development Unit on the lake.

Waurika: Lake level is 0.35 ft. above normal. Lake habitat condition is poor to fair. Winter wheat in the area is in fair. Wetland Development Unit south of highway 53 is flooded, along with Walker Creek Wetland Development Unit. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low.

Northeast

Copan: Lake level is 0.36 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. Flooded native plants in the area are in fair condition, with corn fields on the Wildlife Management Area in good condition. Plenty of flooded vegetation present to hold birds. Duck numbers are fair, with a lot of mallards using the moist soil units. Goose numbers are low. Most birds have been on the main body of the lake due to freezing shallow waters. Hunting activity is light during the week and heavy on the weekends. Hunter success is good, with mostly mallards and teal.

Eufaula: Lake level is 1.15 ft. below normal. Current habitat condition is very poor due to high summer lake levels that prevented planting of Japanese millet. Very little farming in the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low to moderate. Hunting success has been marginal. Bird movement in the area is low.

Ft. Gibson: Lake level is 4.59 ft. below normal. Habitat condition is good. Due to the extreme high water throughout summer and early fall the vegetation is in poor shape. There are some agricultural crops in the area. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is moderate, with fair success. Bird movement in the area has increased.

Hulah: Lake level is 0.51 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. Wheat and soybean fields on the Wildlife Management Area are in good condition. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is light on weekdays, and heavy on weekends. Hunting success has been fair. Bird movement has been on the main body of the lack to due to freezing weather.

Kaw: Lake level is 0.38 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is poor. No millet available in the area, but good native food available. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are low. Hunter activity is slow, with fair success. Bird movement has increased as recent cold fronts arrived. The upper portion of the lake is currently frozen, but should be clear in a few days.

Keystone: Lake level is 1.5 ft. above normal. Habitat conditions are poor, with almost no food available due to prolonged summer flooding on the lake. Both duck and goose numbers are low. Little migration has been seen in the past few days on the area. Hunters utilizing the area this year should be prepared for very deep mud. Caution should be taken, especially if hunting alone.

Oologah: Lake level is 2.15 ft. above normal. Current habitat conditions are poor to fair. No flooded millet or native vegetation on the lake. Ag fields have been re-planted due to flood conditions this summer, and are currently in poor condition. Duck numbers are poor to fair, with some gadwalls, common goldeneyes, ring-necks and mallards present. Goose numbers are fair, with some Giant Canadians and snows seen in the area. Bird movement continues to increase with colder weather. There is significant ice storm damage to the Wildlife Management Area and to the Wetland Development Units. Most if not all roads are un-accessible within the Wildlife Management Area. Hunter’s should contact the Army Corp of Engineer’s Office at Oologah to see if boat ramps are clear or open to access the lake. Upper Verdigris Wetland Development Unit has a few Gadwalls and both units are 90% capacity. Contact the area biologist for information.

Sooner: Lake level is near average. Current habitat conditions are poor. Winter wheat in the area is in poor to fair condition. Duck numbers in the area are low. Goose numbers are fair. Hunter activity is low, with low success. No waterfowl movement in the area has been observed recently.

Webbers Falls: Lake level is 3.48 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is good, with smartweed, barnyardgrass, bidens, cut soybeans, corn, milo and wheat in the area. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are low. Hunter activity is moderate, with fair success. Bird movement in the area has increased.

Southeast

Grassy Slough: Wetlands approximately 65% full. Habitat condition is good. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunter activity is low, with fair success. No bird movement noted in the area.

Hugo: Lake level is 0.09 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. Very good acorn crop in the area for when water gets up in the river. Duck numbers are good. Goose numbers are very low, with a few Canada and snows. Hunting activity is very light on weekdays and light on weekends. Hunting success is good. Best hunting is in the shallows and creeks as they flow into the river.

Little River National Wildlife Refuge: Lake level is good, with good food conditions. Duck numbers: wood duck 650; gadwall 385; mallard 140; wigeon 10. No geese observed.

Red Slough: Wetland units are averaging 70% full. Habitat conditions are excellent with plenty of wild forage. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is moderate on weekends, and light on weekdays. Hunter success is good. Some bird movement occurred over the weekend.

Texoma: Lake level is 2.15 ft. below normal. Due to high water levels which persisted through out the growing season no millet or very little native food is available. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunter activity is low, with low success. Fair weather has scattered what birds were on the area.

Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge: Lake level is above normal. Food condtions are good. Duck numbers: mallard 212; bufflehead 42; green-winged teal 21. Goose numbers: snow 6500; white-fronted 1625; Canada 15.

Wister: Lake level is 6 ft. below normal. Habitat conditions are fair. Smartweed, sedges and acorns are present on the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Some birds are moving through the area, but none are staying. Hunting activity is moderate, with low success. All development units on are currently at 100% for second half.

Weather Barrier Roofing, a roofing contractor, began repairing the roof on the city’s downtown building last week. Only the south third of the building is being repaired.

“We have already repaired the other part of the roof.” said City manager Dea Kretchmar. “The cost of the repair is

$6,100. “We have turned the damaged into our insurance company.” stated Kretchmar.

The roof is being repaired because daylight could be seen through different area’s of the ceiling

The Hawley Fire Department responded to a oil field fire Tuesday evening Dec. 18th, after receiving a call from Grant County Sheriff’s department at 6:10 PM of a tank battery fire 2 east & 1 south of Hawley.

According to the report, a pumped was lighting a heater treater when the excess oil around the equipment caught fire. Assisting Hawley was Nash & Wakita Fire Departments. The tank batteries are operated by Atlas Pipeline.

All units were back in the station at 6:57 PM.

Bethel Hawley Baptist Church will begin their 4th class of Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University on Jan. 6, 2008. The class will meet every Sunday night from 6 – 7:30 PM at the Hawley Volunteer Fire Department Classroom. Annette Lillie, CLU, LUTCF, CSA will be the class coordinator for this 13 week class.

The average family pays off $5,300 in debt and saves $2,700 in the first 91 days after beginning FPU and is completely out of debt, except for the mortgage, in 18 to 24 months.

FPU are made up of 13 life-changing lessons taught by Ramsey in a fun and entertaining way. “I like to put the cookies on the shelf where everyone can reach them,” says Ramsey. Topics covered include:

• How and why to save money – Now!

• Creating a realistic, effective household budget

• The impact of money on your relationships

• Finding incredible bargains

• Dumping your debt FOREVER

• Understanding investments

• The role of insurance in your financial plan

• Planning for retirement and college

• The power of consumer marketing

• Buying and selling homes effectively

• Finding a career perfectly suited to you

• Collections practices and credit bureaus

• The power of giving in your life

Beginning in 1994, Dave Ramsey taught FPU classes in Nashville until the classes became available on video in 1997. Today, thousands of classes are held in churches, corporations, and community organizations and on military bases around the country. To enroll in the class or to obtain additional information, please call the church at 839-2480. Bethel Hawley Baptist Church is located 7 miles north of Nash on Hwy. 132 and then one mile east.

BLACKWELL — One person was killed and another seriously injured in a van-truck crash on Interstate 35 in Kay County.

Juan Michelena-Trinidad, 24, or Woodburn, Ore., died at the scene of the 2:10 p.m. Tuesday accident a half-mile west of Blackwell, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol said.

Troopers said he was a passenger in a van driven by Ruben Morales-Carillo, 25, of Woodburn, Ore.

The van was northbound when it ran off the west side of the roadway, came back across and went into a slide. It crossed the median and was struck by a tractor-trailer driven by Gerald A. Pierce, 61, of Fon du Lac, Wis.

The van rolled onto its side. Morales-Carillo was taken to the Blackwell hospital, then airlifted to Wesley Medical Center in Wichita, Kan., where he was listed in critical condition.

Pierce refused treatment at the scene for head and arm injuries as did passenger Jack J. Woods, 51, of Milwaukee, Wis.

The patrol said all four wore seat belts. Unsafe speed was cited as the cause of the accident.

District Attorney Cathy Stocker announced the appointment of Steven Young to the position of Assistant District Attorney in Grant County to fill the vacancy created when former Assistant District Attorney Melissa Blanton resigned to accept a position at the District Attorneys Council in Oklahoma City.

Stocker said Young has been in private practice in the Oklahoma City area for the last 8 years. Young who is also a CPA, primarily focused his practice on estate and tax planning, she said.

“I’m pleased Steven has accepted the position. I believe his professionalism, knowledge, and expertise will serve the citizens of Grant County well,” Stocker said. Young said he was looking forward to working in the District Attorneys Office and becoming a member of the Medford community

These values represent statistics for the day in progress.

They do NOT represent final daily values.

Statistical data for Medford: December 16, 2007 ( since midnight CST)

Class Parameter Value Time (CST)

Air Temperature Maximum Temperature 19 F 9:05 am

Minimum Temperature 11 F 6:45 am

Average Temperature 13 F

Dewpoint Temperature Maximum Dewpoint Temperature 15 F 9:05 am

Minimum Dewpoint Temperature 8 F 6:45 am

Average Dewpoint Temperature 11 F

Relative Humidity Maximum Relative Humidity 93 % 2:10 am

Minimum Relative Humidity 84 % 9:05 am

Average Relative Humidity 90 %

10 cm Soil Temperature (sod) Maximum TS10 Soil Temperature 36 F 12:15 am

Minimum TS10 Soil Temperature 35 F 9:00 am

Average TS10 Soil Temperature 36 F

10 cm Soil Temperature (bare) Maximum TB10 Soil Temperature 35 F 12:15 am

Minimum TB10 Soil Temperature 35 F 9:00 am

Average TB10 Soil Temperature 35 F

Barometric Pressure Maximum Barometric Pressure 29.09 in 8:40 am

Minimum Barometric Pressure 29.04 in 1:35 am

Average Barometric Pressure 29.06 in

Wind Speed Maximum Wind Speed 11 mph 12:50 am

Average Wind Speed 6 mph

Wind Direction Prevailing Wind Direction W (51%)

Secondary Wind Direction WNW (36%)

Rainfall Rainfall 0.00 in

Solar Radiation Maximum Solar Radiation 228 W/m2 9:05 am

Total Solar Radiation 0.6 MJ/m2

Governors bet on Big 12 title game

Gov. Brad Henry and Missouri Gov. Matt Blunt have made a friendly wager on Saturday’s Big 12 Conference football championship, which pits the top-ranked University of Missouri Tigers against the ninth-ranked University of Oklahoma Sooners.

Each governor is wagering 12 products from their respective states on the outcome of the Saturday contest in San Antonio, Texas.

“Missouri is an excellent team, but so, too, are the Sooners — and we have a wealth of experience on the championship stage,” Henry said. “I am confident that Bob Stoops and the Sooners will triumph in San Antonio. I look forward to sampling some of the finest goods that Missouri has to offer, courtesy of Gov. Blunt.”

The Missouri products on the table range from pecan halves and walnuts to soup and root beer.

“The Missouri Tigers are on a roll,” Blunt said. “I cannot wait to watch them roll over the University of Oklahoma Sooners after maligning the Kansas Jayhawks Saturday night. The Tigers are ready for this historic game with the Sooners and we are ready to chalk up another victory.”

Wildlife Department schedules public hearings

The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation will be holding public hearings across the state Jan. 7-10, 2008 to collect input on proposed hunting and fishing regulation changes.

Sportsmen are encouraged to attend and voice their opinions on proposals, which range from certain deer hunting regulation changes to changes in size and daily limits on some fish.

Several of the proposals involve adjustments to deer seasons and deer bag limits both statewide and in designated areas. One proposal would allow deer archery hunters to harvest a deer of either sex during the period from Jan. 1-15. Currently, only antlerless deer may be taken during that time period. Also involving deer archery season is a proposal to increase the number of deer that can be harvested by archers from four deer to six deer. Another proposal would open deer gun season to the same as statewide season dates on Broken Bow, Honobia Creek, Three Rivers and Ouachita wildlife management areas.

Other hunting-related proposals include the following:

* Changing the deer gun season limits and muzzleloader season limits on Keystone and Skiatook WMAs so that the limit on each season would be one antlered and one antlerless deer.

* Changing the muzzleloader season at Lexington WMA to allow for the harvest of antlerless deer the second Saturday and Sunday of the season. Currently, deer muzzleloader season on Lexington WMA is limited to antlered deer only.

* Allowing those persons certified to use a crossbow to use a device that permits a bow to be held mechanically at full or partial draw for archery hunting.

* Clarifying that persons with disabilities and youth hunters are eligible to draw more than one controlled hunt per year and clarifying permit requirements (nonambulatory or motor vehicle permits) for those applying for the Deer Hunts for Persons with Disabilities category of the Controlled Hunts program.

A slate of other wildlife and hunting-related items will be open for discussion during the public hearings across the state, including allowing the use of poison to control prairie dogs on public land, establishing rules regarding the nuisance control programs for beaver and coyote and the Feral Hog Depredation Program and others. To view the complete agenda for the public hearings, log on to wildlifedepartment.com.

Among the fishing-related proposals is one to exempt spotted bass from length limits and to remove the bag limit on spotted bass statewide, except in certain streams. Another proposal would limit the harvest of alligator gar to one fish per angler per day statewide, except from April 1 - June 15, when fishing for alligator gar would be catch and release only.

Other fishing-related items are on the public hearing agenda as well, such as tightening restrictions on dealing with invasive aquatic species, adjusting definitions related to limbline angling and making permanent a currently established emergency rule requiring paddlefish anglers to carry a free paddlefish permit.

Those unable to attend the hearings are encouraged to send their comments by mail to: Attn: Proposed hunting and fishing regulation changes – Wildlife Department, P.O. Box 53465, Oklahoma City, OK 73152. All comments are weighted equally whether received in writing or delivered at the public hearings. Comments will be accepted at this address until 4:30 p.m. on Jan. 25.

Date: Jan. 8, 2008

Time: 7 p.m.

Enid – Central Fire Station, 410 W. Garriot

FISHING REPORT FOR DECEMBER 12, 2007

CENTRAL

Thunderbird: Elevation normal, water clear. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 8-10 ft. on structure. Saugeye are reportedly hitting some after dark on minnows off points. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

NORTHEAST

Eucha: Elevation normal and rising, water 49 and dingy. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around brush and structure at 16-18 feet. Largemouth fair on spinner baits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Crappie fair at fishing dock and brush structure on minnows and jigs; black bass fair on plastic worms and jig-n-worms; catfish fair on stinkbait and cut shad on the bottom. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Spavinaw: Elevation normal and rising, water 50 and clear. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around the dam area. Largemouth fair on spinnerbaits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Webbers Falls. Elevation normal, water murky. Crappie good at brush structure and bridges on minnows and jigs; catfish fair on stinkbait and cut shad on the bottom; black bass slow along riprap along creek channels on plastic worms and jig-n-worms. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs near brush piles. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation 1 1/2 ft below normal, water 54 degrees and stained. White bass good at 28-35 ft at mouths of coves. Crappie good on 1/4 oz. strataspoons at brush piles and mid-lake drop-offs. Bass fishing fair to good on dropshot, crankbaits in crawdad pattern, and bass jig. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 46 and clear. Bass slow on minnows and flies. Catfish fair on liver and worms. Trout good on power baits, super dupers, roostertails and mealworms. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on jigs and worms around points and islands. Catfish good on jugs with sunfish. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around structure. Walleye biting on deep-running crankbaits after dark around islands and points. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 2 ft. below normal, water clear. Largemouth bass slow. White bass slow. Blue catfish fair on shad drifting deep flats. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows at 10-20 ft. near boat docks. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Hugo: Elevation normal, water 58. Bass and catfish slow. Crappie fair on minnows along the river channel. Report submitted by Joe Young, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 49 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits at 5-10 ft. in discharge canals. Channel catfish fair on chicken livers at 15 ft. in discharge canals. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

McGee Creek: Elevation one ft. below normal, 58 degrees, and clear. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastic lures off rocky points. Crappie fair on minnows at 16-25 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Pine Creek: Elevation below normal, water clear. Bass are fair on Carolina-rigged lizards in 10-15 ft of water. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel catfish are fair on punch bait and night crawlers around the old bridge. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Sardis Lake: Elevation normal. Largemouth bass slow in coves. White bass and walleye slow. Blue catfish good to fair deep on cut bait near channels. Crappie excellent on minnows around brush piles and bridges. Flathead catfish slow. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Texoma: Elevation is 2 1/3 ft. below normal, water 58 and clear. Striped bass fair on live bait at 10-20 ft. at Platter Flats. Channel and blue catfish fair on live bait at 10-15 ft. deep in the Washita River arm. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 5-10 ft. along Kansas and Rock Creeks. Report submitted by Danny Club, game warden stationed in Bryan County .

Wister: Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits at points and drop-offs. Crappie slow to fair at timber and mouth of creeks. Channel and blue catfish fair on juglines with liver. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 18 ft. at Ralph’s Resort. Catfish fair on cut baits. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Snow is expected to develop across portions of northwest Oklahoma

Friday morning while a mix of rain and snow will be possible over

central and western Oklahoma. The rain in central and western

Oklahoma will change over to all snow Friday evening. Snowfall

amounts in excess of 4 inches will be possible across parts of

west-central and north-central Oklahoma... with 2 to 4 inches

likely over the remainder of the watch area.

This years Busy Moms Christmas Dinner for seniors citizens was as always a huge success. Bill and Nelda Fowler received a spacial recognition during the evening, It was the Fowler's 60th Wedding Anniversary.

Mrs. Goodman's Home Ag Department was a great help this year by volenteering in serveral way to make the Christmas Dinner so enjoyable for Medford seniors.

The dinner has been an anunal event since 1981.

Oga Kretchmar (left) and Wilma Hajek (right) are two Busy Moms club members who took time out to get their picture taken with Santa Claus

regional weather discussion... A large area of rain and embedded thunderstorms will continue to spread east through Oklahoma and western North Texas this morning. Through 8 am... most of the heavier rains will be across central Oklahoma. The rain may be occasionally mixed with freezing rain mainly across parts of northern Oklahoma. Meanwhile... areas of fog will cover parts of south central and southeast Oklahoma... where visibilities will be frequently one half mile or less through mid morning. Temperatures in central Oklahoma... which are near or slightly above freezing... will climb very slowly during the morning. The slowly rising temperatures... along with the rainfall... will likely will cause some of the heavy accumulations of ice from the recent ice storm to melt and fall from trees and powerlines... possibly posing a risk to pedestrians. Temperatures over south central and southeast Oklahoma were in the 50s this morning... while the extensive ice accumulations in central Oklahoma held temperatures near the freezing mark overnight. As the latest bout of rain spreads through the area this morning... temperatures in southern Oklahoma will likley fall back into the 30s and 40s.
Because of the extremely bad weather in Medford the Memory Tree service at Hills-Ely has been canceled for two o'clock today Sunday
Mesonet Statistical Data for Medford, Oklahoma.

These values represent statistics for the day in progress.

They do NOT represent final daily values.

Statistical data for Medford: December 9, 2007 ( since midnight CST)

Class Parameter Value Time (CST)

Air Temperature Maximum Temperature 24 F 12:05 am

Minimum Temperature 22 F 4:30 am

Average Temperature 23 F

Dewpoint Temperature Maximum Dewpoint Temperature 23 F 12:05 am

Minimum Dewpoint Temperature 20 F 5:50 am

Average Dewpoint Temperature 21 F

Relative Humidity Maximum Relative Humidity 96 % 12:05 am

Minimum Relative Humidity 92 % 7:30 am

Average Relative Humidity 94 %

10 cm Soil Temperature (sod) Maximum TS10 Soil Temperature 40 F 12:15 am

Minimum TS10 Soil Temperature 38 F 8:45 am

Average TS10 Soil Temperature 38 F

10 cm Soil Temperature (bare) Maximum TB10 Soil Temperature 38 F 12:15 am

Minimum TB10 Soil Temperature 36 F 8:45 am

Average TB10 Soil Temperature 36 F

Barometric Pressure Maximum Barometric Pressure 29.20 in 8:10 am

Minimum Barometric Pressure 29.07 in 12:45 am

Average Barometric Pressure 29.13 in

Wind Speed Maximum Wind Speed 23 mph 3:20 am

Average Wind Speed 12 mph

Wind Direction Prevailing Wind Direction N (49%)

Secondary Wind Direction NNW (44%)

Rainfall Rainfall 0.00 in

Solar Radiation Maximum Solar Radiation 51 W/m2 8:55 am

Total Solar Radiation 0.1 MJ/m2

According to the OG&E map at 8:45 this morning there are close to five thousand customers without power in the Central and Eastern parts of the state because of freezing rain. Medford so far is holding out fairly well with just sleet.

Ice Storm Warning in effect today for parts of central...

western and northern Oklahoma...

The National Weather Service in Norman has issued an Ice Storm

Warning... which is in effect until 6 PM CST this afternoon. A

Winter Storm Watch remains in effect from 6 PM CST this evening

through late Monday night.

Areas of freezing rain... possibly mixed with sleet at times... is

likely this morning before diminishing to light freezing drizzle

later today. Many roadways... especially bridges and overpasses...

will be slick. The build up of ice could cause tree limbs and

power lines to come down resulting in scattered power outages.

Periods of heavy freezing rain this morning will cause additional

accumulations of one quarter to one half inch of ice this morning.

The freezing precipitation is expected to diminish to scattered

light freezing drizzle by this afternoon.

Late tonight... another round of freezing rain is expected to

redevelop and continue into Monday and Monday night. Additional

significant accumulations of ice will be possible.

The accumulation of this quantity of ice has the potential to

greatly disrupt travel and produce widespread power outages.

An Ice Storm Warning means severe winter weather conditions are

expected. Significant amounts of ice accumulations will make

travel dangerous or impossible. Travel is strongly discouraged.

Ice accumulations and winds will likely lead to snapped power

lines and falling tree branches that add to the danger.

A Winter Storm Watch means there is a potential for additional significant

snow... sleet... or ice accumulations that may impact travel.

Continue to monitor the latest forecasts.

regional weather discussion... at 330 PM...cloudy and cool conditions prevailed over Oklahoma and North Texas...with patches of drizzle continuing off and on over the area. The freezing line extended from Medford...to Fairview...and Cheyenne. Meanwhile...an upper level disturbance over West Texas was approaching the area. Winds several thousand feet above the surface were responding to the disturbance's approach...resulting in increased moisture flow above the surface and lifting of the air. Radar and satellite trends showed cloud development spreading into the forecast area...mainly along and south of Interstate 44...with radar also showing hints of shower development. The latest observational trends and model guidance indicate that scattered showers with embedded thunderstorms will overspread areas along and south of Interstate 44 between 5 PM and 11 PM...as the disturbance moves into the area. Values of higher-based cape near 500 may support a few stronger storms with small hail possible. During this time...the freezing line will be moving southward...reaching Stillwater and Weatherford by 9 PM...and Seminole to Oklahoma City...Purcell...and Hobart by midnight. Freezing rain...with embedded freezing rain showers...may develop as early as 9 PM...near and just south of Stillwater and Guthrie...and possibly into the Oklahoma Metro area after 9 PM. Ice amounts are expected to remain generally light. However...if showers or thunderstorms develop with temperatures below freezing...significant ice accumulations may develop very quickly. North of this area...including Woodward...Enid...Medford and Ponca City...mainly freezing drizzle is expected with very little ice.
Vote for the 4-H Centennial Logo!

While our Oklahoma statehood centennial year is drawing to a close, the Oklahoma 4-H centennial – 2009 - is fast approaching. The 4-H centennial committee has been working to develop a centennial logo and slogan. To vote for your favorite logo and slogan, go to http://agweb.okstate.edu/survey/centennial by January 1, 2008.

Three logos are pictured at the site for voters to choose from. The slogans are: 1. Honoring the Past. Celebrating the Present. Envisioning the Future. 2. Making the Best Better. Honoring the Past. Celebrating the Present. Envisioning the Future. 3. Celebrating 100 Years of Making the Best Better.

For more information about the logo contest or the Oklahoma 4-H program, contact the Grant County OSU Cooperative Extension Office, 112 E. Guthrie Room 301 Courthouse Medford, Oklahoma 73759-1246, 580-395-2134 or robyn.rapp@okstate.edu.

REGULAR MEETING AGENDA

MEDFORD BOARD OF EDUCATION

Monday, December 10, 2007

7:00 P.M.

Teachers Lounge 301 N. Main

Medford, Oklahoma 73759

Posted this 7th day of December, 2007, at 2:35 p.m. at the main office entrance, cafeteria doors and workroom to the Medford School Building and the school website.

Posted by Gloria Gonzales. Deputy Clerk

(NOTE: The Medford Board of Education may discus, vote to approve, vote to disapprove, vote to table or decide not to vote on any item on this agenda)

Call to order and recording of members present and absent to establish a quorum

Consent Agenda:

All of the following items, which concern reports and items of a routine nature normally approved at a board meeting, will be approved by one board vote, unless any board member desires to have a separate vote on any or all of these items. The consent agenda consists of the discussion, consideration, and approval of the following items:

Approve with corrections minutes of November 12, 2007 regular meeting.

Approval of monthly financial reports ending December 7, 2007.

a. Treasurer’s cash balance report

b. Encumbrance and warrant registers in the general and building funds

c. School activity fund monthly summary

d. Approval of a $100.00 donation to the library for the purchase of books

C. Transfer of funds within the activity fund account.

i. $200.00 from Concessions to the Junior class.

Teachers Report

Principal Report

Superintendent Report

Discussion, motion and possible action regarding the annual lease of the outdoor classroom.

Discussion, motion and possible action to approve or disapprove the updated payment schedule for game workers.

Discussion, motion and possible action to approve or disapprove a $125.00 dollar extra duty payment to Luann Przybylski for the Veterans Day Assembly.

Discussion, motion, and possible action to approve or not to approve an additional fund raiser for the FFA Booster Club

Discussion with Jon Vogt about possible technology updates

Discussion about a possible bond issue next spring

New Business – Item(s) that could not have been foreseen or known about at the time agenda was posted

Vote to adjourn

It’s starting to feel a lot like Christmas this week with the forecast of patchy freezing drizzle and slick roads will be possible in far northern Oklahoma...mainly after midnight, early Sunday morning and lasting for most of the week. I went shopping Friday evening and Wal-mart was over flowing with shoppers but their carts were not full of Christmas gifts as one might think. The area of flash-lights, emergency candles, food and bottled water seemed to be the hot items of the day. With ice in the forecast we Oklahomans know how to get prepared. I remember one time about 15 years ago, I received a telephone call from one of Jim's bosses of an oil company who had recently moved from California to Enid. He was watching T.V. one evening and the small picture appeared on his TV, that said this area was under an ice storm warning. This poor guy was beside himself. He had no idea what that met or where he should go. I kid you not the guy was near hysteria. He told me he had read about tornadoes and how to prepare for them. But he knew nothing about ice storms or even heard of such a thing. He wanted to know what a ice storm was and was this ice the same thing that went in glasses. Needless to say it was very difficult to try to explain an ice storm and all he should do and expect from one to a gentleman who had never been beyond the state of California.
An Enid man, Miketax Lawson, 34, was arrested following a high speed pursuit Thursday afternoon after Enid PD officers attempted to make a felony drug warrant stop.

Enid PD, Garfield County and Grant Sheriff’s department units ended the pursuit, after the driver failed to make the intersection at highway 81 and 64 in Grant County. “The driver of the car hit the curb at the intersection and fliped twice coming to rest on it's wheels and kept driving north on Red Hill road till the motor lock. The last few miles the car was only traveling about 20 mph.” said Sergeant Chris Bush of the EPD.

Additional drug charges are anticipated to be file on Lawson, after an inventory of his vehicle revealed drug items.

A bus full of Oklahoma Bible Academy students hit an Enid police officer who was involved in the high-speed chase, sending the officer and several students to the hospital.

The wreck occurred at the intersection of Purdue and Cleveland shortly after noon Thursday. Details of exactly how the accident occurred are not yet available.

Officer Duane Andrews, an Enid DARE officer, was treated and released from St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center later in the afternoon. OBA headmaster Paul MacDonald said six students were sent to an area hospital “to be checked out” following the collision.

“We just wanted to make sure they were all right,” he said. “The kids were shook up.”

The bus carried about 60 7th and 8th grade students, who were returning from the KOFM Classic basketball tournament.

Andrews was in pursuit of Miketax M. Lawson, 34, who was arrested about three miles north of U.S. 81 and Highway 64.

For more details, photographs and information on the wreck, see Friday’s Enid News & Eagle.

A bus full of Okahoma Bible Academy students hit an Enid police officer who was involved in a high-speed chase, sending the officer and several students to the hospital.

The wreck occurred at the intersection of Purdue and Cleveland shortly after noon Thursday. Details of exactly how the accident occurred are not yet available.

Officer Duane Andrews, an Enid DARE officer, was treated and released from St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center later in the afternoon. OBA headmaster Paul MacDonald said six students were sent to an area hospital “to be checked out” following the collision.

“We just wanted to make sure they were all right,” he said. “The kids were shook up.”

The bus carried about 60 7th and 8th grade students, who were returning from the KOFM Classic basketball tournament.

Andrews was in pursuit of Miketax M. Lawson, 34, who was arrested about three miles north of U.S. 81 and Highway 64.

For more details, photographs and information on the wreck, see Friday’s Enid News & Eagle.

An Enid man, Miketax Lawson, 34, was arrested following a high speed pursuit Thursday afternoon after Enid PD officers attempted to make a felony drug warrant stop.

Enid PD, Garfield County and Grant Sheriff’s department units ended the pursuit, after the driver failed to make the intersection at highway 81 and 64 in Grant County. “The driver of the car hit the curb at the intersection and fliped twice coming to rest on it's wheels and kept driving north on Red Hill road till the motor lock. The last few miles the car was only traveling about 20 mph.” said Sergeant Chris Bush of the EPD.

Additional drug charges are anticipated to be file on Lawson, after an inventory of his vehicle revealed drug items.

Robyn Rapp, Grant County Extension Educator Family & Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development will be the presenter for an educational lesson titled Stress and Relaxation Techniques at 10:00am, Thursday December 20 at the Grant County OSU Cooperative Extension Office, 112 E. Guthrie Room 301 Courthouse Medford, Oklahoma. The public is invited to attend. For more information call Robyn Rapp, Grant County Extension Educator Family & Consumer Sciences/4-H Youth Development at 580-395-2134 or email robyn.rapp@okstate.edu.
Oklahoma ’s longstanding heritage of enjoying the outdoors is going on display at the Oklahoma History Center next spring to showcase the traditions enjoyed by so many Oklahomans over the years, and the help of Oklahoma ’s outdoorsmen is needed to make the event a success.

In April 2008, the Oklahoma Historical Society will bring you over 2000 square feet of outdoor exhibition titled Field, Forest & Stream: The History of Oklahomans and the Outdoors. The exhibit will be located at the Oklahoma History Center , near the state capitol, and will include historic artifacts, images and photography, audio-visual elements and hands-on interaction relating to the outdoors in Oklahoma .

“We are hoping to make this a fun learning experience for visitors of all ages,” said David Davis, curator of special exhibits for the Oklahoma History Center . “A walk down the exhibit’s Forest Trail will reveal beautiful taxidermy dioramas and an interactive hunting blind. A feature about Oklahoma catfish noodling in the exhibit’s Water Trail will allow our more adventurous guests to experience the tactile sensations of this unique sport. A lifelike campfire in the Camp Trail area will set the mood as visitors will have the opportunity to sit and listen to camp stories told by historic Oklahoma figures. These are just a few of the interesting features our guests will find in the Field, Forest & Stream Exhibit So, far we have received a lot of great support for this project. Not only does the Oklahoma History Center already have some very interesting, outdoor related artifacts ready to display, but we are also relying on Oklahomans to help us make this exhibition great.”

Field, Forest , & Stream: The History of Oklahomans and the Outdoors will be made possible through the support and participation of individuals, groups, and businesses such as the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, outdoor television producer Don Wallace and the producers of the On the Water In the Woods television show. Additionally, the Wildlife Department and the Oklahoma Museum of History at the Oklahoma History Center are calling on the people of Oklahoma for donations of historical artifacts, documents, and images related to hunting, fishing, camping, bird watching, wildlife photography, and all other outdoor activities in Oklahoma . Items such as Oklahoma-related fishing lures, hunting calls, clothing, camping gear, boats, canoes, boating equipment, family photos and journals of outdoor experiences in Oklahoma are just a few of the things needed to complete the Field, Forest, & Stream exhibit project.

“If Oklahoma ’s sportsmen come together to help with this project, it will make the exhibit even better,” said Micah Holmes, information supervisor for the Wildlife Department. “What better way celebrate our state’s outdoor history than by including pieces of our own past? I would highly encourage hunters and anglers to consider donating items for the Field, Forest & Stream exhibit.”

As the historical museum for the state of Oklahoma , the Oklahoma Museum of History’s mission is to collect, preserve, and share all things related to the history of Oklahoma . Special exhibitions such as Field, Forest , & Stream not only allow the museum to interpret and display interesting aspects of that history, but also allow for the opportunity to strengthen the museum’s artifact collections in areas that are not fully represented. Those interested in sharing their own outdoor heritage by donating their Oklahoma-related outdoor items should contact David Davis, curator of special exhibits, at (405) 522-0780 or e-mail ddavis@okhistory.org.

The Oklahoma History Center is an 18-acre, 215,000 square-foot learning center exploring Oklahoma ’s unique history through Smithsonian quality museum exhibits and a state-of-the-art research library. The new home of the Oklahoma Historical Society, the Oklahoma History Center is located just east of the State Capitol in Oklahoma City . The Oklahoma Historical Society was originally organized in 1893 and continues today as a statewide center for learning, preserving, and promoting the history and heritage of the diverse people of Oklahoma through its museum, research, outreach, and historic preservation divisions. The Oklahoma Historical Society serves people of all generations by promoting appreciation and understanding of Oklahoma ’s rich history and the impact of that history on the present. For more information call (405) 522-0765 or visit okhistorycenter.org.

Luminarias slated Dec. 9

The Caldwell, Kan. Luminaries are scheduled Sunday, Dec. 9 from 6-8 p.m. A five-block lane, lighted only by luminaria (candles in sand in brown paper bags), portray scenes from the Last Supper to the three empty crosses and the empty tomb.

Waterfowl Report for December 5, 2007

For zone maps and complete waterfowl hunting regulations log on to wildlifedepartment.com

Northwest

Canton: Lake level is 0.32 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. High water levels through out the spring limited native forage growth in shallow portions of the lake. Winter wheat is in fair to good condition. Row crops in the area have been harvested and are in good to excellent condition. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement into the area has increased the last couple of weeks. The boat ramp west of the Wildlife Management Area headquarters is usable as is all boat ramps on the south side of the lake.

Ft. Supply : Lake level is 0.16 ft above normal. Habitat conditions around the lake are fair. Local wheat crops in the area range from fair to poor in condition. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area has been low, but expected to increase with cold front.

Washita National Wildlife Refuge: Duck numbers: wigeon 207; mallard 84; gadwall 23; ring-necked 87; bufflehead 25; shoveller 25; canvasback 30; redhead 41; pintail 45. Goose numbers: Canada 84,356; snow 8,848.

Southwest

Ft. Cobb: Lake level is 0.88 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair along shoreline. All summer crops have been harvested with some residue left. Duck numbers are low, but increasing with each passing front. Goose numbers are good, with large flocks going west to feed on private land.

Hackberry: Refuge reservoir is approximately 4 foot below conservation pool, with around 300 acres of wetland units flooded. Habitat conditions are fair. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are good. Hunter activity is moderate. Hunter success is low. Duck numbers are increasing. Goose numbers are steadily increasing. Hackberry Flat Waterfowl Refuge Portion is closed to all activity from October 15 to January 31.

Mtn. Park : Lake level is 0.65 ft. below normal. Habitat condition is fair. Flooded salt cedar around the lake is providing some cover. Winter wheat is fair on the Wildlife Management Area. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are good, with large numbers in large groups. A large number of geese are using the west side of the Wildlife Management Area.

Waurika: Lake level is 0.18 ft. above normal. Lake habitat condition is poor. Area wheat fields have been planted, and some fields are in good condition. Summer floods greatly affected food plots and wetland units. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is low. Waterfowl numbers have slightly increased over the past week. Flooding has begun on wetland units immediately south of SH 53 and Walker Creek .

Northeast

Copan: Lake level is 0.29 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. Flooded native plants in the area are in fair condition, with corn fields on the Wildlife Management Area in good condition. Duck numbers are high, with a lot of mallards using the moist soil units. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement continues to increase with every day. Plenty of flooded vegetation present to hold birds.

Eufaula: Lake level is 1.45 ft. below normal. Current habitat condition is very poor due to high summer lake levels that prevented planting of Japanese millet. Very little farming in the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area is low.

Ft. Gibson: Lake level is 1.34 ft. below normal. Habitat condition is good. Due to the extreme high water throughout summer and early fall the vegetation is in poor shape. There are some agricultural crops in the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area is slow.

Hulah: Lake level is 0.24 ft. above normal. Lake level is not flooding terrestrial vegetation. Wheat is coming up in various fields. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area has been low.

Kaw: Lake level is at normal conservation pool. Habitat condition is fair. No millet available in the area, but good native food available. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are fair. Bird movement in the area is low.

Keystone: Lake level is 1.0 ft. below normal. Habitat conditions are poor, with almost no food available due to prolonged summer flooding on the lake. Both duck and goose numbers are low. Little migration has been seen in the past few days on the area. Hunters utilizing the area this year should be prepared for very deep mud. Caution should be taken, especially if hunting alone.

Oologah: Lake level is 0.55 ft. above normal. Current habitat conditions are poor to fair. No flooded millet or native vegetation on the lake. Ag fields have been re-planted due to flood conditions this summer, and are currently in poor condition. Duck numbers are poor to fair, with some gadwalls and mallards present. Goose numbers are fair, with some Giant Canadians and snows seen in the area. Bird movement continues to increase with colder weather. There are three units with water at Overcup Bottoms Wetland Development Unit. Upper Verdigris Wetland Development Unit has a few Gadwalls and both units are 90% capacity. Contact the area biologist for information.

Sooner: Lake level is near average. Current habitat conditions are poor. Winter wheat in the area is in fair to poor condition. Duck numbers in the area are low. Goose numbers are fair. Not much waterfowl movement is present in the area, but movement is expected to increase with cold front.

Webbers Falls: Lake level is 3.16 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is good, with smartweed, barnyardgrass, bidens, cut soybeans, corn, milo and wheat in the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area is slow.

Southeast

Grassy Slough : Wetlands approximately 60% full. Habitat condition is good. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. No bird movement noted in the area.

Hugo: Lake level is 0.10 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. Very good acorn crop in the area for when water gets up in the river. Duck numbers are fair. Goose numbers are very low. Bird movement in the area is really picking up. Best hunting is in the shallows and creeks as they flow into the river.

Little River National Wildlife Refuge: Lake level is good, with good food conditions. Duck numbers: wood duck 375; gadwall 420; mallard 145; wigeon 30. No geese observed.

Red Slough: Wetland units are averaging 70% full. Habitat conditions are excellent with plenty of wild forage. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. No bird movement noted in the area.

Texoma: Lake level is 2.42 ft. below normal. Due to high water levels which persisted through out the growing season no millet or very little native food is available. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are poor. A small increase in bird movement due to split in season.

Wister: Lake level is 0.21 ft. below normal. Habitat conditions are good on the development areas, and poor on the lake. Smartweed, sedges and acorns are present on the area. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Some birds moved through the area, but none are staying. All development units on are currently at 100% for second half.

FISHING REPORT FOR NOVEMBER 28, 2007

CENTRAL

Thunderbird: Elevation normal, water clear. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 8-10 ft. on structure. White bass good on inline spinnerbaits, jigs and sassy shad at 6-8 ft. off points and humps. Report submitted by Tony Woodruff, game warden stationed in Cleveland County .

NORTHEAST

Eucha: Elevation slightly below normal, water 51 and dingy. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows at 16-18 feet around brush and structure. Largemouth fair on spinnerbaits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries

Greenleaf: Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass fair on deep diving bill baits and crankbaits. Channel catfish fair on stinkbaits and cut baits on bottom. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at fishing docks. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

Kaw: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water 54 and clear. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair below dam. Catfish fair on shad with juglines below dam and upper end of lake. Blue catfish excellent in confluence of Coon Creek (from the bank in the Coon Creek campground) and the Arkansas River on fresh cut shad and from a boat on rod and reel and jug fishing. Striped bass hybrid population is increasing in Kaw Lake . Crappie good at 12-15 ft. near brush. Report submitted by Larry Green, game warden stationed in Osage County .

Keystone: Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits, jigs and chunkbaits at 4-8 ft. in creeks and coves. Smallmouth bass fair on crankbaits, jigs and chunkbaits at 6-10 ft. in deep coves. Spotted bass fair on crankbaits, jigs and chunkbaits at 6-10 ft. in main lake pockets. White bass fair on rat-l-traps and roostertails at 3-6 ft. along points and creeks. Striped bass fair on live shad and storm swim shad at 3-6 ft. below dam. Channel catfish fair on worms at 4-8 ft. in creeks and coves. Blue catfish fair on cut shad at 6-10 ft. at Cimarron River flats. Flathead catfish fair on live shad at 6-10 ft. in riprap. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 10-18 ft. at docks. Report submitted by Woody’s Bait and Tackle.

Sooner: Catfish fair on live and cut baits off Hwy 15. Report submitted by Doug Gottschalk, game warden stationed in Noble County .

Spavinaw: Elevation slightly below normal, water 52 and dingy. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows around the dam area. Largemouth fair on spinner baits. Report submitted by Dwight Moore, City of Tulsa Fisheries .

Webbers Falls: Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on jigs and worms along riprap and creek channels. Channel catfish fair on stinkbaits and cut baits on bottom. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at bridges and brush structure. Report submitted by Lark Wilson, game warden stationed in Muskogee County .

NORTHWEST

Canton: Elevation normal. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near brush piles. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County .

SOUTHEAST

Arbuckle: Elevation 1 ft. below normal, water 61 and stained. Crappie good on chartreuse jigs off docks and marked brush piles. Sand bass good on slab spoons off creek channel drop-offs. Bass fishing fair to good on crankbaits and some jigs. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Blue River: Elevation normal, water 49 and clear. Largemouth bass slow on minnows and flies. Channel catfish fair on liver and worms. Trout good on power baits, super dupers, mealworms and roostertails. Report submitted by Charles Baker, technician at Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

Broken Bow: Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on jigs and worms around points and islands. Catfish good on jugs with sunfish. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around structure. Walleye biting on deep-running crankbaits after dark around islands and points. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County .

Eufaula: Elevation 1 1/2 ft. above normal, water clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits at 4-8 ft. in rocks. White bass slow. Blue catfish fair on shad drifting the flats. Crappie good on minnows and jigs at 8-15 ft. around boat docks. Report submitted by Ed Rodebush, game warden stationed in McIntosh County .

Konawa: Elevation normal, water 57 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on crankbaits at 15 ft. Report submitted by Daryl Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County .

McGee Creek: Elevation normal, water 62 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on soft plastic lures off rocky points. Crappie fair on minnows at 16-25 ft. over cedar brush. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County .

Pine Creek: Elevation below normal, water clear. Bass fair on Carolina-rigged lizards at 10-15 ft. Crappie fair on minnows. Channel catfish fair on punchbaits and nightcrawlers around the old bridge. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, Game Warden Stationed in McCurtain County

Robert S. Kerr: Elevation below normal, water 54 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on plastic baits at 6-8 ft. in rock cover next to deeper water. Crappie being caught on minnows at 10 ft. around edges and bends in the old creek channels. White bass fair on jigs at10 ft. below Webbers Falls dam. Blue catfish biting on fresh cut bait at 8-12 ft. drifting the old Arkansas River channel. Report submitted by Rick Olzawski, game warden for Haskell County .

Sardis: Elevation normal. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and plugs in coves. White bass and walleye slow trolling. Blue and flathead catfish fair on juglines and trotlines with live bait, shrimp and cut bait. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County .

Wister: Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair to good on spinnerbaits at drop-offs. Crappie slow. Channel and blue catfish fair on juglines with liver. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in LeFlore County .

SOUTHWEST

Altus-Lugert: Elevation 8 1/4 ft. below normal and rising. Fishing is fair. Trout good on corn. Report submitted by Sue Hokanson, Quartz Mountain State Park .

Ellsworth: Elevation above normal, water murky. Catfish slow. Crappie fair to good on minnows and jigs at Ralph’s Resort, with reports of 1 1/2 lb. crappie being caught. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

Foss: Elevation 1/2 ft. below normal, water clear. Striped bass hybrids good on slabs or eyeballs in early mornings on south side of lake. Catfish fair on stinkbait. Crappie fair on live bait. Walleye slow. Report submitted by Eric Puyear, B & K Bait House.

Lawtonka: Elevation above normal, crappie fair on jigs and minnows around dam. Report submitted by Mike Carroll, game warden stationed in Comanche County .

These values represent statistics for the day in progress.

They do NOT represent final daily values.

Statistical data for Medford: December 1, 2007 ( since midnight CST)

Class Parameter Value Time (CST)

Air Temperature Maximum Temperature 62 F 3:40 pm

Minimum Temperature 40 F 2:00 am

Average Temperature 51 F

Dewpoint Temperature Maximum Dewpoint Temperature 60 F 3:35 pm

Minimum Dewpoint Temperature 29 F 12:05 am

Average Dewpoint Temperature 49 F

Relative Humidity Maximum Relative Humidity 98 % 6:35 am

Minimum Relative Humidity 58 % 12:05 am

Average Relative Humidity 93 %

10 cm Soil Temperature (sod) Maximum TS10 Soil Temperature 50 F 3:30 pm

Minimum TS10 Soil Temperature 45 F 12:15 am

Average TS10 Soil Temperature 47 F

10 cm Soil Temperature (bare) Maximum TB10 Soil Temperature 52 F 3:30 pm

Minimum TB10 Soil Temperature 45 F 3:45 am

Average TB10 Soil Temperature 47 F

Barometric Pressure Maximum Barometric Pressure 28.96 in 12:05 am

Minimum Barometric Pressure 28.49 in 3:40 pm

Average Barometric Pressure 28.71 in

Wind Speed Maximum Wind Speed 44 mph 10:50 am

Average Wind Speed 17 mph

Wind Direction Prevailing Wind Direction SSE (30%)

Secondary Wind Direction SE (23%)

Rainfall Rainfall 0.07 in

Solar Radiation Maximum Solar Radiation 92 W/m2 3:35 pm

Total Solar Radiation 0.8 MJ/m2

Furbearer season opens Dec. 1

December 1 marks the opening day of furbearer season in Oklahoma , offering outdoorsmen the chance to hone their outdoor skills, harvest a variety of game species and perhaps earn some extra cash in the process.

Leo Farmer of Muskogee is a trapper who says that harvesting furbearers is not only important for predator management, but also for helping in the management of other wildlife. He also said his time spent trapping makes him a more skilled sportsman.

“We have to study the animals that we are trying to trap,” Farmer said. “It definitely makes you a better outdoorsman. I’m a much better deer hunter now than I was 10 years ago. Ten years ago, I didn’t trap. Now, I’m studying all animals. And I’m learning a lot about deer just by being conscious of looking for sign.”

Furbearing animals include raccoons, minks, badgers, muskrats, opossums, weasels, bobcats, beavers, skunks, river otters and gray and red foxes to name a few, and many hunters and trappers harvest these furbearers and sell their pelts. Check the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide” for requirements on tagging, selling and possessing furbearing wildlife.

In recent years, bobcat pelts have generally sold for higher prices than other furbearing species.

Hunters and trappers tagged 7,741 bobcats during the 2006-07 season, which was a 21-year high according to biologists with the Wildlife Department. The good news continued for sportsmen when they sold their furs. The values of bobcat pelts were the highest they had been since the 1987-88 season, with the average pelt selling for about $63.

Glen Johnson, a licensed Oklahoma fur buyer and owner of KanOkla Fur Company located on the Oklahoma/Kansas border, said that he usually pays anywhere from $80-$175 for top quality Oklahoma bobcats. But bobcat pelts of lower quality can sell for considerably less. According to Johnson, bobcat prices have risen because of higher demand overseas in places such as Italy , where he said he does most of his fur selling.

Johnson said bobcat pelts taken later in the season can sell for more than those taken earlier, and since Oklahoma ’s bobcat season spans Dec. 1, 2007 – Feb. 28, 2008; statewide, sportsmen have the opportunity to harvest a bobcat when its pelt is at its best. According to Johnson, pelts from species like raccoon are at their best when taken earlier in the furbearer season. Seasons on raccoon, badger, mink, muskrat, opossum, weasel and gray and red fox run Dec. 1, 2007 – Jan. 31, 2008, statewide; river otters can be taken Dec. 1, 2007 – Jan. 31, 2008 in select counties. Beaver, nutria, striped skunk and coyote seasons are open year-round statewide. Check the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide” for open areas, daily limits and other important regulations for each furbearer species.

For a list of fur buyers in Oklahoma , log on to the Wildlife Department’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com/furdeal.htm.

A hunting license and fishing and hunting legacy permit are required for all residents and nonresidents who hunt or trap furbearers in Oklahoma , unless exempt. Additionally, those wanting to take bobcats, river otters, raccoons or gray or red fox must possess a fur license. It costs $10 for residents or $51 for non-residents. Resident lifetime hunting or combination license holders are exempt from having to purchase the fur license.

In addition to a valid hunting license and fur license, a trapping license is required for all persons who trap. The cost is $10 for residents and $345 for nonresidents. A resident professional trapping license for the use of more than 20 traps costs $68.50. Only resident landowners or tenants or their children who trap on land they own or lease (not including hunting leases) are exempt from purchasing trapping licenses.

Hunters and trappers are also reminded that all bobcat pelts must be tagged with an official identification tag, available from several Department installations and selected check stations statewide. For a list of bobcat check stations, log on to the Department's Web site at wildlifedepartment.com or contact the Wildlife Division at (405) 521-2739.

Early winter angling heating up

Early winter fishing is great right now according to biologists with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, and Oklahomans focused only on current hunting seasons are in danger of missing it.

“Fall and early winter is an absolutely gorgeous time to go fishing,” said Gary Peterson, fisheries biologist for the Wildlife Department. “Once the bass tournaments are over and deer season begins, there are fewer people on the lakes and rivers. It is quieter without boats roaring by, and many fish species are more willing to bite. In northeast Oklahoma , the osprey fly in and go fishing with you, and sometimes eagles try to steal the osprey’s catch.”

Peterson noted that while some fish species prove more elusive in cooler temperatures, others are active and abundant.

“Crappie actually are more active as the weather gets colder, and we’ve found some nice blue cats and channel catfish out there,” Peterson said.

Crappie, blue catfish and channel catfish aren’t the only catch awaiting winter anglers.

“Right now is prime time for trout,” said James Vincent, senior fisheries biologist with the Department. “For streams and rivers in southern Oklahoma , this is our Monday Night Football game, and we’re getting ready to kick off.”

Vincent points out several advantages to fishing this time of year.

“During the summer, trout areas often have diverse usage like swimming and boating, and trout are not as willing to bite,” Vincent said. “However, those other users are gone now. Our cooler weather has brought cooler water, making it ‘go’ time for trout fishing, especially in the Lower Illinois and the Lower Mountain Fork rivers.”

Trout are not the only fish to catch, however.

“A few weeks of prime fall fishing for the native smallmouth bass still remain,” Vincent said.

For Oklahoma anglers who venture out in winter temperatures, Northcentral Region Fisheries Supervisor Bill Wentroth urges anglers to use common sense while fishing.

“It is vitally important that anglers stay dry in winter weather,” Wentroth said. “Enclosed fishing docks are good places to catch fish like crappie but also allow anglers to stay safe and comfortable.”

Consult the current “Oklahoma Fishing Guide” for a listing of enclosed docks throughout the state.

Statistics from 2006 reveal that over 611,000 anglers fished in Oklahoma last year, but the vast majority of those anglers fished in spring and summer. Even though there are great hunting opportunities right now, fisheries biologists hope Oklahomans won’t forget about angling. With such great fishing abundant in the state, and so few anglers taking advantage of it, it may be time to grab a fishing pole and head for water in the coming weeks.

“The fish are there,” Peterson said. “They are there, and they are available

Join the Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge and the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation for their annual Eagle Watches.

The rising popularity of the event has spurred some additions and changes to the schedule. They will now offer two viewing dates: Saturday, Jan. 5, and Saturday, Jan. 12.

To offer the best quality viewing experience, the number of visitors each date are limited and reservations required. The Eagle Watches are still free and currently both dates have available spots.

Visitors will report to the refuge headquarters at 4 p.m. and learn about the Bald Eagle’s natural history and then caravan to watch eagles coming into roost for the evening.

Those joining a watch are advised to bring a lawn chair and possibly a blanket, dress warmly in earth-tone colors. There will be no particular length of time for waiting patiently and quietly for the eagles to come to roost.

Come earlier and learn to identify other winter birds in a program and tour at the Byron State Fish Hatchery Watchable Wildlife Area. This program starts at 1 p.m. Jan. 5 at the Watchable Wildlife Area located 2 miles north of Hwy 11 and 38 junction, then turn ½ mile west at the sign. Biologists and visitors will end the program with enough time to get to Salt Plans NWR by 4 p.m. for the Eagle Watch.

Oklahoma is visited by 700-1500 Bald Eagles every winter. Less than 30 years ago, there were fewer than 500 nesting pairs in the lower 48 states – causing the American icon to be listed as endangered. Due to wildlife management projects, the Bald Eagles now number with approximately 5700 known pairs in the lower 48 and has been downgraded from endangered to threatened.

The Bald Eagle success story gives hope for other endangered species and represents American strength and endurance. There is comfort in knowing that the Bald Eagle still soars.

For more information about the Eagle Watch, contact the refuge at 580-626-4794.

Grant County 4-H members performed in the Share-the-Fun contest on Sunday, November 18, in the Pond Creek-Hunter School Auditorium.

Individual performances included Russell Rapp-Wakita 4-H with a Percussion Solo, Greg Martinez-Pond Creek-Hunter 4-H with a Vocal Solo, Erin Hopkins-Pond Creek-Hunter 4-H with a Vocal Solo, and Teka Marsh-Pond Creek-Hunter 4-H with a Vocal Solo.

In the Small Group category Russell Rapp and Jennifer George performed a Percussion Duet, Greg Martinez and Erin Hopkins sang a duet, and Ashley Dillon and Rachael Hopkins did a humorous skit.

Pond Creek-Hunter 4-H had a large group act with the following members Tiarra Davis, Shyanne Howard, Rachael Hopkins, Ashley Dillon, Kally Marsh, Devon Dillon, Erin Hopkins, Teka Marsh, and Greg Martinez.

Jessica Hopkins and Samantha Hopkins each sang a solo in the Cloverbud Division.

Everyone received a blue ribbon.

Selected to participate in the Northwest District Share-the-Fun Saturday, Ashley Dillon and Rachael Hopkins, and Large Group Pond Creek-Hunter 4-H.December 1, at Fairview Public School were: Individual- Erin Hopkins, Small Group-

Medford was full of all the hustle and bustle of the Christmas holiday season Wednesday. City employees were busy decorating the city and hanging lights on light poles, preparing for the arrival Santa Claus’s annual visit and the Lighting Ceremony of the Nativity Scene on the courthouse lawn.
Santa Claus offered Greetings from the North Pole, Wednesday evening when he made his annual visit to Medford and greeted area boys and girls at Marge’s Lunch Box.

Santa Claus lives at the North Pole with his wife, a crew of industrious elves, and a stable of magical, flying reindeer. While most of his year is likely spent making toys and tallying the "naughty" and "nice" acts of hundreds of millions of individual children, on the night of December 24 Santa visits the houses of all good boys and girls on the planet to deliver gifts. Though famous for his alleged ability to enter and exit houses quickly and silently through chimneys, he has proved himself equally adept at accessing more modern households and apartments, which may not have open fireplaces.

It’s that time of the year to open boxes of Christmas joy and fill the night with beautiful colorful twinkling lights.

The Christmas Holidays of 2007 officially began Monday in downtown Pond Creek with the hanging of the holiday light’s on the large tree located in PC-H FFA Park. Mike Peterman, Ford Simpson and Chris Gibson did a wonderful job of bring forth this 2007 Christmas season

Child Enrichment Club Makes Christmas a Little Happier For Area Angels

The Child Enrichment Club has placed area angels on the Christmas tree located in the Pond Creek city office. The Angel Tree provides much needed clothing items, special need gifts and other wished-for toys to children in the PC-H school district.

The Child Enrichment Club needs your help with the Angel tree. There are 49 angel names this year. The children all live in the Pond Creek-Hunter school district that includes Pond Creek, Hunter, Nash and Jefferson and are aged three months through 18 years. The suggested limit on the gifts is $30.00. Please help make this a happier Christmas for area angels.

When you pick an angel from the angel tree, take it to the counter and put your name, phone number and the number of the angel you chose on the sign up sheet. Shop for your angel using the information on the paper angel. Wrap the gift and attach the angel to the gift. Please return the gifts to the Pond Creek city office and place them by the angel tree before Dec. 15.

If you have not returned your angel gifts before the deadline, someone will call and remind you.

Diana Easterly with the Child Enrichment Club is shown placing angels on this year’s Christmas tree the tree is located in the Pond Creek city office.

Once upon a Christmas Season

A sweet young man who’s named Heath

Created a Christmas tree for all to see

Here’s wishing him a season full of joy and peace!

Jackson new Hospice chaplain

Hospice Circle of Love has hired a new chaplain. Jeff Jackson began his position with the organization in late October.

As a hospice chaplain, Jackson will provide spiritual support to patients who request chaplain services. Services include such things as praying with the patient, providing a listening ear and offering communion.

Jackson graduated from Oklahoma Baptist University in 1990. He served as pastor at First Baptist Church in Medford for three years in the early 1990s and has worked at various other churches across the state.

For the past 15 months, Jackson was the chaplain for another hospice in Enid.

Jackson said he discovered this type of work was a good fit for him after spending two weeks in the hospital with a family whose son was in a coma.

He says he has a desire to help people in a crisis.

“In our line of work, we have an opportunity to provide support to people who need spiritual help but wouldn’t ask for it in any other way. It really is a calling for me,” he said.

Jackson replaces The Rev. Sherry Shaw, who retired from Hospice Circle of Love in September.

Charges were filed November 26th in Grant county district court, after a deer stand was broken into and two portable heaters were taken.

Robert Dean Taylor, 49, Southhard, Oklahoma, was charged with two felonies, burglary in the second degree and possession of firearms after former conviction of a felony. Also filed on Taylor was supplemental information after former conviction for unlawful distribution of marijuana in 1992 and a 1993 conviction in Garfield County for possession of contraband in a penal institution.

According to court records, a report of vandalism and theft was reported to the Grant county Sheriffs’s department of a deer stand two miles north and one mile west of highway 60 on the five mile road in Grant County.

The owner of the deer stand, according to court documents, reported that when he went to his deer stand he found someone had destroyed a deer feeder and entered the deer stand, which two portable heaters were missing. The owner also advised that he had observed two individuals at his deer feeder the night before while inside his stand. That when he got out of the deer stand he tried to approach them, but they jumped back into their red Chevy pickup and left driving eastbound across the wheat field. The truck stopped at a barn located in the center of the property where there was a white flatbed pickup sitting unoccupied.

Under sheriff Wilkerson, state Wildlife Ranger Marshal Reigh and Deputy Brittain went to the location where the offense had occurred, they made contact with Taylor who was asleep in a tent inside the barn.

Two portable heaters that matched the description were found lying on the bed of Roberts Chevy pick up.

Roberts stated he did not know anything about the heaters or how they got on his pickup..

A rife leaning up against the wall of the barn and a pistol and another rife were found inside the tent where Roberts was sleeping. When officers ask Roberts if the firearms were his Roberts allegedly stated yes.

This crime is punishable by imprisonment for one to ten years.

Long time Medford Lions Club member J.D. Edmonson celebrated his 98 birthday recently and served birthday cake and ice cream to fellow Lions members during their Tuesday night meeting November 20th
During a scheduled work day at Medford’s Golf Course Saturday, Harvey Bush and John Benningfield are pictured removing several dead trees that have died over the past year. Other repairs and maintenance such as throwing away unused items and fixing a damage door was also addressed Saturday morning.

2 (64 ounce) bottles Ocean spray Cranberry/GA Peach juice

8 cinnamon sticks

1 1/2 teaspoon whole cloves

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup Spleanda

Pour the juices in a pot and bring to a boil. Meanwhile, make pouch for the spices. Using cheese cloth (or a new Hand Wipe), place the spices in center of cloth and secure with cooking twine (or a rubber band). When the juices are boiling, drop in the pouch. Turn off heat and steep for about 10 minutes. Serve hot.

A one vehicle rollover accorded on Oklahoma 132 4.2 miles north of Nash, Sunday evening after an under age Pond Creek driver lost control and rolled a 1998 Ford Ranger pickup. The driver, according to the Oklahoma Highway patrol reports was, Stuart Blaine Strait, 15.

According to the report Strait was transported by the Pond Creek EMS to Bass hospital in Enid, treated and released.

A passenger, Brock T. Phillips, 13, Nash was transported also by Pond Creek EMS to St. Mary’s Hospital in Enid admitted with internal trunk and leg injuries. Phillips was listed Sunday night in stable condition.

According to the report, Strait was northbound on SH 132 when the driver lost control for an unknown reason, the vehicle entered into a broad slide skid and traveled 154 feet before striking a culvert and ejecting Phillips 49 feet from the impact. The vehicle rolled two times coming to rest on its wheels. Seatbelts were equipped but not in use. The cause of the collision was listed an unsafe speed for an inexperienced driver.

The accident was investigated by troopers Robert Cottrill and Jeff Jech, Grant County sheriff’s office, Hawley Fire department and the Pond Cree Fire and Rescue

As Christmas draws closer, lights and decorations awaken from their year-long slumber, are pulled from boxes and containers and placed in homes, trees, windows, and doors. Don't forget "The Christmas Lighting Ceremony' will be held on the Courthouse lawn at 6:00 p.m. on Sunday
Mesonet Statistical Data for Medford, Oklahoma.

These values represent statistics for the day in progress.

They do NOT represent final daily values.

Statistical data for Medford: November 22, 2007 ( since midnight CST)

Class Parameter Value Time (CST)

Air Temperature Maximum Temperature 29 F 9:40 am

Minimum Temperature 17 F 7:05 am

Average Temperature 22 F

Dewpoint Temperature Maximum Dewpoint Temperature 23 F 12:05 am

Minimum Dewpoint Temperature 14 F 7:05 am

Average Dewpoint Temperature 19 F

Relative Humidity Maximum Relative Humidity 92 % 7:25 am

Minimum Relative Humidity 72 % 9:40 am

Average Relative Humidity 87 %

10 cm Soil Temperature (sod) Maximum TS10 Soil Temperature 48 F 12:15 am

Minimum TS10 Soil Temperature 45 F 9:30 am

Average TS10 Soil Temperature 46 F

10 cm Soil Temperature (bare) Maximum TB10 Soil Temperature 47 F 12:15 am

Minimum TB10 Soil Temperature 41 F 9:30 am

Average TB10 Soil Temperature 43 F

Barometric Pressure Maximum Barometric Pressure 29.39 in 9:35 am

Minimum Barometric Pressure 29.27 in 12:55 am

Average Barometric Pressure 29.31 in

Wind Speed Maximum Wind Speed 11 mph 8:50 am

Average Wind Speed 6 mph

Wind Direction Prevailing Wind Direction NNW (42%)

Secondary Wind Direction WNW ( 8%)

Rainfall Rainfall 0.00 in

Solar Radiation Maximum Solar Radiation 347 W/m2 9:35 am

Total Solar Radiation 1.5 MJ/m2

Pheasant season opens December 1

With the start of December comes the kick-off of pheasant season in Oklahoma , running Dec. 1 – Jan. 31.

According to Doug Schoeling, upland game bird biologist with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, hunters could be in for a successful season despite some limited visibility.

“With the abundant cover we have this year, pheasants could be harder to see, but there should be a lot of birds for hunters to chase,” Schoeling said. “According to roadside brood surveys, it looks like the pheasants had a good hatch this year.”

The ring-necked pheasant was first introduced into Oklahoma in 1911 and are a popular game bird from northcentral Oklahoma to the Panhandle. The colorful birds prefer cultivated farmland habitat mixed with weedy fencerows and overgrown pastures.

Hunters should consult the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide” for open zones and wildlife management areas. The daily bag limit for pheasants is two cocks, with a possession limit of four after the first day and six after the second day. Pheasant hunters should note that legal shooting hours are official sunrise to official sunset, except on some wildlife management areas, which close at 4:30 p.m. Evidence of sex (head or one foot) must remain on the bird until it reaches its final destination. When the deer gun and the special antlerless deer seasons (in open zones) overlap with pheasant season, all pheasant hunters must wear either a hunter orange cap or vest.

Before going afield, be sure to pick up a copy of the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide,” available at all hunting and fishing license dealers or log onto wildlifedepartment.com. Resident and non-resident hunters must possess a valid hunting license and a fishing and hunting legacy permit or proof of exemption. The non-resident five-day hunting license is not valid for hunting pheasant.

Canton: Lake level is 0.18 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. High water levels through out the spring limited native forage growth in shallow portions of the lake. Winter wheat is in fair to good condition. Row crops in the area have been harvested and are in good to excellent condition. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird numbers are expected on increase with cold front. Hunting activity is low, with moderate success. Very little movement has been observed over the past week. The boat ramp west of the Wildlife Management Area headquarters is usable as is all boat ramps on the south side of the lake.

Ft. Supply : Lake level is 0.32 ft above normal. Habitat conditions around the lake are fair. Local wheat crops in the area range from fair to poor in condition. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Bird movement in the area has been low. Area is closed for the first 9 days of deer gun season

Kaw: Lake level is at 0.87 ft. above normal. Habitat condition is fair. No millet available in the area, but good native food available. Duck numbers are low. Goose numbers are low. Hunting activity is fair on weekends, with low success. Bird movement in the area is low. Numbers should increase with colder temperatures

Fishing report Canton: Elevation normal. Crappie good on minnows and jigs near brush. Walleye fair on nightcrawlers. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair drifting shad. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County.

Ft. Supply: Elevation below normal, water clear. Channel catfish good on stinkbaits. Report submitted by Mark Reichenberger, game warden stationed in Harper County.

1 pound of powdered sugar

1/2 cup cocoa

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup milk

1 Tablespoon vanilla extract

1/4 pound butter/margarine

1 cup chopped nuts

Mix all dry ingredients together in a 8x8 inch microwave safe pan (important to use this size pan). Add milk and vanilla extract. Place chunk of butter/margarine in center ( leave butter as whole do not chop up). Microwave on high for 2 minutes until bottom of dish feels warm. Stir vigorously and blend in chopped nuts. Put in mold or whatever and chill for 1 hour. * Use real butter for best results.

To celebrate Oklahoma’s Centennial Birthday, Nash Postmaster Charla Therrien held a special stamp cancellation November 16, 2007.

The cancellation designed by Jenna Cokely, a graduate of OSU and past president of the Nash stamp club. The design depicts “Hats Off to Oklahoma.” This being a tribute to Jenna’s great-great-great grandparents, who helped make this a great state.

Five other cancellation celebrations have been held in the past for the Nash post office;

“The Land Run of 1893, designed by Harvey Crabtree,

“Nashville to Nash” Nash Post office 100th Anniversary, designed by Kelly Deewall,

“Bethel Hawley Baptist Church 100th Anniversary” designed by Rev. Gary Lillie,

“150th Anniversary of the first U.S. postage stamp issued, designed by Jeremy Dershem then 12 years old 7th grader at the Pond Creek/Hunter school and secretary of the Nash Stamp Club.

Jenna Cokely was not able to attend the cancellation celebration.

Pictured----- from right to left are Terry Doty, Charla Therrien, Jeremy Dershem, and Pastor Gary Lillie.

Medford EMS department responded to a mid-morning accident Saturday Nov. 17th three miles south on Red Hill Road from Oklahoma 11 to a one-vehicle rollover.

According to OHP trooper Jeff Jech at the accident scene, Jeannie Horning, Wakita, was southbound on Red Hill Road talking to her brother Roy Horning when her vehicle tires dropped off the Westside of the roadway. According the report, Horning then over corrected, skidding 191 feet before hitting the west side of the embankment and rolling one-half times, leaving the 2003 Subaru on it top.

Jeannie Horning and her brother Roy Horning according to the troopers report, refused treatment at the accident scene. Seat belts were use and air bags did deploy.

Felony and misdemeanor drug charges were filed in Grant county district court November 13th after trooper Cottrill made a routine traffic stop.

Patricia Ann Gonzalis, Agra, was charged with one felony count of possession of controlled substance, and two misdemeanor counts of, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia, driving with license revoked, and a supplemental information after former conviction was also filed on Gonzalis for, possession of controlled drug with the intent to distribute in 2002 and 2007, in Pawnee and Tulsa counties.

According to court records, Cottrill was traveling east on Oklahoma 11 when he observed a white SUV pull from Main street of Deer Creek onto SH 11 and that there was not a tag displayed. After making contact with the driver, Gonzalis, when Cottrill asked to see her drivers license she allegedly told Cottrill that it was suspended. A search of the SUV allegedly revealed Marijuana, rolling papers, set of scales, 13 roaches and other drug paraphernalia.

A passenger in the SUV with Gonzalis, Charlas Harrison Davis, Agra, was charged with possession of controlled substance and supplemental information was also filed on Davis for being found guilty on the crime of unlawful possession of controlled drug with intent of distribute in 2007 in Tulsa County.

Bond was set for Gonzalis in the amount of $6,500

Festival of Angels To Start This Week

Ponca City's own lighting holiday magic begins this week for the 14th year. The Festival of Angels will open for the season Wednesday at 6 p.m. and displays will stay lit until 9 p.m.

The lighting celebration is Wednesday starting at 6 p.m. at Lake Ponca Park as the Festival of Angeles committee is sponsoring free hayrack rides through the park to view the lights, a marshmallow roast for all ages and Frosty will have his special treats of hot chocolate and holiday cookies. Parking will be near the shelter houses; watch for signs and be sure to dress warmly. All events for the evening are free.

A Festival of Angels map shows the way to the four city-wide locations of more than 260 animated light displays and miles of lights. The tour can begin at Lake Ponca Park where more than 450 acres of lights have filled the park; a candy cane awaits the children or a doggie treat for the family pet.

Travel to town on Lake Road past the Pioneer Woman Statue and see the 30-foot Angel Host dressed in all new blue lights — more than 1,200 bulbs — to celebrate Oklahoma's Centennial year.

Three blocks south of Angel Host is Cann Memorial Gardens at Fourteenth Street and Grand Avenue.

The theme is Enchanted Gardens which will be showcased in the 10-acre Botanical Gardens.

The fourth location is Marland's Grand Home at Tenth and Grand Avenue.

The theme is Oklahoma's Heritage in Lights with 24 animated light displays showing the great state as we celebrate her 100th birthday.

The Festival of Angels will continue through Dec. 30 from 6 to 10 p.m.

Now one of the largest holiday displays in Oklahoma and southern Kansas, the festival is hosted by volunteers that work year-round in maintaining and building new displays

OKLAHOMA PECAN PIE (syrup free)

2 8-inch pie crusts

1 c. brown sugar, packed

1 stick butter

2 t. flour

3 eggs, whisked

3/4 cup milk

1 c. sugar

2 c. pecans, chopped

Melt butter; pour into a mixing bowl. Add remaining ingredients; mix well. Pour into pieshell (s). Bake at 305 degrees for 35-45 minutes.

An election shall be held to elect a board member for office number three (3), on the first Tuesday in February, that being February 5, 2008 with a run-off election to be held on the first Tuesday in April, that being April 1, 2008 if no candidate for the board member position receives more than 50% of the vote. The polling places shall be open from 7:00 a.m. to 7 p.m.

The owners of Peter has claimed him and he is safely back home. He lived on 4th street.
The opening day of Deer gun season Nov. 17th showed a lot of activity. All Grant county check station reported numerous deer being checked in already by noon.

Chad Cink, Medford, is pictured with a deer he checked in in Medford at the Pioneer Pawn. The Buck was a 5 by 5 weighting in at 138 lbs. The Deer was taken in the northern part of Grant County.

Gary Aebi has found "Ace" Both Ace and Gary were very excited to see each other. Thanks to everyone who helped.
A lost black and white domestic rabbit was seen wondering around on south 4th street Thursday evening. Erma Kroutil has taken pity on the wondering rabbit and has given it a very short place to stay till the owner comes forward, or a new owner can be found.

Pet owners and parents need to be more responsible. What lessons are you teaching your children? If when you get tired of caring for your pet. JUST TURM IT LOOSE! There needs to be laws for abandonment for animals the same a child.

Canton : Elevation normal. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around brush piles. Channel catfish on stinkbait. White bass and striped bass hybrids fair trolling crankbaits and drifting shad. Report submitted by Mark Walker, game warden stationed in Blaine County
Gary Abei has lost a Bird Dog “ACE” He is Liver with spots. If anyone finds "ACE" Call Gary Aebi.

Deer gun season not far off

With deer muzzleloader season behind us and the current deer archery season open through Jan. 15, 2008, hunters statewide have already had ample opportunity to harvest a deer, but the most popular deer season in Oklahoma is still to come.

The opening day of deer gun season is Nov. 17 and will attract hundreds of thousands of sportsmen to the woods for 16 days of hunting.

Last year deer gun hunters made state history with a record gun season harvest of 72,263 deer. That total contributed to a combined season harvest record of 119,349 deer, over 18,000 more deer than in 2005, and more than 17,000 more deer than the previous combined season harvest record set in 2000.

According to Jerry Shaw, big game biologist for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, the Nov. 17-Dec. 2 deer season could be the best time to harvest a deer this year.

“There hasn’t been a lot of deer movement noted during archery and muzzleloader season so far this year,” Shaw said. “But the cooler it gets and the closer it gets to the rut, the more we’ll start seeing deer on the move.”

Resident deer gun hunters must have a hunting license and a fishing and hunting legacy permit or proof of exemption to hunt deer in Oklahoma. In addition, they must possess a deer gun license (antlered or antlerless) or proof of exemption for each deer hunted.

Resident youth hunters age 16 or 17 years old must purchase a youth hunting license and a $10 youth deer gun license (antlered or antlerless) for each deer hunted, unless exempt. Resident youth under 16 years of age are exempt from the purchase of a hunting license, but they must purchase a youth deer gun license for each deer hunted. All resident hunters under 18 years of age are exempt from the purchase of a fishing and hunting legacy permit.

One important thing for resident youth to remember is that they can use unfilled youth deer gun season licenses to hunt deer during the regular deer gun season. Additionally, those youth who did harvest a deer during the youth deer gun season can still hunt during the regular deer gun season as long as they purchase another youth deer gun license for each deer hunted and they stay within their legal annual combined limit of six deer, of which only two may be antlered.

Nonresident deer hunters are exempt from a hunting license, but they must possess a nonresident deer gun license (antlered, antlerless or combination) for each deer hunted and a fishing and hunting legacy permit, or proof of exemption. Holders of nonresident lifetime hunting and lifetime combination licenses are not exempt from purchasing deer licenses.

New this year, those ages 16-35 who have not completed a hunter education course can purchase an apprentice-designated hunting license and go deer hunting with an accompanying adult who is a licensed hunter age 21 or older and who possesses a certificate of hunter education. Persons 21 years old or older who are exempt from either hunter education or hunting license requirements may also accompany an apprentice hunter. Youths age 15 and under must successfully complete a hunter education course to hunt deer in Oklahoma.

Another new change for this year is that those hunting in northwest Oklahoma (Zone 2) will have an opportunity to take another antlerless deer. At least one antlerless deer must be taken in northwest Oklahoma (Zone 2) if hunters take their deer gun season limit of one antlered and two antlerless deer. Additionally, antlerless deer may only be harvested on specified days and in zones open to antlerless harvest. Antlerless zone boundaries as well as dates open to antlerless deer hunting can be viewed on page 17 of the current “Oklahoma Hunting Guide,” available at hunting license dealers, or on the Wildlife Department’s Web site at wildlifedepartment.com.

Upon successfully harvesting a deer, annual license holders must complete the Record of Game section of the universal license, and all license holders, including lifetime license holders, must immediately attach their name and license number to the carcass. What the hunter attaches can be anything, as long as it contains the hunter's name and hunting license number and remains securely attached to the animal until it is checked at a hunter check station or with an authorized Wildlife Department employee. All successful hunters must check their deer at the nearest hunter check station. A county-by-county listing of hunter check stations is provided in this year's Hunting Guide, and the most up-to-date check station listing is available at wildlifedepartment.com.

All deer gun hunters must conspicuously wear both a head covering and an outer garment above the waistline consisting of daylight fluorescent orange color totaling at least 400 square inches. Camo-fluorescent orange is legal as long as the total orange meets or exceeds the required 400 square inches.

Hunting hours during deer gun season are one-half hour before official sunrise to one-half hour after official sunset.

For additional regulations, antlerless zones, check station locations, season dates and a wealth of other information, be sure to pick up a copy of the “2007-08 Oklahoma Hunting Guide" available at all license dealer locations, or log on to the Department's Web site at wildlifedepartment

Pond Creek’s residents went to the polls Tuesday November 6th with a tax proposal passing overwhelmingly, 123 to 5, or 96.1 percent.

The proposal will extend the expiration date and modify the purpose of a 2 percent city excise tax. The tax now will extend to June 30, 2016.

"I am very proud of the citizens of Pond Creek for passing this intuitive and recognizing the need to keep our infrastructure in good repair.” said Larry Berg, Pond Creek, mayor.

“We have a great small town with an outstanding school and wonderful citizens. Our goal is to keep our cities electric, water, sewer and streets in good repair so we can prosper and we thank our citizens for helping us accomplish our goal.” Berg stated.

Pictured from right to left are Ruth Jackson, Mary Green, and Marilyn Betchan during the election Tuesday.

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Kilian will be honored on Thursday November 22nd with a family dinner at St. mary's Church hall in Medford to celebrate their 60th Wedding Anniversary. The couple has 39 grandchildren and 15 great grandchildren
DUI Charges Filed on Nash Women

Pond Creek Fire/EMS department responded to an early morning accident Nov. 9 three miles west of Lamont.

According to Trooper Patterson’s accident report, Holly Marie Ford, 36, Nash, was eastbound on US 60 when for an unknown reason applied her brakes. The vehicle went into a broad slide rolling her 2000 Chevrolet Blazer one and one half times. The Pond Creek Ambulance transported her to St Mary’s hospital.

According to the affidavit, when Trooper Patterson went to the hospital to talk to Ford concerning the accident he stated in court records that he could smell the strong odor of alcohol. According to the affidavit, Patterson asked Ford if she had had anything alcohol drinks during the time since the accident and Ford allegedly stated no, but allegedly stated she had had two drinks before the accident. A blood alcohol test was preformed at the hospital.

Ford was treated and released from St. Mary’s ER, at that time she was arrested by Trooper Patterson for driving under the influence of intoxicants. A citation was also written for driving in a manner not reasonable and proper.

Charges were filed on a Stillwater woman Nov 5 in Grant County district court after a Medford officer, Jeremy Biggs, stopped her for running the 4-way stop sign at Oklahoma 11 and US 81.

Kristin Nicole Kelly, 23, was charged with one-felony count of possession of controlled substance, and four misdemeanor charges of driving without a driver’s license, transporting opened container of beer, driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol, and unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia.

According to court records, several calls of an alleged drunk driver had been called into the Grant County sheriff’s office that a red Dodge Neon was westbound on Oklahoma 11 driving towards Medford, from hwy 74.

According to the affidavit, Officer Biggs allegedly observed the Dodge run the stop sign, when Biggs activated his emergency lights to conduct a traffic stop, the vehicle sped up to 50 mph. weaving all over the road, as stated in the affidavit.

Upon Biggs making contact with the driver, Kelly advised that she did not have her driver’s license with her. When checking the car the officer found; three hypodermic needles two laying in the back seat and one in Kelly‘s purse containing what tested positive for methamphetamine, A pipe with burned residue testing positive for Cannabis, an open container of beer, and a 200mg. pill of Seroquel, a prescription drug, was found in Kelly Bra by Reserve Deputy Latasha Jennnings at the time Kelly was being booked into the Grant County jail.

Supplemental information for after former conviction was also filed, stating that in Oct. 2002 in district court of Kingfisher county, Kelly was found guilty of possession of controlled dangerous substance.

According to the ODCR web site, Kelly also has outstanding warrants from Ottawa and Kay Counties.

A memorial service for Stella Irene Bullard will be 9:30 a.m. Saturday November 17th, 2007 in the First Christian Church Of Medford. Private inumment service will be later.
The city of Medford will host a Centennial Celebration from 2:00 to 3:30 Friday November 16th. Join the city for a piece of Centennial Cake.
Worn and tattered an commemoration of lives lost, this

Vietnam Army tank was donated and placed on the southeast side of the Grant County courtyard on June 27th, 1996 in honor of all Grant County veterans.

This year 2007 several Medford citizens are painting the Vietnam Army tank just in time for Veterans Day.

The tank was left in the custody of Ex-Vietnam Veteran, Gaylen Stover. Stover was in the service from 1967 to 1973.

Ollie Boyer, Gaylen Stover, Don Cink, Frankie Robbins, and two Grant County trustee inmates are removing old paint and repainting the Tank.

Ollie Boyer is pictured sanding old paint from the Tank

I'm No Trophy!

Picking your place to hunt big bucks this fall, solely on the basis of prospects for killing a trophy.

Myriad factors, many controlled by humans, determine whether a buck with the genetic potential to produce a trophy rack will get the nutrition needed to do so -- or will even live long enough to produce big antlers! The condition of the range, the minerals in the soil, the amount of hunting pressure (legal and otherwise!) and additional factors contribute to the production of trophy bucks and healthy deer populations in Oklahoma.

Many Sooner State hunters are happy just to find any kind of a deer-hunting spot. They hunt public lands or lands that may or may not have lots of deer.

Others put a little more work into finding good spots. They may have free access to Uncle Jim Bob’s 80 acres, but they’ll gladly spend hundreds of dollars for a different spot they think has more deer or has more potential for producing a wallhanger.

And then there are those who buy the really expensive leases -- properties where deer are aggressively protected and managed. Some hunters purchase guided hunts, or just buy land and manage it to grow trophies for themselves.

For most hunters, it’s a crapshoot. Unless you have lots of cash to spend, you aren’t likely to get a hunting spot that has lots of trophy bucks wandering around.

Fortunately for those in an average tax brackets, a trophy buck can stroll through just about any property anywhere in the state nowadays -- at any rate, that’s what the Cy Curtis list seems to indicate: As long as you’re in a spot in Oklahoma where you’re seeing deer, there’s a chance you’ll see a good one if you hold out long enough.

Picture By Dale Hibler, Medford

REGULAR MEETING AGENDA

MEDFORD BOARD OF EDUCATION

Monday, November 12, 2007

7:00 P.M. Teachers Lounge

301 N. Main

Medford, Oklahoma 73759

Posted this 9 day of November, 2007, at 3:55 p.m. at the main office entrance, cafeteria doors and workroom to the Medford School Building and the school website.

Posted by Gloria Gonzales. Deputy Clerk

(NOTE: The Medford Board of Education may discus, vote to approve, vote to disapprove, vote to table or decide not to vote on any item on this agenda)

1. Call to order and recording of members present and absent to establish a quorum.

2. Consent Agenda:

All of the following items, which concern reports and items of a routine nature normally approved at a board meeting, will be approved by one board vote, unless any board member desires to have a separate vote on any or all of these items. The consent agenda consists of the discussion, consideration, and approval of the following items:

A. The corrections of minutes from the October 8, 2007 regular meeting.

B. Approval of monthly financial reports ending November 9, 2007.

a. Treasurer’s report and investment report.

b. Encumbrance and warrant registers in the general and building funds.

c. School activity fund monthly summary.

C. Transfer of funds within the activity fund account.

i. $300.00 from concessions to the junior class.

3. Consideration and vote to adopt a resolution from the Medford Board of Education call for an election to be submitted to the voters of the district. An election shall be held to elect a board member for office number three (3), on the first Tuesday in February, that being February 5, 2008 with a run-off election to be held on the first Tuesday in April, that being April 1, 2008 if no candidate for the board member position receives more than 50% of the vote. The polling places shall be open from 7:00 a.m. to 7 p.m.

4. Discussion, motion, and possible action to close or not to close precincts 270015 (Jefferson) and 270026 (Lamont) if a board member runoff election is necessary.

5. Discussion, motion, and possible action to approve or not to approve the proposed 2008 school board meeting dates.

6. Discussion, motion, and possible action to name the superintendent as the voting delegate to the Oklahoma School Assurance Group.

7. Teacher report

8. Principal’s report

9. Superintendent’s report

American Education Week

Sign at the football field

Pickup Update

10. New business - Items that could not have been foreseen or known about at the time agenda was posted which need action.

11. Vote to adjourn

Byron Berline Band Concert

Ponca City Arts and Humanities Council will host the Byron Berline Band in concert on Thursday, Nov. 15, at Poncan Theatre at 7:30 p.m.

This group from Guthrie will play a variety of Oklahoma songs as our salute to the Centennial.

The Byron Berline Band is a bluegrass and western swing band led by three-time national champion fiddler Byron Berline, who has been inducted into the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame. Berline has recorded seven solo albums including his highly acclaimed "Fiddle and a Song." In 1996, the album was nominated for two Grammy awards, Best Album of the Year and Best Song of the Year.

The performance is free to the public; no tickets are necessary to attend.

For the first time, the Oklahoma Blood Institute, from Ponca City, held a blood drive in Medford Tuesday October 30th. The Medford area is now considered part of the Ponca City Oklahoma Blood Institute district.

The blood collected during the blood drive was in the name of Bernadine Frazier, Medford resident, who has recently been diagnosed with Cancer and is receiving blood.

The drive collected a total 54 units, 34 whole blood, 2 platelets, 5 RBCP which equals 10 units, 4 RBC which equals 8 units. There were 9 deferrals.

Carol Beggs won the $50.00 Bond, which was a donation from the Grant County Bank for the Blood Drive.

Volunteers for the blood drive were Jeannette Loch, Evelyn Truhlar, Jeanne Boyd, Effie Misak, Mildred Mitchell, Sheryl Brittain, and France Mark.

Food was donated by the Busy Moms Club and the 4-H group.

Mildred Mitchell received a green plant and pin from the Northwest Oklahoma Blood Institute, Enid, for 100 hours of volunteer work for 2006. Medford volunteers missed the appreciation dinner Tuesday because of the blood drive being held on the same day as the Dinner.

Pictured number one;

Neil Jones (left) and Dale Frazier (right) are pictured giving blood during Medford's blood drive. Dale is the husband of Bernadine Frazier who the drive was being held for.

The Grant County Farm Bureau Women’s Committee held the second citizenship seminar this time for all Grant county seniors.

“The first mock trial we held earlier this year was for Grant county 8th graders. It was such a successes, we were asked to do the second one for all the seniors in Grant county.” said Margaret Watsek, committee chairman.

The mock trial was a case of B.B. Wolf; also know as Big Bad Wolf, versus Curly Pig. The charge against Curly Pig was attempted Wolf cooking.

The attorney for B.B, Wolf stated in opening statements that “we will show that last August 19, the defendant, Mr. Pig, did indeed attempt to cook the plaintiff. We will show that he placed a steaming cauldron of boiling water in a spot where he was sure Mr. Wolf would show up, and that furthermore, his cookbook was found open to the recipe for Poached Wolf.”

Attorney for Curly Pig stated in his opening statement “Mr. Wolf's charge is ridiculous. We will show that the cauldron was inside Mr. Pig's home--a home Mr. Wolf was trying to forcibly enter. We will also show that Mr. Wolf's actions were just the latest in a long series of harassment of the Pig family --harassment that the attorney argue, included the eating of Mr. Pig's two brothers, Larry and Hoe. We will show that Curly Pig was merely protecting his home and life.”

In closing statements, the attorney for B.B. Wolf stated,” Your honor, we have shown that Mr. Pig did, on several occasions, taunt and tease Mr. Wolf, that he did lift the lid on the cauldron just as Mr. Wolf was coming down the chimney to pay him a visit, and that his cookbook and let the fact speak for itself -- was open to the recipe for Poached Wolf. I'm sure the jury agrees that he was attempting to do harm to Mr. Wolf.”

In closing statements, Mr. Curly Pig attorney argued, “Your honor, we have shown that Mr. Wolf had it in for the Pig family. Clearly, he was up to no good any of the times he came over to Curly Pig's house. Mr. Pig is a law-abiding citizen who was minding his own business when Mr. Wolf began harassing him. If he teased Wolf, well, he 'certainly was egged on to it. I'm sure the jury will agree that his lifting the lid off the kettle and his cookbook opening to the wolf recipe just as Mr. Wolf came down the chimney were mere coincidences. He did not mean any real harm to come to Mr. Wolf.

In Judge Jack Hammontree instruction to the Jury he stated, “You now have heard the evidence. Now it is your job to decide whether Mr. Pig was trying to poach Mr. Wolf. Will you please go with the Bailiff to the jury room and after you have decided, would you please come back and inform the Court whether Curly Pig was trying to do in Mr. B.B. Wolf by lifting the lid off the cauldron of boiling water just as Mr. Wolf was coming down his chimney?

A jury of 12 members compiled of members from the senior classes of Grant County found in favor of the defendant Mr. Curly Pig, finding Mr. Pig not guilty of trying to do B.B, Wolf in. by steaming him in a cauldron of boiling water

Picture Number Three;

Grant County Court Clerk, Deana Kilian is pictured reading the "Not Guilty" verity during the mock trial of B.B. Wolf -V- Curly Pig

Dedication of the Centennial bench in loving memory of Dorothy Simons, long time Grant County resident and Educator was held Friday morning.

Craig Vanderburgh, and Dorothy’s son Myron Simons, rememberd Dorothy as a very dedicated teacher and someone who loved reading, who was an almost daily visitor to Medford’s Library.

Cindy Pratt sang Amazing Grace and led the attending audience in the song Oklahoma.

Pictured from right to left;

Owen Sanders and mother Brenda Sanders. Marilyn Pulls, Myron and Julie Simons. Family of Dorothy Simons.

A second Oklahoma Centennial Bench in Medford located at the corner of hwy 81 and East Cherokee Ave. was dedicated Monday Nov. 5th, 2007. The bench was purchased by the Chamber.

The Centennial Clock which stands on the same corner was dedicated January 31, 2007 on a snowy winter’s day.

Carol and Merble Bellin celebrate their 60th Wedding Anniversary.

The children and Grandchildren of Merble and Carol are hosting a reception from 2 to 4 p.m. on Nov. 24th at the Deer Creek Mennonite Church. All relatives and friends are invited.

Flu Shots are available at the Grant County Health Dept. at 115 North Main in Medford. Please call for appointment at 580-395-2906
The First Christian Church of Medford invites everyone to join in on an evening caroling, beginning at 7 p.m. Dec. 2nd in the warmth of the church facility at 123 West Pawnee St… hot coffee, apple cider and cookies will be served in the fellowship hall immediately following the gathering.
In 1957 a Perry Oklahoma funeral home operator, Bill Parker, watched an Oklahoma City eye doctor remove bandages from a 22-year-old mother who had never seen her husband or young child. The woman had received a corneal transplant, an operation to repair the damaged front portion of her eye. According to Bill, “When the doctor removed the bandages, he didn’t need to ask her if she could see. You could tell by her expression when she looked at her family.”

Bill, a member of the Oklahoma Perry Lions Club convinced club members to start an effort to stamp out impaired vision caused by eye disease. The club launched a drive to work with Lions across the state to establish the Oklahoma Lions Eye Bank in 1957.

The mission of the Oklahoma Lions Eye Bank (OLEB) is to (1) provide cornea tissue of the highest quality for cornea transplant (2) strictly comply with Medical Standards and FDA guidelines for the recovery, evaluation and distribution of tissue (3) educate and encourage Oklahomans about the need for organ, eye and tissue donation.

Medford Lions Club meets the first and third Tuesday of each month at 6:30

4-H Share-the-Fun

Grant County 4-H Share-the-Fun will be Sunday, November 18th, 2 p.m., at the Pond Creek-Hunter School Auditorium in Pond Creek. The public is invited to attend.

There will be three categories; individual, small group and large group 4-Hers may participate in each category.

Share the Fun is a talent sharing activity that helps 4-Hers develop poise, confidence, leadership capabilities, cooperative attitudes, and demonstrate talents while providing opportunities for wholesome recreation and “sharing fun”.

The Northwest District 4-H Share-the-Fun will be held Saturday, December 1, at the Fairview Public School in Fairview, Oklahoma. Representatives from Grant County will be selected at our county Share the Fun to perform at the district level.

For more information contact the Grant County OSU Cooperative Extension Office at 580-395-2134.

Mesonet Statistical Data for Medford, Oklahoma.

These values represent statistics for the day in progress.

They do NOT represent final daily values.

Statistical data for Medford: November 6, 2007 ( since midnight CST)

Class Parameter Value Time (CST)

Air Temperature Maximum Temperature 36 F 12:05 am

Minimum Temperature 30 F 3:00 am

Average Temperature 33 F

Dewpoint Temperature Maximum Dewpoint Temperature 27 F 1:15 am

Minimum Dewpoint Temperature 24 F 3:00 am

Average Dewpoint Temperature 26 F

Relative Humidity Maximum Relative Humidity 82 % 3:10 am

Minimum Relative Humidity 66 % 12:30 am

Average Relative Humidity 73 %

10 cm Soil Temperature (sod) Maximum TS10 Soil Temperature 52 F 12:15 am

Minimum TS10 Soil Temperature 51 F 3:15 am

Average TS10 Soil Temperature 51 F

10 cm Soil Temperature (bare) Maximum TB10 Soil Temperature 53 F 12:15 am

Minimum TB10 Soil Temperature 50 F 3:15 am

Average TB10 Soil Temperature 51 F

Barometric Pressure Maximum Barometric Pressure 29.26 in 2:15 am

Minimum Barometric Pressure 29.24 in 12:05 am

Average Barometric Pressure 29.25 in

Wind Speed Maximum Wind Speed 11 mph 1:15 am

Average Wind Speed 6 mph

Wind Direction Prevailing Wind Direction NNW (54%)

Secondary Wind Direction NW ( 8%)

Rainfall Rainfall 0.00 in

Solar Radiation Maximum Solar Radiation 0 W/m2 12:05 am

Total Solar Radiation 0.0 MJ/m2

Grant County District 2 recently received 30 Rocky Mountain juniper trees through the William S. Key Tree Grow-Out Project. Oklahoma area forester Dan Stidham and Wheatland Resource Conservation and Development Association coordinator Carl Smith delivered the trees to the Grant County District 2 shop in Medford.

“District 2 employees utilized the juniper trees to create a windbreak north of the county building,” said District 2 commissioner Cindy Bobbitt. “This windbreak will help to save energy and reduce heating and cooling costs for our building by protecting the building from winter winds.”

Bobbitt said studies have shown reducing cold air infiltration can reduce winter heating costs by 20 to 40 percent. In addition, she said trees aid summer cooling through the evaporation of water from tree leaves, which directly cools the air around a building.

The William S. Key Tree Grow-Out Project began in 2003, when Wheatland partnered with the William S. Key Correctional Facility in Ft. Supply, Okla. Smith said Wheatland first purchased several thousand seedlings using funding from a National Tree Trust grant. Inmates then planted the seedlings in the three-gallon containers, and the containers were placed in the ground in rows with ample spacing to allow for safe growth of strong, viable root systems.

Larry Irvin is shown baiting a hook at the First United Methodist Church Halloween fishing pond for a group of young fisherman. During the Halloween Night at the Medford Civic Center.
See if you can recognize who is in the picture.
PERSONAL INJURY COLLISION OCCURRED AT 1747 HOURS 11/01/2007, 1/2 MILE

NORTH

OF

FAIRVIEW ON US60 IN MAJOR COUNTY.

VEHICLE ONE - 1976 GMC WHEAT TRUCK DRIVEN BY WILLIS BRETT REESE, WM, 48

YOA,

ADDRESS FAIRVIEW OKLAHOMA. NOT INJURED

VEHICLE TWO - 2001 HONDA 4D DRIVEN BY SAMMIE CHARLENE JESTER, WF, 58

YOA,

ADDRESS FAIRVIEW. TRANSPORTED BY MAJOR COUNTY EMS TO FAIRVIEW

HOSPITAL.

ADMITTED IN GOOD CONDITION WITH INTERNAL TRUNK AND LEG INJURIES.

WHAT HAPPENED: VEHICLE ONE WAS SOUTH BOUND US60, ATTEMPTING TO MAKE

LEFT

TURN ON COUNTY ROAD. VEHICLE TWO WAS SOUTH BOUND ON US60 PASSING

ANOTHER

VEHICLE AND STRUCK VEHICLE ONE AT LEFT REAR WHEEL.

Furneral services for Betty Dirksen, 81, Medford, was held Monday October 29th in the First United Methodist Church of Medford.
Leroy Reed is 90 and writes in a Thank You Note. "Thank you so very much for the birthday cards and letters. At 90 it is especially comforting to be remembered by old friends and acquaintances. Though I miss my Medford days, I am content in my new home. God bless you for your knindess.
Wakita's annual Turkey Dinner will be this Sunday November 4th from 11:30 to 1:30 at the Wakita Catholic Hall.
The Anvil Auto Repair, owners Larry and Debra Cless will be closing on Mondays and Fridays to p ursue their tree cutting business. They will be taking appointments for Tuesdays Wednesdays and Thursdays.
Debbie (Crites) Hayward is compiling a special memories book for her mon, Mary Ann Crites. a ling time Caldwell, Kansas and Medford, Oklahoma resident. She is asking your contritution to help in making the book. please send any story and or photograph to Debbie hayward 446253 E. Hwy 10 Welch, Oklahoma 74369. Deadline is Nov 15th, 2007
Medford Chamber meeting will be held Monday Nov. 5th at noon the the Coummunity Rooms. Bring your own lunch.
Mesonet Statistical Data for Medford, Oklahoma.

These values represent statistics for the day in progress.

They do NOT represent final daily values.

Statistical data for Medford: October 31, 2007 ( since 1:00 am CDT)

Class Parameter Value Time (CDT)

Air Temperature Maximum Temperature 62 F 2:55 pm

Minimum Temperature 50 F 8:10 am

Average Temperature 56 F

Dewpoint Temperature Maximum Dewpoint Temperature 50 F 9:25 am

Minimum Dewpoint Temperature 34 F 3:20 pm

Average Dewpoint Temperature 45 F

Relative Humidity Maximum Relative Humidity 90 % 9:00 am

Minimum Relative Humidity 36 % 3:20 pm

Average Relative Humidity 68 %

10 cm Soil Temperature (sod) Maximum TS10 Soil Temperature 58 F 1:15 am

Minimum TS10 Soil Temperature 56 F 9:30 am

Average TS10 Soil Temperature 57 F

10 cm Soil Temperature (bare) Maximum TB10 Soil Temperature 61 F 3:15 pm

Minimum TB10 Soil Temperature 55 F 9:30 am

Average TB10 Soil Temperature 57 F

Barometric Pressure Maximum Barometric Pressure 29.03 in 1:35 pm

Minimum Barometric Pressure 28.75 in 5:00 am

Average Barometric Pressure 28.88 in

Wind Speed Maximum Wind Speed 42 mph 11:00 am

Average Wind Speed 15 mph

Wind Direction Prevailing Wind Direction SSE (41%)

Secondary Wind Direction NNE (20%)

Rainfall Rainfall 0.00 in

Solar Radiation Maximum Solar Radiation 669 W/m2 12:55 pm

Total Solar Radiation 10.8 MJ/m2

The Medford Busy Moms met at the home of Jeanne Boyd in Thursday October 11 at 7:30 p.m.

Traci Hancock presented their new year books. Other business was completing plans for the Senior Christmas Dinner, and state Convention in OKC.

Hostess Jeanne Boyd and C0-hostess Sheryl Brittain served refreshments to Frances mark, Judy Juhl, Olga Krechmar, Betty Reimer, Deloris Boyer, Sheila Shepherd, Florence Kline, Traci Hancock, and Wilma Hajek. Deoloris Boyer won the door prize.

The City of Medford has begun a $255,000 crack seal and overlay project at the Medford Municipal Airport. The project is being funded 95% with money from the Federal Aviation Administration and 5% City funds. The airport was closed Wednesday, October 17th and will remain closed for approximately sixty days. Evans and Associates is the contractor and Myers Engineering is the engineering firm.

Cracks will be sealed on the runway, apron, and taxiway. Then all of these areas will be overlaid with 2" asphalt.

“The City of Medford works closely with the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission and the FAA to keep funding coming for these critical airport projects.” said Medford City Manager Dea Kretchmar.

The Medford airport is the only paved runway of sufficient length in Grant County and it is used by pipeline inspectors, aerial applicators and hobby pilots year round.

‘The economic impact of having an airport in our area is tremendous and we must do all we can to preserve small airports in Grant County. ’Kretchmar stated.

Last year the pilot's lounge and restroom was rebuilt and the year before the hangar was renovated that hold's area pilot's planes. Other improvements made to the airport in the past few years was the addition of two new taxiways and asphalting the area north of the east hangar.

“More projects will be planned for 2009 as the Capital Improvement Plan is reviewed by the Medford Aviation Board.’ said Kretchmar.

Larry Don Dewey, Charles Nipper and Dan Wilson are the current airport board members.

We grow them BIG in Medford. This gigantic tomato plant is located in the backyard of Lloyd Schmitz. Lloyd said the last time he measured the plant it was over 10 feet wide and was still growing.

“I can’t tell you how many ripe tomatoes I have already picked but it has been buckets full…“said Lloyd. “The plant is still producing and flowering.

He said the only thing he did when he planted the plant was put fertilizer. Sticks around the plant

For the second time this year the sign over the south entrance to the Medford Cardinal Field has been knocked down by service trucks to tall to pass under it.

Mid-day Wednesday Oct. 24 a US Foodservice semi truck driver from Edmond made a wrong turn missing the school cafeteria. In trying to correct his mistake, he just created another problem by hooking the sign when trying to exit the field.

Gonzales Construction was able to use a forklift to raise the sign off the truck so the truck could back from under the sign, saving further damage to the new sign.

The sign received paint and dent damage in the accident.

The 1st Baptist Church Celebrated 110 year Anniversary

On Sunday October 28th 2007 observed the 110 year for the 1st Baptist Church in Medford.

Past pastors Jeff Jackson and Bob Smith were speakers as were Velma Lee Moss, and DeLawrence Hamilton, Marilyn Wirtz was the pianist and Jimmy Hagerman led the music. The special music was a tape of the late Danny Kennedy singing, as he was the song leader of the church for many years. Trish Sterling showed a wonderful presentations of Pictures from the past to the present. At the end of the services Homer Holden, Junior Nachtigall and Jimmy Hageman shared some remembrances. The church building was open in the afternoon for visiting and seeing changes made in the last few years. A brisket meal was served after the services.

The Medford Public Library will be dedication the Centennial Bench in front of the Library as well as hosting an Open House for the Library this Friday November 2, 2007, at 10:00 a.m…

The Centennial bench is in memory of Dorothy Simons, longtime Library patron and Grant County teacher. Cindy Pratt will do a solo of “Amazing Grace” as well as leading the audience in a rendition of “Oklahoma”. Library Board Member Rev. Craig VanDeburgh, will speak honoring both Dorothy and the Oklahoma Centennial.

Refreshments will be served.

A felony charge, and arrest warrant for Distribution of Controlled Substance, was filed in Grant county district court on a Medford resident Monday, Oct 29th after a probable cause affidavit stated that, Darrell Hintz allegedly sold “4 joints" of Marijuana at the price of $5.00, to Michael W. Smith, Pond Creek, and while allegedly at the residents of Tex Richardson in Pond Creek on October 15th

Drug felony and misdemeanor charges against Richardson and Smith were also filed last week in Grant County court. Tim Barwick, Pond Creek Marshal, was the arresting officer

Trick or Treat Set for Wednesday

Medford's official "Trick or Treat" night is Wednesday, according to information from the City of Medford. Participants are urged to follow safety rules, and drivers are cautioned to drive carefully

War Against The Flu Virus

Grant County area citizens were enthusiastic about being protected from the 2007 flu virus. A large group gather Monday morning at the Medford Civic Center to receive their flu shots. Jack Belmar, rural Renfrow, is shown with Paula Pitcher, Grant County Health department

US64 1 EASR OF WOODS-HARPER COUNTY LINE HAS\D ONE LANE

CLOSED DUE TO A PICKUP PULLING A 5TH WHEEL TRAVEL TRAILER

THAT HAD OVERTURNED.

WRECKERS SHOULD BE ON THE SCENE SHORTLY TO ASSIST

IN OPENING THE REMAINING LANE

Fire Departments to Receive Grants

Northern Oklahoma Development Authority (NODA) will award grants November 1, 2007 at 6 pm at the Watonga Fire Dept. for Kingfisher, Blaine, and Major counties fire dept and November 3 at 10 am at the Medford Fire Dept. many of the State Legislators will be there to present the grants and the fire Departments can thank them in person for all their hard work.

Each Department will receive an Operation grant of $5,100. This money is used to help the expense of running the Fire Department such as utilities insurance, fuel , maintenance and upkeep of equipment. With the heavy wild land fires this past year fuel costs take a very big part of this.

The State Legislators appropriated $2.5 million for revolving fund truck purchase this year; Oklahoma Agriculture Food and Forestry Division was able to purchase 120 trucks. NODA will be allotted 10 trucks for our District. Last year the legislature was able to fund $5 million for this purpose and Noda received 20 trucks. Department that received trucks last year were - ALFALFA Co.- Aline, Burlington, Cherokee, Goltry: Blaine Co. - Canton, Hitchcock Fire Dept., Watonga; Grant Co.- Hawley, Nash Fire Dept., Medford, Manchester Fire Dept: Kay Co.- Braman, Kaw City, Newkirk, Ranch Drive, River Road; Kingfisher Co. - Dover, Kingfisher, Omega; Noble Co.- Billings, Sumner; Major Co. - Cleo Springs, Ringwood. We will announce this years Truck awards at the meetings.

The 80/20 grants will be used to build new stations or to improve or relocate their current station and for the purchase of needed equipment. Larry Schafnitt, Rural Fire Defense Coordinator for NODA, stated, “ NODA received about 40 grant applications this year and all of them were worthwhile projects. The departments were all deserving, I wish we had the money available to fund all of them. The State Legislators and officials work very hard to get us the funds we receive and we all owe them our appreciation for the efforts they make in our behalf, “ Schafnitt said.

The grants are 80/20 competitive matching fire grant, 80% state funds, matched by 20% local funds. These funds are available for fire stations and improvements up to $20,000 or for the purchases of equipment up to $8,000. The applications are judged using predetermined criteria that measures need for and merit of the proposed project.

Myers Minutes

Legislative

Session Will

Start Soon

By DAVID MYERS State Senate District 20

I hope everyone is enjoying the great fall weather we've had recently. Just as our students are busy in the classrooms, we've been busy with our interim studies. If you'd like to learn about these, you can visit our Web site at www.oksenate.gov.

It's hard to believe but session will be starting soon, so we're working to find what the most pressing issues are for our state so we can address them next year. The deadline for requesting bills is Friday, Dec. 7. If you have any ideas for bills please don't hesitate to call or email me. Your input is imperative to the work I do at the Capitol.

I wanted to let you know that nearly 150 new laws will be going into effect on Thursday, Nov. 1. I'd like to briefly go over some of those this week and will do more in the future.

Probably the one bill that is on the forefront of many citizens and business owners' minds is HB 1804, otherwise known as the Oklahoma Taxpayer and Citizen Protection Act of 2007. This new law will prevent illegal immigrants from taking advantage of taxpayer-funded services except in cases such as a medical emergencies or natural disasters. Our law mirrors federal law on transporting and hiding illegal immigrants. This will give our state law enforcement officers the authority to take action in such cases.

Under the new law, if an employer releases a U.S. citizen while retaining an illegal immigrant, the citizen can file a discriminatory practice claim and seek to have both his job and back wages restored. In addition, businesses contracting with state agencies that don't use an online program to verify the immigration status of employees will forfeit the ability to do business with the state. Businesses acting in good faith to verify status will be protected against liability.

Finally, children of immigrants who have lived in the U.S. for at least two years and graduated from an Oklahoma high school will still be eligible for in-state college tuition under the law, but those students must be taking the necessary steps for becoming citizens. The new law doesn't pertain to students currently in college.

Another important bill is HB 1816 which sets a minimum imprisonment of 25 years for the crime of sexual assault against a child 12 years of age or younger. It was imperative to get this bill passed because so many of these people commit the same types of crimes once they get out of prison, so this will keep these monsters behind bars longer so that they can't hurt other children.

Landowners HB 1915 was passed for you. It will require individuals to get permission from private landowners before going onto their property to hunt or fish. There is a growing problem in our state of people going onto other people's property and tearing down fences, leaving trash and shooting farm equipment as well as live stock. This new law will help protect the rights of land owners.

HB 1927 is another law that will help provide further protections to our children and other victims.

This law will require that local court-appointed special advocate programs have the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation conduct criminal history records searches on all individuals applying to become court-appointed special advocate volunteers or employees of the programs. If the prospective volunteer or employee has lived in the state for less than one year, the criminal history records will be obtained from the previous state of residence. This will help ensure greater protection for our children and others who depend on these programs.

Finally, HB 2104 will allow residents and non-residents 17 years of age and younger to get into participating sites affiliated with the Oklahoma Historical Society one day a week for free. This is a tremendous bill that will help our local schools, as well as families, financially by allowing them to give students a unique learning experience outside the classroom.

To contact me at the Capitol, please write to Senator David Myers, State Capitol, 2300 N. Lincoln Blvd. Room 414, Oklahoma City, Okla., 73105, or call (405) 521-5628.

Two Pond Creek Men Arrested on Drug Charges

wo Pond Creek residents were charged with felony and misdemeanor counts in Grant County District court October 19.

Michael Wayne Smith, 47, was charge with one felony count of possession of controlled substance within 1000 Ft. of a school or park.

Tex Danny Richardson, 52, was charged with a misdemeanor count of unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia and one felony count of possession of controlled substance within 1000 Ft. of a school or park. A petition to revoke a suspended sentence was also filed on Richardson for a 2004 similar felony charge of possession of a controlled substance.

According to court records, on Oct. 16, Pond Creek Marshal Tim Barwick was called to the Pond Creek grocery store when a small baggy with a green leafy substance was found on the floor next to the store’s check out counter.

According to the store clerk, a man he thought to be living with Tex Richardson was checking out when he first saw the baggy in the man’s pocket. Later the clerk found the baggy lying on the floor next to the check out counter.

Barwick according to court records, went to the home of Tex Richardson where he found Smith.

According to the affidavit, Smith allegedly stated that he was at the grocery store just a little earlier, but he did not know that he dropped the baggy of Marijuana.

According to the affidavit, Smith allegedly stated that the Marijuana was his, and that he was on probation.

According to the affidavit, the grocery store and Richardson’s residents is within 1000 Ft. of a school and park.

Smith also allegedly stated that he bought the Marijuana “about four joints” while at Richardson’s residence from another person.

According the probable cause affidavit filed against Richardson, Barwick went to Richardson’s residents. Richardson allegedly stated that in the drawer of the end table was a pipe, tray, and Marijuana, but they were not his. The pipe contained residue and unburned Marijuana, which tested positive.

Richardson allegedly confessed to Barwick to having possession of the Marijuana, marijuana pipe and tray as stated in the affidavit.

The Grant County Health Department flu shot clinic will be Monday October 29th from 9-6, at the Medford Civic Center. Those at highest risk of complications from influenza will be giving from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The general public will open from 1p.m. to 6 p.m. or whil supply lasts.
4-H Record Book Workshop

Grant County 4-H’ers are encouraged to attend a 4-H Record Book Workshop on Monday October 29 at 6:30 pm in the Grant County OSU Cooperative Extension Office, 112 E. Guthrie Room 301 Courthouse Medford, Oklahoma 73759-1246.

Pizza will be served. If you plan to attend, please contact the extension office before 4:00pm Friday October 26 by calling 580-395-2134 or emailing beth.m.peters@okstate.edu.

Reserve Officer Returns as Grant County Deputy

A former Grant County Sheriff office dispatcher and Reserve officer returned this month as Grant County’s newest deputy.

Mike Payne is filling the deputy position left vacant when Jeremy Biggs returned to the Medford police force.

Payne graduated from Cloves, New Mexico in 1991. Worked for the Oklahoma Department of Transportation from 1999 to January 0f 2007.

“Being involved in law-enforcement part-time led me to realize I wanted to make a career change, so in February of this year I was hired by the city of Hobart and finished CLEET September 0f 2007. I am very excited about living back in Medford,” said Payne. “I am looking forward to serving the citizens of Grant County. Grant County is a great place to live.”

Bread Machine Hot Rolls

Place in bread machine in this order:

1 cup Milk or Water

1/2 cup Granulated Sugar

1 beaten Egg

3/4 teaspoon Salt

3-1/2 cups All-purpose Flour

Make a well and place the yeast:

1 package Yeast

(2 teaspoons)

2 tablespoons Butter

(divided into 4 pieces)

Place a piece of butter over the flour in each corner.

Set the bread machine to mix and knead on Dough setting. When kneading has finished, remove dough and form into doorknob-size balls and place in a well buttered pan; let rise 1-1/2 hours until double in size while lightly covered with a linen towel.

Bake at 375 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes or until golden brown.

Medford- 6 Pond Creek- 41 Medford- 29 Deer Creek- Lamont-18

Medford- 52 Kremlin- 6 Medford- x Shidler- x

Medford- 68 South West Covenant- 32 Medford- x Ringwood- x

Medford- 35 Waynoka- 42 Medford- x So. Coffeyville- x

Medford- 63 Coyle- 20 Medford- x Covington- x

National Fire Prevention Week, October 7 - 13, 2007

Practice Your Escape Plan!" is the theme of Fire Prevention Week 2007. “It is not enough to have a home fire escape plan to escape safely; you have to make sure that everyone in the home has practiced the plan.” stated National Fire officials. The majority of Americans have a fire escape plan, but most have not taken time to have a practiced drill in their homee.

“In promoting fire safety, we should practice fire safety all year long.’ stated Medford Assistant fire Chief Tom Woodson. “ Many potential fire hazards go undetected because people simply do not take steps to fireproof their home. ”said woodson.

Many bedroom fires are caused by misuse or poor maintenance of electrical devices, careless use of candles, smoking in bed, and children playing with matches and lighters. Most potential hazards can be addressed with a little common sense. For example, be sure to keep flammable items like bedding, clothes and curtains at least three feet away from portable heaters or lit candles, and never smoke in bed. In addition, items like appliances or electric blankets should not be operated if they have frayed power cords, and electrical outlets should never be overloaded.

Fire Safety Checklist:

Install and maintain a working smoke alarm outside of every sleep area and remember to change the battery at least once a year.

Designate two escape routes from each bedroom and practice them regularly.

Teach everyone the "Stop, Drop, and Roll" technique in case clothing catches on fire.

Avoid storing old mattresses in the home or garage.

Teach kids that matches, lighters and candles are tools, not toys.

Medford Assistant Fire Chief Tom Woodson pictured(suited in fire gear) and firefighter Mike Glenn held a demonstration for Medford elementary student Tuesday morning. Medford’s firefighters showed student how a firefighter might look in case a young student should have to be rescued from a burning building.

Medford Community Blood Drive

Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2007

12:00 to 7:00 pm. at Civic Center

Bring Photo ID

The City of Medford received a 2007 Municipal Innovations Award for it’s "Welcome to Medford” DVD, which features images of Medford's recreation areas, businesses and churches.

The award winners were announced during the Oklahoma Municipal League’s awards breakfast in Tulsa September 13.

Medford City manager Dea Kretchmar took the pictures for the DVD and the presentation was by Becca Bush, daughter of Harvey and Barbara Bush of Medford.

Pictured is Dea Kretchmar, Medford City manager, (left) and Barbara Bush, Medford City Clerk/Treasurer. (right)

There are four "Hunter Check Stations' located in Grant County

Lamont---- G&S Geranal Store

Medford---- Pioneer Trading Co.

Nash--- Jiffy Trip

Pond Creek-----Bob;s Easy Shop

DEER SEASONS: The archery deer season runs from Oct 1 through Jan 15.

The muzzleloading season opens on the fourth Saturday in October

and runs for nine days. The deer gun season opens the Saturday before Thanksgiving

and runs for 16 days.

ARCHERY: Oct. 1 - 2007-Jan. 15, 2008 ( Jan. 1-15, 2008, Antlerless only )

MUZZLELOADING: Oct. 27 - Nov. 4, 2007 (Antlerless days vary by zone)

GUN: Nov. 17 - Dec. 2, 2007 (Antlerless days vary by zone)

YOUTH DEER GUN: Oct. 19-21; statewide

SPECIAL ANTLERLESS SEASON: Dec. 21-23 & Dec. 28-30 (Open only in certain zones

QUAIL: Nov. 10, 2007 - Feb. 15, 2008; statewide (second Sat in November thru Feb 15.)

PHEASANT: Only designated areas (see Oklahoma Hunting Guide for counties)-

Dec. 1, 2007 - Jan. 31, 2008

A Hunters Education class was held Saturday Oct. 6th at the Medford Civic Center.

It is strongly recommended that anyone who plans on hunting or shooting complete a hunter education class and required by Oklahoma law the only Exemptions from Hunter Education course Is persons 36 years of age or older. Honorably discharged from the United States Armed Forces. Currently on active duty in the United States Armed Forces, or a Member of the National Guard.

Hunter education covers a variety of topics including firearms safety, wildlife identification, wildlife conservation and management, survival, archery, muzzle loading and hunter responsibility. The course is available as a standard eight-hour course, the internet home study course and the workbook home study course.

Over the past 30 years, hunting related accidents and fatalities have declined by more than 70 percent in Oklahoma. Officials with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC) say mandatory hunter education courses have not only reduced accidents within Oklahoma, but also in every state and Canadian province with similar programs.

82 attended the course Saturday.

Anyone having a question about game laws, or concerns can e-mail their inquiries to askwarden@odwc.state.ok.us

Picture one: Ronnie Pratt and son Cole and Garrett Misak are pictured Saturday during the Hunter Education class being conducted by Grant County Game Rangers, Nick Woodard and Marshal Reigh.

REGULAR MEETING AGENDA

MEDFORD BOARD OF EDUCATION

Monday, October 8, 2007

7:00 P.M. Teachers Lounge

301 N. Main

Medford, Oklahoma 73759

Posted this 5th day of October, 2007, at 3:35 p.m. at the main office entrance, cafeteria doors and workroom to the Medford School Building and the school website.

Posted by Gloria Gonzales. Deputy Clerk

(NOTE: The Medford Board of Education may discuss, vote to approve, vote to disapprove, vote to table or decide not to vote on any item on this agenda.)

1. Call to order and recording of members present and absent to establish a quorum.

2. Consent Agenda:

All of the following items, which concern reports and items of a routine nature normally approved at a board meeting, will be approved by one board vote, unless any board member desires to have a separate vote on any or all of these items. The consent agenda consists of the discussion, consideration, and approval of the following items:

A. The corrections of minutes from the September 10, 2007 regular meeting.

B. Approval of monthly financial reports ending October 5, 2007.

1. Treasurer’s report and investment report.

2. Encumbrance and warrant registers in the general and building funds.

3. School activity fund monthly summary.

3. Teacher report

4. Principals Report

5. Superintendent report

A. OSSBA District 3 meeting

B. Accreditation reports

6. Discussion, motion, and possible action to approve or not to approve the estimate of needs for 2007-2008.

7. Public hearing regarding proposed operational budget for 2007-2008.

8. Discussion, motion, and possible action to approve or not to approve the proposed operational budget for 2007-2008.

9. Discussion, motion, and possible action to approve or not to approve the annual contract with CareerTech.

10. Discussion, motion, and possible action to approve or not to approve any fund raising request that may have been received.

11. Discussion, motion, and possible action to approve or not to approve the Procurement Plan for Child Nutrition for the 2007-2008 school year.

12. Discussion, motion, and possible action to approve or not to approve the purchase of a new vehicle.

13. Discussion, motion, and possible action to approve or not to approve the following items as surplus. (Textbooks, Science Equipment)

14. New business - Items that could not have been foreseen or known about at the time agenda was posted which need action.

15. Vote to adjourn

Lion Harry Freiouf was present a 25 year member pin Tuesday evening during Medford Lions club meeting. The pin was presented by District Governor Don Donahoo, Enid

Lion Deana Kilian was also presented a special gift during Tuesday evening Lions Meeting. She received a beautiful flower bouquet from her family, Tuesday was Deana’s birthday. Husband Steve was a guest during the evening because of his wife’s birthday. HAPPY BIRTHDAY DEANA!

District Governor Don Donahoo, was a guest during the Medford Lions Club meeting Tuesday evening to present three pins to Lion members.

Pictured,

Medford Lions Club president Angela Wilson was presented an Oklahoma Lions Club member pin by District Governor, Don Donahoo. The pin was presented to Lion Angela to take with her as she is being deployed to serve in Iraqi. President Lion Wilson was also presented a District Governor’s pin Tuesday evening.

Not pictured is Lion Duaine Schoneweis, Medford Lions Club secretary, who was presented a District Governor pin by Governor Donahoo.

Lion Don Melka, long time Medford Lion was also a special guest during the Tuesday evening meeting. Don and his wife Marilyn moved to Enid recently. Don has joined the North Enid Lions Club.

A practical session for "Mass Casualty Motor Vehicle Crash Training,” for the new first responders’ class that has been training in Medford over the last month, was held at the Medford airport last week. The class instructor is Matt Miller.

Departments involved in the mock accident were Medford EMS and Medford Fire Department, including members from the Pond Creek Fire and EMS Department, Nash Fire Department, Hawley Fire Department, and Miller EMS. Other contributors were John Adams, The City of Medford, David Rogers and OG&E.

The individuals involved were: John Benningfield, Matt Miller, Daniel Hesson, Dan Wilson, Dennis Brittain, Judy McCormick, Oma Lea Rogers, Jim Shepherd, Kim Rogers, David Williams, Randy Cowgar, Angela Scott, Alan Juhl, Dennis Sullivan, Tom Woodson, Sara Halcomb, Mike Glenn, and Punky Halcomb, Jennifer Misak and Haley Cline.

The Medford Chamber of Commerce will be feeding the people on

the cattle drive at Alma's on Wednesday, October 3rd.

Although the meal is just for the riders, anyone can

come to Alma's to visit them. They will be having

ribs, salads, and cobblers. The time has not been

scheduled yet, it will depend on the progress they

make that day, but most likely it will be around 6:30

Anyone wishing to see the Centennial Cattle Drive up close as it passes through Grant County can do so Tuesday Oct. 2. The drive is scheduled to be in Pond Creek.

An approximate, and keep in mind this is an estimate time will be 2 p.m. Bleachers is being provided at the airport. Grant County schools have been invited. Several businesses will be severing lunch.

The drive will be moving onto US 81 west of the airport moving down US 81 until it crosses the bridge north of Pond Creek. News and radio stations will be broadcasting from Pond Creek that day.

Again, 2 p.m. is only an estimated time of arrival.

Evans and Associates from Ponca City will be doing several street projects in Medford over the next few weeks.

“We are going to overlay most of Ash Street, the alley south of Bank 7, Guthrie Street north of Bank 7, portions of South 7th and North 5th. Said Dea Kretchmar, Medford city manager. “Also scheduled for the project is South Main Street from Pawnee to Highway 81, south 2nd street, and a portion of Kiowa, Kretchmar stated.

The streets will be pulverized and stabilized before the overlay is put down.

This project was made possible by the one cent dedicated sales tax.

The total project should cost around $230,000.00

Pictured is south 2nd street

Mon.. Sept 24 Pancakes

Lunch: Nachos

Tues . Sept 25 Breakfast: breakfast pizza

Lunch: fish

Wed.. Sept.26 Breakfast: Long Johns

Lunch: Chicken Fried Steak

Thus. Sept. 27 Breakfast: Biscuits and gravy

Lunch: Spaghetti

Fri. Sept. 28 Breakfast: Cereal

Lunch: Taco Burgers

The Grant County Farm Bureau women’s committee sponsored a Citizenship Seminar Day at the Grant County courthouse Wednesday for all Grant County 8th graders.

The large group of students met on the second floor of the courthouse where

Grant County elected officials first gave a brief description of what their office responsibly in county government is.

The students then played out a mock trial. The Civil Judgment trial was a fun portrayal of “Gold E. Locks and The Three Bears.

In opening statements, the Bears attorney stated that they would show that one crisp fall Morning Mom A. Bear got up early and made a steaming bowl of porridge. She intended to serve the bowl of porridge to Pop A. Bear and Babe E. Bear for breakfast. We will further show that because the porridge was too hot, the Bears decided to take a walk in the forest. While walking in the forest, Gold E. Locks entered the home of the three Bears and ate some porridge out of the bowls of Mom A. Bear and Pop A. Bear. She ate all the porridge from the bowl of Babe E. Bear. After eating Babe E. Bear's porridge, Gold E. Locks sat down in Babe E. Bear's chair and broke it. After breaking the Babe E. Bear's chair, Gold E. Locks went upstairs and fell asleep in Babe E. Bear's bed. Through our evidence we will show that Gold E. Locks did not use good manners in her actions.

The panel of 8th grade jury members found in favor of the plaintiffs and awarded the Bear family $20.00 in damages.

Oklahoman does well

Last January the New Orleans Times Picayune reported that a Cajun amateur

archaeologist having dug to a depth of 10-meters just outside of New

Orleans found traces of copper wire dating back 100 years.... and came to the

conclusion that their ancestors already had a telephone network more than

100 years ago.

Not to be outdone by the Cajuns, in the weeks that followed, Texan

scientists dug to a depth of 20-meters on the outskirts of Dallas. Shortly

after, headlines in the Dallas Morning News read:

"Texas archaeologists have found traces of 200-year old copper wire, and

have concluded that their ancestors already had an advanced high-tech

communications network one hundred years earlier than the Cajuns."

One week later, The Daily Oklahoman reported the following:

"After digging as deep as 30-meters in wheat fields near Medford, Bubba

Williams, a self-taught archaeologist, reported that he found absolutely

nothing. Bubba has therefore concluded that 300-years ago Okies were

already using wireless."

Lloyd Schmitz and Vi Friesen, Medford, pictured waiting for the return visit Tuesday morning September 18 of, Union Pacific’s number 844, a 1944 steam powered locomotive. The train is traveling through the state in celebration of Oklahoma’s 100th Birthday Day, as a gift of the Union Pacific Railroad.

This was a once in a lifetime experience for Grant County residences, to take a ride on this steam powered train and Medford was extremely excited to be chosen to be a scheduled stop for this historical event.

Breakfast and Lunch Menu

Mon.. Sept 17 Breakfast: Waffles, Peanut Butter Cup, Fruit or Juice, Milk

Lunch: Hot ham and cheese on bun, baked beans, pickle spear, fruit, milk

Tues . Sept 18 Breakfast: Scrambled eggs, biscuit fruit or juice, milk

Lunch: pork roast, dressing, mashed potatoes/gravy, green beans, fruit, milk

Wed.. Sept.19 Breakfast: Fruit pie, juice, milk

Lunch: Taco salad, corn, cinnamon roll, fruit, milk

Thus. Sept. 20 Breakfast: Biscuits and gravy, fruit or juice, milk

Lunch: Li’l Smokies, mac and cheese, peas, hot roll, fruit, milk

Fri. Sept. 21 Breakfast: Cereal, toast, Fruit or juice, milk

Lunch: Chili Dog, Sauerkraut, French fries, fruit, milk

There will be a Hunter Education Course at Medford Civic Center October 6th, 2007 from 9:00 a.m. to 6 p.m. No Pre-Registration required. Call Reigh or Woodard.
MHS Homecoming is Sept28th and 29th. Hope you will attend the festivites on Friday night with the buffet in the school cafeteria starting at 5 p.m. and the football game at 7:30 Medford Vs Coyle. The parade will start at 11:00 with the Busy Moms BBQ dinner following the Parade in the Medford Civic Center. The Alumni Banquet will be held at 5 p.m. in the School Cafeteria.

Medford Alumni Association officers for 2007 are; Donna Frazier, President--Class of 1982; Sheryl Hern Schmitz,Vice President, Class of 1965; Evelyn Osburn Keith, Secreatry, Class of 1955; Darla Wevster Subera, Treasurer, Class of 1961.

Sautrday following the Parade. The Busy Moms will once again be serving their most famous BBQ lunch in the Medford Civic Center. The cost of the meal will be $7.00 per person and you pay at the door. The Busy Moms use all proceeds on projects that benefit Medford. A lot of the proceeds go toward the senors citizens Christmas Dinner.
In Loving Memory of Dorothy Simons

A new bench is now displayed in front of Medford’s public Library.

The Oklahoma Centennial bench was a donation by the Simons family in loving memory of Dorothy Simons, a long time Grant County Educator. A dedication is being planned,at a later date

The Medford FFA consignment sale was held Saturday Sept. 15th and was a huge success. It's so wonderful to see the community support our school in this way.

PIctured in foreground is Ryan Ellis FFA/Ag teacher. Background is Steve Stinson auctioneer

Flackman Stump removal is pictured removing the dead tree on the east side of the school, near the cafeteria Saturday morning The tree provided a shady parking place for several past cooks over the years. The large rocks that surrounded the tree was also removed.

One of Grant County’s historical homes destroyed by fire Sunday afternoon.

The home not occupied since March of 1987 after the death of Cecyle Turner, mother of Luella Lipsett.

The fire was reported at approximately 1:30. Pond Creek fire department was call to help to control the fire responding as a mutual aid for the Medford fire department.

Strong prevailing winds caused the fire to spread across the road into a gassy field, although no further damage reported.

The home has been reportedly vandalized several times over the past years and is located just out side Medford’s city limits. The fire is under investigation.

Picture Number one

Medford firefighters take a break after battling an afternoon house fire.

Picture Number 2

Heavy smoke fills the area as a vacant house once belonging to long time Grant County resident Cecyle Turner, burned to the ground Sunday afternoon.

The home was located on the southwest outer limits of Medford.

Nothing was left but the foundation line and chimney of the house located just outside the Medford City linits, showned in the picture heavy smoke filled the air.

Charges filed and an arrest warrant issued on a Medford man after a Medford police officer saw an ATV being rode on city streets.

Kevin Leon Richardson, 32 charged in Grant County district court on one misdemeanor count of threaten to perform an act of violence. This crime is punishable by imprisonment up to 6 months.

According to the affidavit, On Thursday night around 11:12 p.m. officer Biggs was parked in the Jiffy Trip parking lot and could hear some type of motorized vehicle running around the east side of town. When Biggs drove to Front St. and Chicago, he noticed a four wheeler driving down Front St. and turned east on Comanche, the ATV then went approximately ½ block and turned south in an alleyway, and pull into Kevin Richardson’s backyard.

According to court records, when Biggs exited his police car to advise the driver of the ATV not to be riding on city streets. Richardson allegedly stood up and told Biggs that he needed to get off his property or he was going to fight the officer. Officer Biggs then told Richardson whoever was riding the ATV needed to stop and at that time Richardson then allegedly told Biggs he was going to get a gun and shoot him. Richardson then ran for the house allegedly saying he was going after a gun. When other officers arrived on the scene, Richardson could not be located.

Ponca City Centennial Parade Grand Marshal Is Linda Brown

The grand marshal for the upcoming Ponca City Centennial parade and celebration will be Linda Brown, 2007 Ponca Citian of the Year.

"A Rich Heritage, A Promising Future," is a fitting theme for the farm girl from Medford who wandered into Evans and Associates in 1975 going from a receptionist to chairman of the Board and CEO in 2002.

"Linda epitomizes the Pioneer spirit of Oklahoma and is a role model for young women in our community," says Helene Schwartz, United Way director and chair of the Centennial Parade. "The Citizen of the Year always leads the United Way parade and we are proud to have her as the grand marshal for the Ponca City Centennial Parade," continues Schwartz.

Brown spent five years on the Ponca City Planning Commission, chaired the Mayor's Blue Ribbon Committee, Economic Development Advisory Board, Ponca City Housing Committee, the Ponca City Area Chamber of Commerce and the Ponca City Tourism Board.

She was named the 2003 Soroptimist Woman of Distinction, serves on the University Center board and the Board of Regents of Northern Oklahoma College. This list is but a sample of three pages of service to the community and many other awards and honors. Brown and her husband John have four children and three grandchildren.

Brown will lead the parade up Grand Avenue on Oct. 6, at 9:30 a.m. Other dignitaries in the parade include 40 descendants of B.S. Barnes who are traveling from around the country as well as Germany to be part of the parade. They will be riding in horse drawn wagons and walking along the parade route. The Ponca City Centennial float will be honored to have seven former Ponca City mayors on board.

No one needed to ask “where’s the Beef" Tuesday night during Medford Lion’s Club annual Hamburger Fry. Jerry and the gang at Karl’s Apple Market did a superb job of cooking the burgers, and Nancy Wilson’s Baked Beans just seem to get better tasting each year. Words simply can not describe the Cinnamon Rolls made by the cooks in the school's kitchen. Did you see how large some were, Wow! Everyone thought Grant County sheriff Roland Hula did a fantasic job serving them also. Only one women said no thank you to the Cinnamon Rolls but her husband quickly spoke up and said "Just put IT on my plate"!

The hamburger fry was held in the cafeteria just before Medford school’s open house.

Money raised through donations for the meal, will be used by the Lion’s Club for community projects during the coming year.

Five of Medford Lion’s Club members pictured; from right to left are Deana Kilian, Debbie Kretchmar, Roland Hula, and Steve Wilson. Standing in front of the serving area is Tony Boeckman

Posted this 7th day of September, 2007, at 3:30 p.m. at the main office entrance, cafeteria doors and workroom to the Medford School Building and the school website.

Posted by Gloria Gonzales. Deputy Clerk

(NOTE: The Medford Board of Education may discus, vote to approve, vote to disapprove, vote to table or decide not to vote on any item on this agenda)

Call to order and recording of members present and absent to establish a quorum.

Consent Agenda:

All of the following items, which concern reports and items of a routine nature normally approved at a board meeting, will be approved by one board vote, unless any board member desires to have a separate vote on any or all of these items. The consent agenda consists of the discussion, consideration, and approval of the following items:

The corrections of minutes from the August 6, 2007 regular meeting.

Transfer of funds within the activity fund account:

i. $58.00 from the all sports club to the athletic account.

ii. $150.00 from concessions to FCA.

Approval of monthly financial reports ending September 7, 2007.

1. Treasurer’s report and investment report.

2. Encumbrance Registers and change orders in the General and Building Funds.

3. Warrant Registers and change orders in the General and Building Funds.

4. School Activity Fund Monthly summary

Naming Julie Angle the K-12 Gifted/Talented sponsor.

Teacher Report

Principals Report

Superintendents Report

A. Enrollment – 243 students

B. Accreditation – No deficiencies.

C. CRT and EOI test results.

Discussion, motion and possible board action regarding any emergency transfers for 2007-2008.

Discussion, motion and possible board action to accept or reject the donation of $500.00 from Randy and Joan Kretchmar to the school district.

Discussion, motion and possible board action to accept or reject the contract with da Vinci Network Services

Discussion, motion and possible board action to accept or reject the donation of 818.67 from the golf boosters to the school district.

Discussion, motion and possible board action regarding items listed as surplus.

(Textbooks, Art Supplies)

Discussion, motion and possible board action regarding fund raising request and expenses for the 2007-2008 school year.

Discussion, motion and possible board action to approve the terms of negotiations with MCTA.

Vote to approve any resignations that have been received.

Discussion, motion, and possible action regarding the purchase of a new vehicle.

New business - Items that could not have been foreseen or known about at the time agenda was posted which need action.

Vote to adjourn

Union Pacific Railroad will celebrate Oklahoma’s Centennial with a visit by a historic steam locomotive.

UP’s locomotive No. 844 was the last steam locomotive delivered to the railroad in 1944 and is unique because it is the only steam locomotive never officially retired by a major North American railroad.

The train will come from Wichita, Kan., to Enid Saturday. It will be on display 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday Sept. 10 at the old depot south of Garriott between Grand and second.

A high-speed passenger engine, it once pulled such famous trains as the Overland Limited, Los Angeles Limited, Portland Rose and Challenger.

No. 844 will pull the Sooner Rocket consisting of 11 cars through Sept. 24 through communities mostly in west central Oklahoma.

The cars are the “Art Lockman” tool car, the “Howard Fogg” boiler-dorm car, the “Golden State Limited” and “Council Bluffs” baggage cars, the “Sherman Hill” souvenir car, the “Sunshine Special” coach car, the “Columbine” dome coach, the “Portland Rose” coach car, the “City of Portland” and “Missouri River Eagle” dome diner cars, and the “Idaho” inspection car.

“Union Pacific is honored to be a part of the Oklahoma Centennial celebration, and we’re pleased to provide everyday heroes of our communities a fun ride on our historic steam train,” said UP Representative Joe Adams.

The UP is recognizing the historical significance of the state by visiting as many communities as possible along the railroad’s west central Oklahoma route and other communities in the Midwest, making whistle stops to display the train for the public.

A Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) transmitter was installed on one of the rail cars that will travel with No. 844. The GPS system has been integrated with a map on UP’s Web site, www.up.com. Enter the word “steam” in the search box on the homepage for a shortcut to the map.

Web site visitors will be able to access route maps with varying amounts of detail. The GPS system will update the map every five minutes showing No. 844’s location.

According to the railroad’s schedule, the train will be in Medford 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Saturday arrive in Enid about 1:30 p.m. today and will be on display Monday. It will leave Enid at 9 a.m. Tuesday and will arrive in Hennessey at 9:45 a.m. It will be in Hennessey until 10:15 a.m., and then will arrive in Kingfisher at 11:30 a.m. It will leave at noon for El Reno.

It eventually will end up in Lone Star, Texas, and Friday before heading back up the line.

It will be back in Kingfisher 10:45 to 11:15 a.m. Sept. 17; in Hennessey noon to 12:30 p.m. Sept. 17; and will arrive in Enid at 1:15 p.m. Sept. 17. It will leave Enid at 8 a.m. Sept. 18 and be in Medford 9:15 to 9:45 a.m. before heading back into Kansas.

UP’s steam locomotive Number 844 is pictured Saturday arriving in Medford from Caldwell to pickup passengers for a train ride to Enid. The train travels at an estimated speed of 25 mph

February 1954

Miss Margaret Anne Hula, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Hula of Medford was the winner of the current photograph of the month award for the American Girl magazine. The prize winning picture which earned a cash award for Miss Hula appears in the March issue of the magazine.

The Washington Tea, given by the Daughters of Plymouth at the Congregational Church was well attended Monday afternoon. A miscellaneous program was presented by the following preceding the tea; Mary Defrees, Nedra Nichols, Ruth Reed, Carolyn Ciskowskis, Darla Dahlem, Charlotte Fore, Barbara Peitz, Janelle Webster and the high school boys quartet composed of Billy Joe Phillips, J. W. Gibson, Danny Kennedy and Gary Beatie.

Contractor, Terry Ryan has been hire by the city of Medford to replace 500' feet of an old 8" waterline.

“500 feet of this particular section of line has been plagued with leaks for over 20 years and it is a great relief to the mataintance staff to finally have it replaced,” said Dennis Brittain, supervisor. .

Work began Monday the 27 and is expected to take about two weeks.

Water was off to some residents in the area of the repair for a short time Monday. While valves were installed to isolate the line to be repaired, however no further outages are expected associated with this project, said city officials.

“The installing of the line is from the entrance ODOT state yard east to south Third Street and then south. We are also putting in new shut off valves which will make it easier to isolate certain sections of town when we are doing water line repairs and maintenance.’ said Dea Kretchmar Medford city manager. “The valves will allow us to shut down sections of town rather than the entire city.” Kretchmar stated.

The cost of the project is around $10,000 for labor and materials. The project is expected to take about two weeks to finish, weather permitting.

Looking Back Through The Years

February 24, 1944

George Schultz, Medford, and Mary Thompson, Pond Creek, represented Grant County at the state Democratic meeting in Oklahoma City held Monday.

Andrew J. Swanson, Medford farmer was presented with a plaque Tuesday night at the Countywide meeting of the sheep producers for his many activities in various types of cooperative endeavor.

Mrs. P.B. Kennedy, Mrs. Chester Long, Mrs. Bernard Blubaugh, Mrs. Norlia Aven and Miss Joan Reed spent Saturday in Wichita on Business

Mrs. Joe Fisher was honored on her birthday Monday evening with a party at her home. Enjoying visiting, playing cards. ice cream and cake.

Guest was Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Kretchmar, Mr. and Mrs. T .M. Lora, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Huffman, and The Fisher’s children.

Sunday dinner guest of Mr. and Mrs. Gerald McKeeman of near Renfrew were Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Frieouf and Judy Jo, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. McKeeman and M. E. Mckeeman.

Mrs. Carrie Reser entertained Sunday in honor of the birthday of Lenita Goodrick.

The football championship playoff plan was adopted Thursday at the annual Oklahoma High school Athletic Assn.

Playing at Medford’s Alvo Theater was “Action in the North Atlantic.”

Starring Humphrey Bogart and Alan Hale.

Completion of the 26-inch pipeline connecting the Hugoton natural gas field of western Kansas with eastern points is expected by April 1, 1944. The pipeline was laid through Grant County.

Completion for the new playground structure at the Koch Ballpark was finished this month by the addition of the shelter and benches.

The structure was funded jointly between the City of Medford and the Oklahoma Department of Recreation. A grant application was completed in January of this year with the award announcement being made in October. With remaining funds a shelter was provided for added enjoyment to the play area.

“The playground structure will provide entertainment and exercise to children attending softball and baseball games. Parents will now have a place where their children can play at the field and stay entertained. Sometimes during tournaments, families are at the field for several hours and the siblings of the players had nothing to do or play. The Medford City Council is always striving to do community development projects.” said Dea Kretchmar, Medford city manager.

Robert ( Bob) Drennan, (left) Pond Creek business man, was sworn into office by Mayor Larry Berg (right) as council member of ward 4, during Pond Creek’s regular August council meeting August 30th.

Drennan will finish the term of office replacing Mike Shaffer who resigned because of moving from ward number 4.

Bars Can't Stop Me

Additional charges were filed Friday in Grant County district court on Brad W. Honeycutt an inmate in the Grant County Jail.

Honeycutt was charged with one felony count of injuring a public building.

According to court records, on August 16, the Grant County sheriff’s office received a call from a passing motorist that a container was allegedly being lowered out of the south upstairs jail window next to the south door. When Grant county deputy Scott Sterling went to investigate, he allegedly found a cell phone and cigarettes in the front of the building on the east side, but nothing on the south side.

On August 21 a cage with expanded metal covering was bolted over the outside of the only window in cell number 4, which is the cell that Brad Honeycutt is being housed, on numerous other felony charges, including breaking into a garage in Lamont.

On Tuesday August 28, it was noticed that the new window covering had a softball-sized hole in it.

When a shake down was done on cell number 4, Sterling allegedly found strips of a bed sheet tied together, with a butter dish attached so to be lower out of the window capable of retrieve contraband into the facility, stating the affidavit.

Sterling allegedly asked Honeycutt why he tore up the new window covering. Honeycutt’s answer was he did not know why. Sterling then asked Honeycutt what tool he used to cut the expanded metal with and Honeycutt allegedly told Sterling a plastic ink pen, which according to the affidavit, would have been impossible. The affidavit stated there is a pair of pliers in the cell used to change channels on the television. That is believed, as stated in the affidavit, to be the tool used to break the metal open.

Court records state that the cost of the window is approximately 100.00; the cost to replace the bed sheet is stated at 7.00.

Needed Gas Money, Leads to Theif

A Medford resident, Frankie Roberts, 21, 424 N. 6th Street, has been charged in Grant county district court on two felony counts, false declaration of ownership in pawn and burglary in the second degree.

According to court information, on August 29 Medford assistant police chief Alan Juhl was summoned to the Servant Living Center nursing home to take a report from an employee, Robin Wilson, of a missing DVD player and several CD’s from her home Wilson also told Juhl a 100 dollars in cash had been missing recently as well, from her residents on south 4th street.

During the investigation, Juhl went to Pioneer Pawn Trading Co. in Medford to check if any one had pawned a DVD that day. Pawnshop owner Joe Fuello told Juhl that Frankie Roberts of Medford pawned an Emerson player along with 79 CD’s, in a nylon case on August 29. Wilson identified the DVD player and CD’s as being hers.

Wilson told Juhl that Roberts had been round her house a lot lately hanging out with her older son.

During an interview, Roberts allegedly confessed to entering Wilson’s home and taking her DVD player and CD’s saying he needed “gas money” but had planned to allegedly take the property out of pawn later and returning it to Wilson. Roberts denied any knowledge of the missing cash, according to the affidavit.

These values represent statistics for the day in progress.

They do NOT represent final daily values.

Statistical data for Medford: August 30, 2007 ( since 1:00 am CDT)

Class Parameter Value Time (CDT)

Air Temperature Maximum Temperature 82 F 12:35 pm

Minimum Temperature 69 F 7:00 am

Average Temperature 74 F

Dewpoint Temperature Maximum Dewpoint Temperature 69 F 11:45 am

Minimum Dewpoint Temperature 66 F 6:20 am

Average Dewpoint Temperature 67 F

Relative Humidity Maximum Relative Humidity 90 % 7:10 am

Minimum Relative Humidity 63 % 12:40 pm

Average Relative Humidity 80 %

10 cm Soil Temperature (sod) Maximum TS10 Soil Temperature 82 F 1:15 pm

Minimum TS10 Soil Temperature 78 F 9:15 am

Average TS10 Soil Temperature 79 F

10 cm Soil Temperature (bare) Maximum TB10 Soil Temperature 85 F 1:15 pm

Minimum TB10 Soil Temperature 80 F 9:15 am

Average TB10 Soil Temperature 82 F

Barometric Pressure Maximum Barometric Pressure 29.07 in 10:50 am

Minimum Barometric Pressure 29.01 in 3:20 am

Average Barometric Pressure 29.04 in

Wind Speed Maximum Wind Speed 16 mph 11:15 am

Average Wind Speed 6 mph

Wind Direction Prevailing Wind Direction NNE (41%)

Secondary Wind Direction NE (32%)

Rainfall Rainfall 0.00 in

Solar Radiation Maximum Solar Radiation 1063 W/m2 12:35 pm

Total Solar Radiation 8.7 MJ/m2

Kathy Miller once again is displaying her artistry in downtown Medford Friday afternoon when she so graciously agreed to pose for a picture while painting Sunflowers and a sign on the window of Two Sister’. A gift and Scrapbooking store.

Harley’s Feed and Grain Store an Icon for the city of Pond Creek for years came tumbling down on it own Friday, after years of service to Grant County.

Age and stress on the building finally played its toll on one of Pond Creek’s oldest downtown structures. The structure had been vacant for several years.

Feed Sack Fashions to Cinderella Dreams

Seeing where the building that once housed Harley' Feed Store in Pond Creek clasped this week brought back memories of my mother telling stories about trips to the feed store, during the Great Depression in the 1930's. My mom is deceased and I value the stories I remember her telling.

The feed stores back then sold their feed in 100 lb. sacks. The feed usually came in burlap sacks or printed cotton muslin sacks. The printed cotton muslin sacks usually came in floral prints with four or five different print patterns.

My parents like most families during this time did not waste anything. They were very creative in finding a 'use' for most items. Many women during this time would use the cotton muslin sacks to make clothes. The "Sack Dress" as it was called was the most popular garment to make. The woman of the house would usually go with her husband to the feed store when it was time to buy feed for the animals. This would give her a chance to see the printed cotton sacks and pick which print pattern she would want on that particular trip to the feed store.

Dress patterns would usually sell from fifteen to twenty-five cents, mom would say. Many women